Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 24, more Action in The Initial Scene

28 July 2014, Vampire Novel, part 24, more Action in The Initial Scene

Announcement: There is action on my new novels.  The publisher renamed the series–they are still working on the name.  I provided suggestions as did one of my prepub readers. Now the individual books will be given single names: Leora, Leila, Russia, Lumiere’, China, Sveta, and Klava–at least these are some of the suggestions.  They are also working on a single theme for the covers.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of this new novel is: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

The agent was shot, and he is dying.  Our vampire asks the obvious question: may I dine on your blood.  For there to  be a future relationship and a future for George at all, he must answer yes.  There is some back and forth between them, but mostly the vampire wants to eat (and live), and the agent is ready to give up his life.  He doesn’t want to, but when you are leaking your blood out and you are an hour away from help, you know you are going to die.

You can guess the answer: the agent tells her that she can drink his blood, and she leaves him a gift.  Remember that I set up my world such that a vampire can make a vampire by killing them through taking their blood then putting in some of the vampire’s own special blood.  What would happen if a vampire gave some of their blood to a living person–I posit that they would not become a vampire, but they would be healed.  That is exactly what happens.  The vampire drinks the agent’s blood, but then gives back some of her own blood to him.  The result is that he doesn’t die.  He is also touched by the grave, but that is an entirely different problem.

More tomorrow.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 23, Action in The Initial Scene

27 July 2014, Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 23, Action in The Initial Scene

Announcement: There is action on my new novels.  The publisher renamed the series–they are still working on the name.  I provided suggestions as did one of my prepub readers. Now the individual books will be given single names: Leora, Leila, Russia, Lumiere’, China, Sveta, and Klava–at least these are some of the suggestions.  They are also working on a single theme for the covers.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of this new novel is: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

Self evident action in this initial scene is the meeting of the agent and the vampire; however, this is not how I wrote it.  The scene I wanted to produce was a pathetic one (one filled with emotion).  The agent was sent on the mission alone because it was supposed to be a simple meeting and connection.  The reality was that the agent was ambushed by those he was supposed to meet.  Before he meets the vampire, he is shot through the chest, and that begins the entire theme and plot of the novel.

The vampire happened to be hunting the same person as the agent.  She happened to be in the alley when the agent is shot.  Can you see the picture?  That is the setting and the stage I write in the initial scene.  Our starving vampire is still starving–the agent chased away her prey, but she is still hungry and now his blood is being wasted on the dark cobblestones.  What other question could she ask: may I dine on your blood.  She has to ask the question because of the design feature I placed in my vampires: since vampires are repelled by the cross, they are equally unable to attack cross-bearers (Christians).  The agent happens to be a Christian.  She, therefore must ask, and he must give her that permission.

More tomorrow.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 22, more The Initial Scene

26 July 2014, Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 22, more The Initial Scene

Announcement: There is action on my new novels.  The publisher renamed the series–they are still working on the name.  I provided suggestions as did one of my prepub readers. Now the individual books will be given single names: Leora, Leila, Russia, Lumiere’, China, Sveta, and Klava–at least these are some of the suggestions.  They are also working on a single theme for the covers.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of this new novel is: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

You don’t need backstory to introduce and describe characters–all you need to do is describe the characters and the action.  When I write “describe the characters,” I mean physically–show and don’t tell.  Therefore, when I describe the vampire girl, she looks like she is a malnourished fifteen year old who is wearing a soiled party dress.  I do give a little more–her eyes are strange, she has fangs, and a long pointed tongue.  Still, seeing her, I don’t tell you she is a vampire–that would be telling.

The protagonist is a man on a mission.  Only a little information here.  He was sent to meet with an Eastern European due to his language skills.  His office asked for the work because of his language skills and from a Polish Police request.  The man is an agent.  I don’t tell you that either–that would be telling.  Instead, I describe a man who is packing and using a night vision goggle past midnight.

This is the setup: a man who is obviously on some type of police mission and a hunting vampire.  Their meeting is a part of the action in the initial scene.

More tomorrow.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 21, The Initial Scene

25 July 2014, Vampire Novel, part 21, The Initial Scene

Announcement: There is action on my new novels.  The publisher renamed the series–they are still working on the name.  I provided suggestions as did one of my prepub readers. Now the individual books will be given single names: Leora, Leila, Russia, Lumiere’, China, Sveta, and Klava–at least these are some of the suggestions.  They are also working on a single theme for the covers.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of this new novel is: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

The ways to submarine your initial scene are a prologue, a non-action initial scene, an initial scene that is backstory.

In my vampire novel, the obvious initial scene is the meeting between the protagonist and the protagonist’s helper (the agent and the vampire).  As I mentioned before, the protagonist is a British agent from “the organization” and the protagonist’s helper is a vampire.  In accordance with my definitions for a vampire, the vampire, Valeska is out hunting on a night with a full moon.  She isn’t a very good hunter because her master previously had hunted for her.  She was kept like a pet because of her unnatural beauty.  She was made a vampire because of her beauty and her evil.

All this is backstory.  You don’t get any of it in the initial scene.  What you see in the initial scene is a girl who looks fifteen who is wearing a horribly dirty white and pink party dress.  The dress has blood spatters and years worth of graves and dirt ground into it.  The girl is a malnourished vampire.  She isn’t malnourished because she is trying to save humans–she is malnourished because she is a poor hunter and she has no money.  Part of the backstory, that you learn later in the novel, is that her vampire master failed to return to his home and that left her and the other vampires with a problem.  When the house went up for sale, they had no place to go.  She was the least proficient and most coddled vampire and has not succeeded well on the street.  None of this, except the description is in the initial scene.

More tomorrow.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 20, and even more Submarining Your Initial Scene

24 July 2014, Vampire Novel, part 20, and even more Submarining Your Initial Scene

Announcement: There is action on my new novels.  The publisher renamed the series–they are still working on the name.  I provided suggestions as did one of my prepub readers. Now the individual books will be given single names: Leora, Leila, Russia, Lumiere’, China, Sveta, and Klava–at least these are some of the suggestions.  They are also working on a single theme for the covers.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of this new novel is: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

The ways to submarine your initial scene are a prologue, a non-action initial scene, an initial scene that is backstory.

The easiest way to kill the action in an initial scene is to include too much backstory.  The initial scene s no place for backstory.  You should always leap into the novel with both feet and start with setting and action.  The action can include conversation, but not too much.  In your action and setting, you can place some little tidbits of backstory, but even then, I think it is backstory telling technique to put in too much backstory at all.  Following the initial scene, you should be able to make the entire storyline, including the backstory, come alive in the conversation of the characters.

With solitary characters, it is possible to have them reminisce during breakfast or to contemplate the past at dinner.  But do it in the second and later scenes.  I made the mistake of putting too much backstory in the initial scene of my novel, Aegypt.  I was following the advice of my mentor, but I should have followed my instincts and left the novel as was is with the backstory in the later scenes.  My mentor, in writing novels, liked to write in an older style and wanted to put the full character setting and description at the beginning. I can accept character description in the initial scene, but not backstory.  From experience, I can assure you, you all the time in the world to write all the elements of the backstory you wish in the rising action.  So, don’t put much backstory in your initial scene–just enough to set and bring sense to the scene.

More tomorrow.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 19, even more Submarining Your Initial Scene

23 July 2014, Vampire Novel, part 19, even more Submarining Your Initial Scene

Announcement: There is action on my new novels.  The publisher renamed the series–they are still working on the name.  I provided suggestions as did one of my prepub readers. Now the individual books will be given single names: Leora, Leila, Russia, Lumiere’, China, Sveta, and Klava–at least these are some of the suggestions.  They are also working on a single theme for the covers.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of this new novel is: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

The ways to submarine your initial scene are a prologue, a non-action initial scene, an initial scene that is backstory.

In my opinion, action equals energy.  There is no novel that has no action–even the most intellectual novel will have some degree of action.  I’ll go further, action propels every novel.  Without some action or threat of action, there is no reason for a novel.

I’m trying to think of novels without any or much action–I can’t think of any.  I’m trying to think of examples of low grade action in novels–I can’t think of any.  Action of some kind envelops and infuses every novel.  A novel like the history: The Diary of Anne Frank is defined by suppressed action and the climax is the action of an attack.  Suppressed action defines such a book and gives wings to the intellectual parts of it.  In a similar novel, The Book Thief, the action is the novel and defines the novel.  There is no relief from the driving beat of warfare and threat of death.  Most novels are similar to this.  I would argue that most novels are propelled by some degree of action.  Since I’ve been writing about the first scene–that action must propel and define the initial scene.

Action will also define and propel the climax.  If you had no other action in your novel, it should be in the initial scene and the climax.  These two parts are never intellectual.  If you find a great novel where they are, I’d like to see it.  Action must define these two parts.  In most novels, you will find that action propels the entire novel and especially the rising action.  Just think of most novels, the movement and actions of the characters is what propels the rising action.  In the rising action, the action builds to the climax.  But the two highest action points of the novel are the initial scene and the climax.  The point is this, make certain your initial scene (and climax) is high action.

More tomorrow.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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Writing Ideas – Vampire Novel, part 18, yet more Submarining Your Initial Scene

22 July 2014, Vampire Novel, part 18, yet more Submarining Your Initial Scene

Announcement: There is action on my new novels.  The publisher renamed the series–they are still working on the name.  I provided suggestions as did one of my prepub readers. Now the individual books will be given single names: Leora, Leila, Russia, Lumiere’, China, Sveta, and Klava–at least these are some of the suggestions.  They are also working on a single theme for the covers.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of this new novel is: An agent of the organization becomes involved with a vampire girl during a mission, she becomes dependent on the agent, and she is redeemed.

The ways to submarine your initial scene are a prologue, a non-action initial scene, an initial scene that is backstory.

What you want from your initial scene is to set the novel, to introduce the main characters, to introduce the theme, and to bring the reader directly into the action (plot and storyline).  I can still achieve this and submarine my initial scene by not making it a powerful scene.  There are potentially many reasons for this.  The first is picking a point outside the action.  I made this mistake in The End of Honor.  I’ve already confessed the problems of the initial scenes of some of my published novels.  I made the mistake of not having this as an action scene and by brining in backstory.  The novel also has a prologue.  So I’m breaking all my recommendations to you.  You might ask how the novel was published–the novel has redeeming characteristics, but it was one of the first novels I wrote.  It is a good novel, but I’ve grown as a writer and a novelist.  The quality and understanding of writing you have at your twenty-third novel is much different than at your third novel.  I have improved as a novelist and as a writer.  My earlier novels are still good novels, but I’ve learned even better how to write and how to put together a great novel.

Now, as to action.  If you bring the protagonist and the antagonist together or the protagonist and the protagonist’s helper, you will have action.  It is possible to have intellectual action, but I’m not into novels like that.  You should have some degree of real action.  When we get to it, I’ll use my vampire novel as an example of the action in the initial scene.

More tomorrow.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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