Interlude – more Khione

24 April 2014, Interlude – more Khione

Announcement: There is action on my new novels.  The publisher renamed the series–they are still working on the name.  I provided suggestions as did one of my prepub readers. Now the individual books will be given single names: Leora, Leila, Russia, Lumiere’, China, Sveta, and Klava–at least these are some of the suggestions.  They are also working on a single theme for the covers.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

 

Khione, my new novel, follows with my other Enchantment novels.  They haven’t been published yet, but they also build on the ideas presented in Aegypt.  Th Aegypt novels are a set of eight interrelated books concerning two unknown Egyptian tombs and the ramification of their discovery in 1926.  My Aegypt novels are either on contract with my publisher or are in consideration, and my publisher has already given me a couple emails that they want the entire series.  They are currently working on the overall marketing of the novels.  I don’t really like -ogies.  I like true series.  A true series is a set of novels that are interrelated, but each novel is a whole and complete.  You can read each novel in the series without reference to the others, but if you read the series, you can be happy with the continuity and the characters.

My Enchantment novels are not really a series at all.  If anything, they are a series on a theme.  The theme is similar, but the plots and characters are not.  In Khione, I didn’t originally intend for the novel to follow Hestia, but it just worked out that way.  The characters and the plot fit perfectly into the world and the ideas of Hestia.  They did so well, I went back to Hestia and added the two special characters in Khione, into Hestia.  They and their names appear for just a moment, but enough to create continuity across the novels.  I didn’t have to add them into Hestia, it just made since to fit them in with their descriptions.  My publisher has shown an interest in the Enchantment novels, and I hope they will contract Hestia and KhioneKhione may be a difficult sell.  It is a very complex and edgy novel about the negatives of modern morality, but it is set within that modern morality.

More tomorrow.

Also remember, I’m trying to show you and give you examples of how to write a science fiction theme statement and turn it into a plot.

A note from one of my readers:  Speaking of which, I am awaiting for you to write a detailed installment on identifying, and targeting your audience, or audiences…ie, multi-layered story, for various audiences…like CS Lewis did. Just a thought.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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Interlude – Khione

23 April 2014, Interlude – Khione

Announcement: There is action on my new novels.  The publisher renamed the series–they are still working on the name.  I provided suggestions as did one of my prepub readers. Now the individual books will be given single names: Leora, Leila, Russia, Lumiere’, China, Sveta, and Klava–at least these are some of the suggestions.  They are also working on a single theme for the covers.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

 

I just finished writing my 22nd novel, Khione: Enchantment of the Fox.  I haven’t put up a website for the novel yet, and I haven’t finished the marketing materials.  I’m working on them now.  I did send a copy to a couple of prepublication readers.  I heard back and made corrections to the manuscript.

Khione is a really fun and a very serious novel.  It is a follow-on to Hestia and fits in the Enchantment novels.  It is a stand-alone novel.  I set it at Boston University, one of my alma maters.  This was for thematic and not just locational reasons.  The novel fits in the unique space I’ve been defining my novels, but it has some philosophical twists like Hestia.  The novel asks some very difficult questions about God and modern morality–that’s why I set it on a modern college campus.  It is a fun story and a very unusual one.  Still, my prepublication reader liked it, and she is very difficult to please.

Khione is the protagonist’s helper and a being out of my current novel themes and plots.  This means she is a demigoddess of some type.  Pearce, the protagonist, is a hardworking ethical graduate student at the University.  A large part of the novel is a revelation theme.  It is centered around the mystery of just who Khione is.  The second part of the novel is based on just what it means that Khione is who she is.  Like most of my novels, the conversations drive the plot and the action simply punctuates the storyline.  In general, the fun of the novel is in the situations and the conversations.  How interesting is it to speak to a person, like Khione, who is out of time.

More tomorrow.

Also remember, I’m trying to show you and give you examples of how to write a science fiction theme statement and turn it into a plot.

A note from one of my readers:  Speaking of which, I am awaiting for you to write a detailed installment on identifying, and targeting your audience, or audiences…ie, multi-layered story, for various audiences…like CS Lewis did. Just a thought.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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Writing Ideas – Writing Science Fiction, part 180 Extrapolating Military Technology, even more Simulation

22 April 2014, Writing Ideas – Writing Science Fiction, part 180 Extrapolating Military Technology, even more Simulation

Announcement: There is action on my new novels.  The publisher renamed the series–they are still working on the name.  I provided suggestions as did one of my prepub readers. Now the individual books will be given single names: Leora, Leila, Russia, Lumiere’, China, Sveta, and Klava–at least these are some of the suggestions.  They are also working on a single theme for the covers.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

I am writing about the extrapolation of science and technology to be able to write science fiction.  I made the point that it is almost meaningless to try to fully extrapolate a universe (world) that is 10,000 years in the future (and maybe 1,000 years in the future) without applying some cultural and technological shaping.

By shaping the cultures of your science fiction universe, you can shape the science and technology that is extrapolated.  Here is how I culturally shaped the universe of The Chronicles of the Dragon and the Fox to make the 10,000 year extrapolation work.

The major areas in warfare technology are:
1.  Software
2.  Weapons
3.  Countermeasures
4.  Defense
5.  Communications
6.  Robots
7.  Vehicles
8.  Environments (personal equipment)
9. Costs

Simulators and simulations are much more expensive than many imagine–especially simulations that play well with each other.  First, you need the equipment.  For a fighter aircraft, that isn’t so difficult–generally, all an aircraft has to do is fly around in the sky.  This is a relatively simple problem compared to a ground based simulation where small things like bushes, trees, rocks, vehicles, people, etc. need to be simulated.  If we simulate ground and air based vehicles, the simulator can be virtual–that is, I don’t need a cockpit, I need to simulate a cockpit.  In a virtual simulation, the pilot or vehicle operator just needs to don a helmet with a display inside.  However, then you must also simulate the cockpit–that adds complexity.  It also helps to have tactile simulation–we haven’t gone very far down that path, yet.

Simulation already looks difficult, and as described above, is not yet possible.  Extrapolated, it will happen.  The simulation equipment will be virtual and include, at least, visual, tactile, olfactory, and hearing.  More advanced simulators will include taste, but military training ones will not.  The second part is the simulation.  So, first the simulators and then the simulation.

More tomorrow.

Also remember, I’m trying to show you and give you examples of how to write a science fiction theme statement and turn it into a plot.

A note from one of my readers:  Speaking of which, I am awaiting for you to write a detailed installment on identifying, and targeting your audience, or audiences…ie, multi-layered story, for various audiences…like CS Lewis did. Just a thought.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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Writing Ideas – Writing Science Fiction, part 179 Extrapolating Military Technology, yet more Simulation

21 April 2014, Writing Ideas – Writing Science Fiction, part 179 Extrapolating Military Technology, yet more Simulation

Announcement: There is action on my new novels.  The publisher renamed the series–they are still working on the name.  I provided suggestions as did one of my prepub readers. Now the individual books will be given single names: Leora, Leila, Russia, Lumiere’, China, Sveta, and Klava–at least these are some of the suggestions.  They are also working on a single theme for the covers.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

I am writing about the extrapolation of science and technology to be able to write science fiction.  I made the point that it is almost meaningless to try to fully extrapolate a universe (world) that is 10,000 years in the future (and maybe 1,000 years in the future) without applying some cultural and technological shaping.

By shaping the cultures of your science fiction universe, you can shape the science and technology that is extrapolated.  Here is how I culturally shaped the universe of The Chronicles of the Dragon and the Fox to make the 10,000 year extrapolation work.

The major areas in warfare technology are:
1.  Software
2.  Weapons
3.  Countermeasures
4.  Defense
5.  Communications
6.  Robots
7.  Vehicles
8.  Environments (personal equipment)
9. Costs

 

One of the main reasons the military has not moved more into simulation is that simulating warfare requires multiple simulators and multiple actors.  The cost and the complexity of simulating a whole world for one person is very high–the cost and complexity of putting a whole force on line is also high, but nothing compared to trying to simulate the world.  The problem becomes integration and equipment.  In other words, if I take a whole task force and put them in their individual integrated simulators, I only need to simulate the factors and elements outside the task force.  The cost is the simulation, the integration, and the simulators.  On the other hand, if I simulate the entire task force, and I can simulate an individual’s experience in the task force–I only need one simulator, but it has to be a really great simulator.  The military doesn’t want either cost and the cost of both is high.  With improving simulations and lowering simulator costs, eventually, the cost curves will move toward simulation.

I’m not sure if the above gives as clear a picture as necessary–let me give another example.  If we simulate a single aircraft, the crew can fly a mission and the simulator instructor can simulate all the agencies and the communications.  The simulator can simulate the potential problems of the aircraft.  What the simulator, today, will not do is the external agencies, the scenarios, the communications, the enemy actions, the battle situation, or other aircraft interaction.  If I add an integrated second aircraft simulator, I can simulate (actual) formation and operations, but I’ve added the complexity of another simulator.  If I add an air traffic controller, I’ve added another simulator into the mix.  The need for simulators increase or the need for simulations increase–both cost money.  The main problem is equipment, that is the simulators themselves.

More tomorrow.

Also remember, I’m trying to show you and give you examples of how to write a science fiction theme statement and turn it into a plot.

A note from one of my readers:  Speaking of which, I am awaiting for you to write a detailed installment on identifying, and targeting your audience, or audiences…ie, multi-layered story, for various audiences…like CS Lewis did. Just a thought.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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Writing Ideas – Writing Science Fiction, part 178 Extrapolating Military Technology, more Simulation

20 April 2014, Writing Ideas – Writing Science Fiction, part 178 Extrapolating Military Technology, more Simulation

Announcement: There is action on my new novels.  The publisher renamed the series–they are still working on the name.  I provided suggestions as did one of my prepub readers. Now the individual books will be given single names: Leora, Leila, Russia, Lumiere’, China, Sveta, and Klava–at least these are some of the suggestions.  They are also working on a single theme for the covers.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

I am writing about the extrapolation of science and technology to be able to write science fiction.  I made the point that it is almost meaningless to try to fully extrapolate a universe (world) that is 10,000 years in the future (and maybe 1,000 years in the future) without applying some cultural and technological shaping.

By shaping the cultures of your science fiction universe, you can shape the science and technology that is extrapolated.  Here is how I culturally shaped the universe of The Chronicles of the Dragon and the Fox to make the 10,000 year extrapolation work.

The major areas in warfare technology are:
1.  Software
2.  Weapons
3.  Countermeasures
4.  Defense
5.  Communications
6.  Robots
7.  Vehicles
8.  Environments (personal equipment)
9. Costs

 

The military is slow to move to pure simulations in training because they reason very well that simulations don’t fully capture the elements of the battlefield–most specifically, they mean the “fog of war.”  The “fog of war” is the unexpected nature of warfare in the interaction of nature, the battlefield, human dynamics, and the enemy.  Von Clausewitz wrote about the “fog of war” in On War.  Modern simulations are improving, but they haven’t captured enough of the proper elements, yet, to provide the degree of combat training the military needs.  With time and improvements–especially the addition of chaos theory elements in the programing–simulations will gradually improve to the point that the military can use them routinely for training.

There are other elements to take into consideration.  At this moment, we are seeing the incorporation of technologies in the gaming environment that can potentially lead to more accurate and realistic simulations, but computing power, interfaces, and programming must improve significantly.  The elements in the simulations must look and feel like those in the real world–partial is good enough for flight simulators, but not for “world simulators.”  The difference is teaching procedures and teaching interaction in the world.  The world of a flight simulator only needs to be good enough to teach the procedures especially emergency procedures–in a world simulator, it isn’t learning known procedures, it is developing procedures and actions based on the individual circumstances of the moment.

More tomorrow.

Also remember, I’m trying to show you and give you examples of how to write a science fiction theme statement and turn it into a plot.

A note from one of my readers:  Speaking of which, I am awaiting for you to write a detailed installment on identifying, and targeting your audience, or audiences…ie, multi-layered story, for various audiences…like CS Lewis did. Just a thought.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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Writing Ideas – Writing Science Fiction, part 177 Extrapolating Military Technology, Simulation

19 April 2014, Writing Ideas – Writing Science Fiction, part 177 Extrapolating Military Technology, Simulation

Announcement: There is action on my new novels.  The publisher renamed the series–they are still working on the name.  I provided suggestions as did one of my prepub readers. Now the individual books will be given single names: Leora, Leila, Russia, Lumiere’, China, Sveta, and Klava–at least these are some of the suggestions.  They are also working on a single theme for the covers.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

I am writing about the extrapolation of science and technology to be able to write science fiction.  I made the point that it is almost meaningless to try to fully extrapolate a universe (world) that is 10,000 years in the future (and maybe 1,000 years in the future) without applying some cultural and technological shaping.

By shaping the cultures of your science fiction universe, you can shape the science and technology that is extrapolated.  Here is how I culturally shaped the universe of The Chronicles of the Dragon and the Fox to make the 10,000 year extrapolation work.

The major areas in warfare technology are:
1.  Software
2.  Weapons
3.  Countermeasures
4.  Defense
5.  Communications
6.  Robots
7.  Vehicles
8.  Environments (personal equipment)
9. Costs

 

To extrapolate future simulations and training, look to simulations and training today.  The future shouldn’t be much different–just better.  Today, aircraft are the only vehicles whose training significantly includes simulation.  We are seeing the beginnings of simulation in other vehicle training, and that will only increase in the future.  Vehicles will become simpler to operate, but training and the costs of operating the vehicles will become more.  Additionally, the cost and the difficulty of actual offensive and defensive operations will be significant.  That is, for firing weapons and in war games, simulation will become necessary.

Already there is some movement toward simulators in military training–not as much as you might think.  Most military training in aircraft has to do with procedures and aircraft operations, especially emergency procedures, not military training or military operations.  The reason for this is easy to understand.  Most aircraft are lost in training and emergencies not combat.  With more and better simulators, we will see aircraft training move more and more to simulation–that includes military operations.  In the civil community, we have already seen most aviation training move to simulation.  The military isn’t far behind.

More tomorrow.

Also remember, I’m trying to show you and give you examples of how to write a science fiction theme statement and turn it into a plot.

A note from one of my readers:  Speaking of which, I am awaiting for you to write a detailed installment on identifying, and targeting your audience, or audiences…ie, multi-layered story, for various audiences…like CS Lewis did. Just a thought.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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Writing Ideas – Writing Science Fiction, part 176 Extrapolating Military Technology, Training

18 April 2014, Writing Ideas – Writing Science Fiction, part 176 Extrapolating Military Technology, Training

Announcement: There is action on my new novels.  The publisher renamed the series–they are still working on the name.  I provided suggestions as did one of my prepub readers. Now the individual books will be given single names: Leora, Leila, Russia, Lumiere’, China, Sveta, and Klava–at least these are some of the suggestions.  They are also working on a single theme for the covers.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction:  I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon.  This was my 21st novel, and on this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing.  In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes.  You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel–start with http://ldalford.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/daemon-installment-1-the-incantation/.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published.  I’ll keep you informed along the way.  At this moment, I’m showing you the creative process I used to put together the novel.

Today’s Blog:  To see the steps in the publication process, go to my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

Here are my four rules (plus one) of writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your  writing.

I am writing about the extrapolation of science and technology to be able to write science fiction.  I made the point that it is almost meaningless to try to fully extrapolate a universe (world) that is 10,000 years in the future (and maybe 1,000 years in the future) without applying some cultural and technological shaping.

By shaping the cultures of your science fiction universe, you can shape the science and technology that is extrapolated.  Here is how I culturally shaped the universe of The Chronicles of the Dragon and the Fox to make the 10,000 year extrapolation work.

The major areas in warfare technology are:
1.  Software
2.  Weapons
3.  Countermeasures
4.  Defense
5.  Communications
6.  Robots
7.  Vehicles
8.  Environments (personal equipment)
9. Costs

 

There is much more we can write about extrapolating vehicles and we will get to it, but I thought it might be a good time to write about training.  I’ve written a lot about military training both current and future in my novels.  Many unfortunately are not published–yet.  Centurion will give you the basics of training Legionnaires during the first century, but that isn’t much help with current or future training–or is it.  If you remember, I wrote that to extrapolate you need to go backwards in time to understand technology and inventions.  If you look at the training of a Legionnaire in Centurion and current training, you can extrapolate future military training. 

One of the most important ideas in future training is simulations.  How far can and will simulations go?  I suspect we will see full world simulators eventually used for most military training.  What I mean by that is the trainee will don a full body suit or sim-chamber with a full simulation helmet.  The suit or chamber will give every feeling possible from heat to cold to injury.  The helmet will allow the trainee to experience every environment and situation.  The suit will allow the trainee to feel the weapons and everything else in the environment.  Eventually, nerve induction rather than a suit or chamber will be used.  Can you imagine the situation of such training.  Not everything in the environment will be programmed to the same degree.  You might be able to pick up a rock but not a pebble.  You might be able to touch a chair or a wall, but not a plant on the side of the road.    

More tomorrow.

Also remember, I’m trying to show you and give you examples of how to write a science fiction theme statement and turn it into a plot.

A note from one of my readers:  Speaking of which, I am awaiting for you to write a detailed installment on identifying, and targeting your audience, or audiences…ie, multi-layered story, for various audiences…like CS Lewis did. Just a thought.

I’ll repeat my published novel websites so you can see more examples: http://www.ldalford.com/, and the individual novel websites: http://www.aegyptnovel.com/, http://www.centurionnovel.com/, http://www.thesecondmission.com/, http://www.theendofhonor.com/, http://www.thefoxshonor.com/, and http://www.aseasonofhonor.com/.

Aksinya Cover Proposal
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