Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 88, not showing Entertaining Characters, Developing Storyline Rising Action

30 September 2014, Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 88, not showing Entertaining Characters, Developing Storyline Rising Action

Announcement: I received the proofs a few days ago and completed my notes on them within the three day deadline.  The title of the series is Ancient Light and is based on my novel Aegypt.  The next two novels will be Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  They will be published individually and as a 3 in 1 book.  The initial cover is already developed, and you can see it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my new novel, Valeska, is: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

Here is my proposed cover for Valeska.  I decided on a white cover style.

You can see more at www.GoddessofDarkness.com.

The resolution in a novel is not about showing (or telling) everything.  In fact, a wise author will not show or tell everything about a character.  In many cases, the author might hint or provide some breadcrumbs, but too much information will only ruin a novel.  Let me go back to an example I like to use about this very subject.  This is from the initial scene of Children of Light and Darkness one of my Ancient Light Novels.

Kathrin McClellan tugged at her soggy blouse. She was already soaked, and the sun had barely crested the hills or the jungle treetops. The rain forest was heavy and green, bursting with vitality. Insects, birds, and larger animals already lifted up their repetitious calls with the rising sun. The aroma of the jungle was pervasive, and to Kathrin’s nose, everything, seemed thick and cloying. It was only made worse by the constant heat. Kathrin was not immune to the smells yet either—the fragrance and the heat. The air was so full of moisture each breath seemed like it tried to strangle her. She was reminded of the steam baths in Finland, but here, there was no opportunity to run out into the cold and dive into a freezing pool of water. There wasn’t any air conditioning here to escape for a little while from the oppressive grip of the heat, and the nighttime didn’t offer any relief either. At night, the place was dark and hot. Ugh, she hated it. It was so different from her native Scotland, and from her adopted land of England. Kathrin liked some of the food and the people. She liked to travel, and she enjoyed the experience, but she was just not used to the heat. James encouraged her and told her to keep at it. If they weren’t here on a job, she would have left a week ago. But it was a job. See the world, the recruiting posters said—well she had seen a lot of it, and this was about the only piece she didn’t like much at all.

James stepped out on the veranda, “Heat still bothering you, Kathrin?”

Kathrin didn’t say a word. She pursed her lips and clenched her jaw.

James turned around at the rail and leaned against it. He was tall and handsome, clean shaven. His hair was slightly tousled—always slightly tousled. It was brown and nondescript. His face, though handsome, was still nondescript. MI, Military Intelligence, liked their agents to look good, but not to draw too much attention. It was easier that way. James was strong and well trained. He always treated her like a lady, even when he didn’t have to and when she didn’t deserve it.

Kathrin knew she was pretty—perhaps bordering on beautiful. Her face was freckled and sported blazing green eyes. She had heart shaped lips in a heart shaped face. Her hair was red, and she was thin, perhaps too thin. She wasn’t very tall either. None of those characteristics ever seemed to affect her negatively. She spoke with a thick but improving Scottish brogue that made her a little difficult to understand at times. She knew she always showed a slightly harried look, and that was backed by an overly brisk personality. And true to the Gallic stereotype, she did possess a raging temper. It was a prideful secret that she kept it in check almost all of the time. When she let it out, it scared her. She didn’t let it out often, not at all since she had been working for the organization.

“The organization.” Now there was an enigma. It had been MI19, Military Intelligence section nineteen, during the big war, World War Two, but MI19 was officially defunct. It was just called “the organization” now. MI19 had originally been the language and interrogation services for British Military Intelligence. There was a big stink after the war about interrogation techniques, and to calm the public and foreign sensibilities, MI19 closed for a day and reopened the next as “the organization.” The focus of the organization today was language agents and operatives. It provided agents who could blend into the cultures and societies from which the British needed to gather information and intelligence. The organization now rarely conducted enemy agent interrogations—it did handle all defector and special intelligence interrogations. Sometimes it still accomplished enemy agent interrogations. All right, to be truthful, MI19 still did all the work it had during the big war, it just focused mainly on languages now—there weren’t that many enemies to interrogate. Kathrin ought to know, she was the head of the organization’s interrogation department. She was an operative and not an agent. She didn’t usually carry out field work, but her special skill and subtlety were supposed to be necessary here. During the big war, well before her time, her department included over half of the employees in the organization. She had just hired and trained a new interrogator so her department was now three strong. That’s the only reason they would think of sending her out to Burma on a mission with James Calloway.

James was an organizational share out to MI6. Military Intelligence section six was the British Secret Intelligence Service. James was a real agent. When he was a child, his family had lived in Burma as missionaries, and he had a fantastic ear for the language and the culture. Like so many of the agents who worked for the organization, he learned to speak his language in the streets as a child. He spoke the Burmese languages perfectly and knew almost every dialect in the nation. He also knew Mandarin Chinese, but he had not told Kathrin any of the other languages he spoke—she had no official “need to know,” and his language knowledge was somewhat classified.

Bruce Lyons was the director of the organization—Kathrin and James’ boss. For a long time, Mr. Lyons and the members of the organization thought he would be transferred and the organization subsumed under some other MI. Instead, as the British government scaled down their intelligence services, the organization had taken over many of the defunct MI groups. The organization supplied all the language trained agents to the rest of the MI system. That’s why James was a share.

For some reason, Bruce Lyons himself briefed them on their mission. The director usually didn’t do that, and the mission seemed simple. It had turned painful for more than one reason.

James checked his sidearm, “You still mad at me about last night?”

Kathrin’s eyes flashed at him. James tucked away his weapon and raised his hands.

All the fight drained out of her. She gazed out on the jungle, “It was my fault.”

“Then come on. It will only get hotter the longer we delay.”

Kathrin bared her teeth. She pulled her large hat around her ears and grimaced. She was slightly sunburned, and her ears and nose received the brunt—her ears, just where her hat rested on them. She followed James down the veranda and into the bursting sunlight. She sped up a little and caught up with him, “Where to today?”

“We tried the main sites all around the region.” He took a cautious glance around, “The reports and our leak said they were last seen in this general area. It mentioned a tomb and a temple—their usual modus operandi. We tried the obvious ones. I think we will get the lay of the land and seek locally for a while.”

“Then what?”

“I haven’t thought that far. We’re way off our original plans, and we still have time, orders, and funding.”

Kathrin folded her arms across her chest and paced at his side.

This isn’t the entire scene.  You can read the rest of this first chapter at my website.  In this scene, we know something happened last night between James and Kathrin.  Although the “what” is talked around by them later, I never tell you directly what happened.  You can guess, but it is better for the novel to leave the exact events unsaid.  I don’t even need to give the reader a flashback.  All I need to do is leave you a few breadcrumbs, and you make up a whole scenario in your own mind.  The “in your own mind” is precisely the point.  I’m going to tell you something your writing coaches, teacher, professors never told you.  This is it–don’t ever show or tell everything and don’t describe anything to perfection.  I’ll let you in on this secret tomorrow.

More tomorrow.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 87, and more showing Entertaining Characters, Developing Storyline Rising Action

29 September 2014, Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 87, and more showing Entertaining Characters, Developing Storyline Rising Action

Announcement: I received the proofs a few days ago and completed my notes on them within the three day deadline.  The title of the series is Ancient Light and is based on my novel Aegypt.  The next two novels will be Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  They will be published individually and as a 3 in 1 book.  The initial cover is already developed, and you can see it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my new novel, Valeska, is: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

Here is my proposed cover for Valeska.  I decided on a white cover style.

You can see more at www.GoddessofDarkness.com.

Where do these mysteries come from?  I’ve mentioned before that a novel is a revelation of the characters.  It is also a revelation of the plot and theme.  The author’s revelation of these are the mysteries that are revealed, but there is more.

In the real world, you never know everything about someone.  In the real world, nothing ever works out perfectly or cleanly.  In the real world, people don’t really win arguments.  One of the most salient features that makes a novel entertaining is the resolution of these things.  Not that you necessarily know everything about someone, but that you think you do.  Like I wrote recently about conversations in novels, the same applies for other resolutions and revelations.

There is a false (according to real life) quality to a conversation in any story or novel.  It is the perfection of the conversation–it looks like a conversation in real life, but it isn’t (it doesn’t include all the incomplete sentences, inarticulate sounds, incorrectly pronounced words, etc.).  Just as with conversation, novels represent a completion for a reader.  In real life no one (or very few) win arguments, but there is a large human desire to be correct and to know truth.  In a novel, a character can win an argument.  In a novel, the world can have a perfect revolution.  In a novel, an author can lead you to imagine you know everything about a character.  The perfection of resolution in a novel is like the last note in a symphony.  If the resolution is a perfect chord, the reader will imagine a completion.  Entertainment in novels is about completion.

More tomorrow.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 86, more showing Entertaining Characters, Developing Storyline Rising Action

28 September 2014, Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 86, more showing Entertaining Characters, Developing Storyline Rising Action

Announcement: I received the proofs a few days ago and completed my notes on them within the three day deadline.  The title of the series is Ancient Light and is based on my novel Aegypt.  The next two novels will be Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  They will be published individually and as a 3 in 1 book.  The initial cover is already developed, and you can see it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my new novel, Valeska, is: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

Here is my proposed cover for Valeska.  I decided on a white cover style.

You can see more at www.GoddessofDarkness.com.

The little mysteries in your novel and each scene are shown through conversation (and some description).  Don’t go overboard on the description and don’t use much (any) omniscient voice.  Let’s be straight on this subject.  If you are very cautious, there is nothing wrong with a little omniscient voice–just make certain it is a little and it is important and entertaining.  I won’t let you get away with anything that is not entertaining.  The purpose of any novel is entertainment–if you don’t have entertainment, you don’t have anything.

The little mysteries (or big mysteries) are the ideas that propel your novel.  Your novel may not have a discovery or a mystery theme, but the complete character revelation is certainly a mystery to be revealed and the overall plot is a mystery to be revealed.  If it isn’t you aren’t in the right profession.  If everything is obvious, then it isn’t worth writing about.  The overall solution to the “problem” in your novel is a mystery (or it should be).

Let’s take an accounting of the mysteries that you must reveal in your novel.  First, you reveal the characters (you developed them–in your novel, you reveal them).  Second, in every scene there should be something to reveal to the reader.  The action in the scene is a revelation (the plot revelation).  Third, the novel theme is a revelation, and fourth, the overall novel plot is a revelation.  The entire novel does not get revealed until the climax, the falling action, and the dénouement.  Every novel is a revelation of mystery, and this is the basis for its entertainment.

More tomorrow.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 85, showing Entertaining Characters, Developing Storyline Rising Action

27 September 2014, Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 85, showing Entertaining Characters, Developing Storyline Rising Action

Announcement: I received the proofs a few days ago and completed my notes on them within the three day deadline.  The title of the series is Ancient Light and is based on my novel Aegypt.  The next two novels will be Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  They will be published individually and as a 3 in 1 book.  The initial cover is already developed, and you can see it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my new novel, Valeska, is: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

Here is my proposed cover for Valeska.  I decided on a white cover style.

You can see more at www.GoddessofDarkness.com.

You can’t have any mystery if you “tell” the reader everything.  In fact, what mystery is there in telling at all?  If as part of your revelation of the character you developed, you just come out and tell us everything about that character, first it would take a book, and second, it will make a boring book.  This is one of the reasons I’m not very happy with using the first person in a novel.  You can’t keep anything a secret in the first person–and non-disclosure is the hallmark of any great writing.

Look, when a person is reading your novel, do you want them to be apoplectic and unexcited, or do you want them excited and desiring more and more.  Obviously, you want them to be reading with so much anticipation and interest that they rush through the book and start reading it again.  You can have this through the proper use of mystery and showing.  I am writing all at once here about my rules of writing.

When you develop your characters, develop interesting and entertaining characters.  When you develop your plot, develop a plot that is interesting and entertaining.  You can achieve this through mystery.  I don’t mean the genre “mystery,” although that genre can produce a great theme and plot.  I mean that throughout your novel, there are mysteries.  There are tantalizing tidbits of information and revelation that show the reader an amazing and entertaining world beneath the surface of the mundane.

More tomorrow.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 84, mysterious Entertaining Characters, Developing Storyline Rising Action

26 September 2014, Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 84, mysterious Entertaining Characters, Developing Storyline Rising Action

Announcement: I received the proofs a few days ago and completed my notes on them within the three day deadline.  The title of the series is Ancient Light and is based on my novel Aegypt.  The next two novels will be Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  They will be published individually and as a 3 in 1 book.  The initial cover is already developed, and you can see it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my new novel, Valeska, is: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

Here is my proposed cover for Valeska.  I decided on a white cover style.

You can see more at www.GoddessofDarkness.com.

Mysterious characters are entertaining.  In my yet unpublished novel, Dana-ana, the main character is the entire mystery in the novel.  This is a revelation (discovery) novel for the reader and for the protagonist (and the main characters).  I mentioned before, that all novels are revelation plots in that they “reveal” the main characters.  Novels like Dana-ana take this a step further and make the revelation a function of the entire theme and plot.  This is an important distinction and one that shows the difference between a theme and a plot.

Every plot “reveals” the characters the author developed–not every theme is a revelation (discovery) theme.  The theme of Dana-ana is to reveal who Dana-ana really is.  On the other hand, although Valeska (the vampire novel) has elements of mystery in it, the theme isn’t really about revelation of who the main characters are.  The revelation is an entertaining part of the plot, but not a focus of the theme.  As I mentioned before, who wouldn’t want to really interview a vampire?  In Valeska the reader gets to listen in on the conversation between a vampire and an agent of the organization.  You can see the mystery in both.

Of course, mystery should always be some part of the subthemes and subplots of every novel.  For example, in Valeska, there is a strong mystery about who Leila is.  Leila is a woman, who in Valeska, becomes enamored of the agent, George.  Leila is also an agent, and an agent from the super secret office, Stele.  The mystery of Stele and the mystery of who are the agents in Stele all drive parts of the plot in Valeska.  The point is that mystery is always entertaining and should be used in any novel to increase the entertainment.  The method of this revelation (providing mystery) is accomplished through showing.

More tomorrow.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 83, more Entertaining Characters, Developing Storyline Rising Action

25 September 2014, Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 83, more Entertaining Characters, Developing Storyline Rising Action

Announcement: I received the proofs a few days ago and completed my notes on them within the three day deadline.  The title of the series is Ancient Light and is based on my novel Aegypt.  The next two novels will be Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  They will be published individually and as a 3 in 1 book.  The initial cover is already developed, and you can see it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my new novel, Valeska, is: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

Here is my proposed cover for Valeska.  I decided on a white cover style.

You can see more at www.GoddessofDarkness.com.

Novels where the characters determine or discover their skills as a part of the story are usually called discovery themes or discovery plots.  As I mentioned, I think this type of theme and character has not been used enough in adult novels.  I use it very often as a theme or a sub theme.  Alternately, a theme or character that accomplishes self discovery is also an entertaining theme or character.  In this type of theme, the character does not know his or her origins or affiliations and through the novel discovers them.
A similar theme and character mix is a revelation theme.  I used a revelation (discovery) theme in my novel,  Dana-ana.  In a revelation theme, the revelation of the character is part of the mystery to the other characters (and usually the reader) in the novel.  I like all these types of themes and characters.

Again, the point is to develop entertaining characters–especially for your protagonist, antagonist, and protagonist’s helper.  A character with a mystery or who is discovering some skill can be a very entertaining character.  The surprise discovery type character has been overused in many young adult novels.  This is a character characterized by discovering a skill while under some extreme physical or mental challenge.  These have typically been fantasy or science fiction novels.  For example, a character who discovers they have a magical or psionic ability.  These tend to look like deus ex machine to me.  As I mentioned, these are typically found in young adult novels.  A more adult and interesting theme, to me, is where a character discovers a skill or ability and then builds on that skill or ability.  I used this type of protagonist in my novel, Warrior of Light.  In this novel, the protagonist who was basically a wimp and an intellectual discovers he is a warrior and wants to become a modern warrior who is an intellectual.  Okay, that’s not all of the novel, but it is a sub theme.

More tomorrow.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 82, Entertaining Characters, Developing Storyline Rising Action

24 September 2014, Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 82, Entertaining Characters, Developing Storyline Rising Action

Announcement: I received the proofs a few days ago and completed my notes on them within the three day deadline.  The title of the series is Ancient Light and is based on my novel Aegypt.  The next two novels will be Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  They will be published individually and as a 3 in 1 book.  The initial cover is already developed, and you can see it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my new novel, Valeska, is: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

Here is my proposed cover for Valeska.  I decided on a white cover style.

You can see more at www.GoddessofDarkness.com.

Once you have an entertaining and hopefully a unique theme statement, the next step in writing a novel is to develop the characters.  I won’t go back through the complete character development process, but I’ll look at the aspects of entertainment and excitement in character development.

The question then is what kinds of characters are entertaining.  It might be worthwhile to ask what kinds of characters are not entertaining.  These are kind of trick questions because almost any character can be made entertaining; however, some characters are easier to entertain with than others.  Many times, the power of entertaining is when a character (hopefully the protagonist) changes within the novel.  For the greatest entertainment factor, a character should change from ineffectual (or the appearance of ineffectual) to effectual.  This goes directly back to the idea of a pathetic (pathos filled) character.
Again, a pathetic character isn’t one who is disdainful or distained, but rather, one who evokes emotions in your readers.  A character who evokes emotions is an entertaining character.  An entertaining plot is one where a pathetic character goes from ineffectual to effectual.  For example, one of the most underused adult themes, but overused young adult themes is that of character self discovery.  Character self discovery is when a character who is ineffectual and deemed by others to be incapable discovers some talent or skill that they can develop to become effectual.  Some of the most entertaining novels with this theme are the discovery of magic or psionic capabilities.  Other similar novels reveal a self discovery of an athletic or martial skill.  These are more popular in young adult novels because they fit a young adult and school setting.  I think they are unplowed ground for adult novels.

More tomorrow.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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