Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 60, more Pathos and Tension, Developing Characters Rising Action

2 September 2014, Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 60, more Pathos and Tension, Developing Characters Rising Action

Announcement: My new novels are supposed to be released 1 September, so we are heading toward home plate.  The title of the series is Ancient Light and is based on my novel Aegypt.  The next two novels will be Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  They will be published individually and as a 3 in 1 book.  The initial cover is already developed, and you can see it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my new novel, Valeska, is: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

I’m writing about Aristotle’s pathos and tension in character development.  Pathos in literature is the quality of creating emotion in your readers.  A pathetic character is one who evokes emotion.  I generally try to develop a protagonist and/or a protagonist’s helper character who strongly evokes an emotional response in my readers.  I would like to present and evolve every scene such that the scene and the interaction of the characters creates strong emotion.  The point of this kind of writing is to get your readers to be enveloped by the writing.

To achieve this, the first step is to build a pathetic character.  If you start with a character people want to love and feel sorry for, you will have a much easier job putting your character in scenes that evoke emotion in your readers.  If I start a scene with a bedraggled, hungry, dirty, girl vampire and I tell you her hunt was just ruined, you can’t help feeling for her.  In spite of the potential horror you might feel about a vampire or anything else undead, if I can make you see such a person in your mind’s eye through my writing, I have won half the battle in sucking you into the writing and holding you there.

If I take an agent who is suddenly wounded and dying, a person who appeals to you–if I can make you see such a person and understand their regret and suffering, I can hold you in the world of the writing.  This is the power of pathos.  Imagine a hunting girl vampire and a wounded agent who accidentally ruined her hunt–we begin to move from pathos to wonder and mystery… and tension.

More tomorrow.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 59, Pathos and Tension, Developing Characters Rising Action

1 September 2014, Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 59, Pathos and Tension, Developing Characters Rising Action

Announcement: My new novels are supposed to be released 1 September, so we are heading toward home plate.  The title of the series is Ancient Light and is based on my novel Aegypt.  The next two novels will be Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  They will be published individually and as a 3 in 1 book.  The initial cover is already developed, and you can see it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my new novel, Valeska, is: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

What are Aristotle’s pathos and tension in character development?  I’ve written about both concepts before.  In my novel writing, I work to develop primary characters (protagonists and protagonist’s helpers) who are certain to cause a very high level of pathos.  Pathos is the characteristic of producing emotion in your readers.  This is what Aristotle meant by a pathetic character.  In general English, pathetic means something a little different than this very defined meaning.  Classically, a pathetic character is one who evokes emotion.  For example, in my “vampire” novel, the idea of a vampire who is a girl immediately evokes some degree of emotion from a reader.  All readers grab onto the idea of youth and youthful characters.  This is why there are very few protagonists who are very old.  Still a vampire who is a young girl automatically gets a degree of emotional attention.

Such a character can be easily enhanced in the sphere of emotion.  If the girl vampire is abandoned, abused, dirty, hungry, whose clothing is fine but ruined.  If she is alone and lives in a grave.  Such a character, if properly handled, can build pathos.  Such a character just by existing in the writing develops pathos.  Only the psychopathic could not see emotion is this type of character.  That is unless the author intentionally turns this kind of character into a monster.  For example, a vampire girl who is hungry, abandoned, abused, dirty, whose clothing is ruined, and who lives in a grave and whose own actions and behavior is wholly responsible as the cause, will not generate the degree of pathos of one whose actions and behavior didn’t cause the negatives.  In other words, a character who cannot completely help themselves but is trying returns a much higher degree of pathos than one who caused their own misfortune.

More tomorrow.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 58, Pity and Fear, Developing Characters Rising Action

31 August 2014, Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 58, Pity and Fear, Developing Characters Rising Action

Announcement: My new novels are supposed to be released 1 September, so we are heading toward home plate.  The title of the series is Ancient Light and is based on my novel Aegypt.  The next two novels will be Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  They will be published individually and as a 3 in 1 book.  The initial cover is already developed, and you can see it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my new novel, Valeska, is: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

Yesterday, I kind of glanced into the climax without planning to.  I mentioned, yesterday, about overcoming a telic flaw.  This is the crux of both classic comedy and tragedy (according to Aristotle).  If you trust Aristotle (I do).  Look–very few things I write about are absolutely cut and dried–most are based in ideas and opinion.  They are usually tested ideas either by time or experience, but they are ideas.  Heck, if you don’t like Aristotle’s ideas, you don’t have to use them, but you need to know them and consider them.  In my day job, knowing the rules and the limits is critical to life and death.  If you know the rules and limits, you know when you are intentionally exceeding them.  If you know you are intentionally breaking the rules or exceeding the limits, you could be a wise and successful (in my business a live) person.  If you don’t…well, fools tend to pay for their foolishness one way or the other.  It pays, in writing, to understand Aristotle and classic literary forms.

Aristotle is well known for his treatise on tragedy.  We also surmise he wrote a treatise on comedy.  The one on tragedy is still extant, the one on comedy has been lost in time.  You should read Aristotle’s treatise on tragedy, but let me give you the ten cent outline.  According to Aristotle, good tragedy comes out of strong tragic characters–such characters must be able to generate pity and fear in the viewer (he was writing about plays–so insert reader).  What Aristotle meant by pity and fear is what we call in English: pathos and tension.

More tomorrow.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 57, yet more Redemptive Theme, Developing Characters Rising Action

30 August 2014, Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 57, yet more Redemptive Theme, Developing Characters Rising Action

Announcement: My new novels are supposed to be released 1 September, so we are heading toward home plate.  The title of the series is Ancient Light and is based on my novel Aegypt.  The next two novels will be Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  They will be published individually and as a 3 in 1 book.  The initial cover is already developed, and you can see it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my new novel, Valeska, is: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

There is a third type of classical redemptive theme.  This is when a person or a being is redeemed in a religious or Christian sense.  The reason this is a classical theme is that in all Western literature, even if the theme is from evil to good, there is an assumption of Christian redemption.  I point this out for historical accuracy and to make a very important point.  In any classical redemptive theme, there must be some spiritual element.  The spiritual element from the classics is one of Christian redemption, and there is no reason why this theme should be simply relegated to inspirational or Christian literature today.  The big point is, as anyone should note (C.S. Lewis’ argument), the incorporation of a spiritual creature (like a vampire, zombie, or any other undead) presumes God.  You can’t enter the spiritual regime without addressing God in some way.  The expression doesn’t need to be a stereotypical conversion or a presumptive theological construct, but without God, there is no spiritual.

Therefore, by bringing a vampire into a novel, the author is making a presumption of some type of Christian or at least a spiritual worldview.  It is possible to have other gods or other worldviews (Asian, Eastern, Western, African, etc.), but they must include some spiritual god element or they become quickly illogical.  If you are not convinced, read an unexpurgated (unabridged) copy of Dracula.  Bram Stoker was a strong Catholic and presented a powerful Christian and redemptive worldview in a novel that has been more and more secularized.  I prefer the original.  The message of Bram Stoker was one of hope and redemption.  The message of a secular Dracula is powerful, but not hopeful or pleasant in the least.  Although we have lost Aristotle’s treatise on comedy, we know the message of good comedy is that of a human overcoming a telic flaw.  In a classical redemptive theme, the telic flaw can only be overcome through spiritual means.

More tomorrow.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 56, more Redemptive Theme, Developing Characters Rising Action

29 August 2014, Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 56, more Redemptive Theme, Developing Characters Rising Action

Announcement: My new novels are supposed to be released 1 September, so we are heading toward home plate.  The title of the series is Ancient Light and is based on my novel Aegypt.  The next two novels will be Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  They will be published individually and as a 3 in 1 book.  The initial cover is already developed, and you can see it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my new novel, Valeska, is: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

A more unique type of redemptive theme is that a being who is generally thought to be evil could either be found to be good or could change from evil to good.  These are the types of unique themes I like to develop in my novels.  For example, the vampire novel I am writing has a theme of a redeemed vampire.  The obvious assumption is that the vampire becomes changed from a creature of evil to a creature of good.  A secondary assumption could be that the vampire changes from being a vampire back to a human.  I did not address this secondary assumption–there are reasons why this could be a good theme, but not necessarily in the universe of the novel I created.  I do like to look at “impossible” themes and have used them in the past.  That is, themes where some event is classically thought to be impossible.  For example, Aksinya.  I don’t believe any other author has written a novel where a person who calls a demon is redeemed both body and soul.  Such a redemption is generally considered “impossible.”  I would like to pursue the “impossible” theme of a vampire turned back into a human, but I think this would be extremely difficult because of what a vampire classically is.

A vampire is, by definition, a human that is dead and reanimated through some means.  The classical means is that the vampireness is conveyed by another vampire drinking the victim’s blood.  In my novel universe, the victim could only become a vampire if they were killed by the vampire and some essence of the vampire was then placed in the victim by the vampire.  This is logical and doesn’t reduce the strength of the idea of a “vampire.”  Since a vampire is already a dead human, unless you can propose the reanimation of a normal person, you can’t change a vampire.  This is one of the reasons a vampire is such a great pathetic character–they can’t change from being a vampire, but perhaps they can be redeemed in their soul.

More tomorrow.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 55, Redemptive Theme, Developing Characters Rising Action

28 August 2014, Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 55, Redemptive Theme, Developing Characters Rising Action

Announcement: My new novels are supposed to be released 1 September, so we are heading toward home plate.  The title of the series is Ancient Light and is based on my novel Aegypt.  The next two novels will be Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  They will be published individually and as a 3 in 1 book.  The initial cover is already developed, and you can see it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my new novel, Valeska, is: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

This is another reason I don’t like single word themes.  For example, if you say, your novel has a “love” theme, what exactly does that mean?  If you say it has a “true love” or “first love” theme, you are getting closer to some meaning–still obscure.  When I write that my novel has a redemptive theme, that can mean too many different things.

Classically, a redemptive theme means the protagonist is redeemed from some great evil in their life.  For example, the evil businessman who cheats his clients comes clean and repays what he stole, or the woman who prostitutes herself realizes her actions are wrong and becomes an upstanding member of society.

In my novel, Aksinya, the protagonist, Aksinya, called a demon from hell to help her save her family.  Her family was killed anyway.  Aksinya’s redemption is from the demon and her own demons.  These are classical redemptive themes.  Less classical, but just as important, in my mind, are redemptive themes where people are saved emotionally and mentally.  I have used these types of redemptive themes before–they can be much more powerful than a classic redemptive theme.  For example, the man who has turmoil over some terrible event in his life and overcomes the turmoil and the event, or the woman who is traumatized by abuse and overcomes that to help others.  I have used this as a theme in my novels as well.  Many times this is a good subtheme.  For example, in my novels Shadow of Light and Shadow of Darkness, the protagonist has to overcome (be redeemed) from her fear that her parents hate her and believe she is evil.  The novel is very complex in this regard, and the desire for people to make their parents happy is a very strong redemption theme.

You can see, a redemptive theme is a classic theme and one that has great potential to many audiences.

More tomorrow.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 54, more the Theme, Developing Characters Rising Action

27 August 2014, Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 54, more the Theme, Developing Characters Rising Action

Announcement: My new novels are supposed to be released 1 September, so we are heading toward home plate.  The title of the series is Ancient Light and is based on my novel Aegypt.  The next two novels will be Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  They will be published individually and as a 3 in 1 book.  The initial cover is already developed, and you can see it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my new novel, Valeska, is: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

I’ve mentioned this before–when you develop a theme for a novel, you should develop a unique theme.  Themes that are not very unique will not go anywhere with today’s readers or today’s publishers.  If your theme isn’t unique, you will not be able to compete in the novel marketplace.

I know already what you will say–you’ve been told that every theme has been used before and none are unique.  I used to believe this too–I think it is completely untrue.  Look at the theme statement above–that’s a pretty unique theme statement.  I’m not sure anyone has written a novel like that before.  I’m not sure anyone has written using the themes I did for many of my novels.  I will not go into the detail I did before about writing theme statements, but I will note for you that a single word theme such as redemption, has been used over and over again.  This is why I think single word themes are not very useful.  Although redemption is the theme of many of my novels, the single word “redemption” is not enough to describe their themes.

In trying to define redemption, I have written about gods and goddesses.  I’ve written about demi-gods and demi-goddesses.  I’ve written about dragons and a phoenix.  I’ve written about undead and demons. I’ve written about sorcery and magic.  In most classic themes about redemption, all the beings and ideas I listed would be on the evil and unredeemable list.  In my novels, I explore the possibility of the redemption of these creatures and of regular people as well.  Perhaps it would help to define a redemption theme.

More tomorrow.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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