Writing – part x442, Developing Skills, Protagonist’s Helper, Example Freedom

17 June 2018, Writing – part x442, Developing Skills, Protagonist’s Helper, Example Freedom

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
  5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 28th novel, working title, School, potential title Deirdre: Enchantment and the School. The theme statement is: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

Here is the cover proposal for Deirdre: Enchantment and the School.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I continued writing my 29th novel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 28th novel, working title School.  If you noticed, I started on number 28, but finished number 29 (in the starting sequence—it’s actually higher than that).  I adjusted the numbering.  I do keep everything clear in my records.  I’m just finishing number 30, working title Detective.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 29:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 30:  Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker         

Today:  Many people would like to write, but writing is hard work.  I’ll express again, if you want to be a skilled and potentially a published author, you need to write about one million words.  That equates to about ten 100,000 word novels.  When you look at it this way, it is a daunting goal especially if you haven’t written a single novel.

To become a good writer, you need two specific skill sets first reading and then writing.  Without these skill sets, I really can’t help you much.  I provide advanced help and information on how to write great fiction.

Characters are the key to great writing.  Entertainment is the purpose of fiction writing.  The key to entertainment is character revelation.  If we want to be a successful writer, we must aim for great protagonists, and I would say, great protagonist’s helpers.

The protagonist’s helper is simply a character who is critical to the expression of the plot of the novel because the protagonist could not achieve the resolution of the internal or external telic flaw without that character.  I’ll provide some examples.

In my yet unpublished novel, Escape from Freedom, Scott Phillips is the protagonist and Reb is the protagonist’s helper.

This is a very unusual novel and a very unusual relationship.  First, the world of the novel is a colony planet.  On this planet, one of the nations created itself as a communist system.  The system is horribly unjust and Orwellian from our standpoint.  The people produce products until the value of their work declines below the value of their bodies—then they go to the hospital to be salvaged for parts.

Scott crash lands on the island nation of freedom and Reb is the first person to greet him.  She also hides him from the armed citizens and the party members.  Reb has a purpose that she will tell no one–she wants to escape freedom.  She doesn’t know if there is anything better, but she wants something better.  Scott’s tales of his nation and true freedom encourages her to want to escape even more.

Now here is the rub.  Scott has no idea the extent of Reb’s desire.  Reb has no idea if Scott will really keep his promise to her.  They have strong reasons to completely distrust and yet to trust one another.  Reb has known nothing more than the nation of Freedom.  There is no trust and no honor in Freedom.  Scott is not a pure soul.  He wants to escape and return to his own land.  His motives are not pure, and neither are Reb’s.  Yet, they can be protagonist and protagonist’s helper.

They are intimate players in the novel and intimate partners, but at the same time, they speak a completely different language and experience.  The intimacy and openness of their conversation comes from their mutual desire to escape.  Nothing else really binds them together.  They communicate with each other because they must to escape and to succeed—to survive.

This is a special case of a protagonist’s helper.  Instead of a simple companion, we have a very complex and dangerous relationship.  The characters still can converse on an intimate level, but there is always an undercurrent of secrecy—just as the secrecy of the nation of Freedom.

I have another pair like this in my Ghost Ship Chronicles.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing – part x441, Developing Skills, Protagonist’s Helper, Example Lilly

16 June 2018, Writing – part x441, Developing Skills, Protagonist’s Helper, Example Lilly

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
  5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 28th novel, working title, School, potential title Deirdre: Enchantment and the School. The theme statement is: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

Here is the cover proposal for Deirdre: Enchantment and the School.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I continued writing my 29th novel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 28th novel, working title School.  If you noticed, I started on number 28, but finished number 29 (in the starting sequence—it’s actually higher than that).  I adjusted the numbering.  I do keep everything clear in my records.  I’m just finishing number 30, working title Detective.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 29:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 30:  Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker         

Today:  Many people would like to write, but writing is hard work.  I’ll express again, if you want to be a skilled and potentially a published author, you need to write about one million words.  That equates to about ten 100,000 word novels.  When you look at it this way, it is a daunting goal especially if you haven’t written a single novel.

To become a good writer, you need two specific skill sets first reading and then writing.  Without these skill sets, I really can’t help you much.  I provide advanced help and information on how to write great fiction.

Characters are the key to great writing.  Entertainment is the purpose of fiction writing.  The key to entertainment is character revelation.  If we want to be a successful writer, we must aim for great protagonists, and I would say, great protagonist’s helpers.

The protagonist’s helper is simply a character who is critical to the expression of the plot of the novel because the protagonist could not achieve the resolution of the internal or external telic flaw without that character.  I’ll provide some examples.

In my yet unpublished novel, Lilly: Enchantment and the Computer, Dane is the protagonist’s helper.  He is a friend, companion, helper, and lover to Lilly.

First, about Lilly.  Lilly is a super genius in math and computers who is living on the street to be able to use her scholarship to go to the school of her choice.  She in an introverted person who is still vibrant and positive.  She just keeps clear of people because she is used to the street.  Because she keeps in a state of stink and unhygienicness on purpose, she doesn’t have any friends, and she intentionally keeps herself like a pig to dissuade the men on the street.  Thus, when Dane gives Lilly positive attention, she becomes enamored of him.

Lilly, the dirty begins to bathe and comb her hair.  She doesn’t have a brush, so Dane buys her one.  She needs money, so Dane gets her a job.  She needs some legal help, Dane enlists his lawyer parents.  Without Dane’s realization, he has become an idol in Lilly’s eyes.

Dane is likewise clueless about girls.  His sister has intentionally protected him from girls, not for herself, but because she knows too much about “girls.”  So, Lilly is becoming enamored of Dane, and Dane has no idea.  Dane’s sister Ophelia knows exactly what is going on.

We have Dane set up as Lilly’s protagonist’s helper.  You can see, he, at this moment, is not in love with her, but he is growing to love her.  The problem is that neither know anything about love.  As a protagonist’s helper, Dane can reflect Lilly’s thoughts on many subjects back to her—thus we have a relationship of open mindedness.  If becomes even more open minded when Lilly and Dane must contend with his sister as well as other forces around them.

The point is this, with a protagonist’s helper character, the protagonist can tell her mind.  She can explain her thoughts and her emotions.  Lilly can express this directly with Dane.  Likewise, Dane can express his thoughts and ideas with Lilly.  Woah, you might say, the revelation is supposed to be of the protagonist and not the protagonist’s helper.  This is absolutely true, however, the thoughts of the protagonist’s helper can relate and reveal those of the protagonist.  The better and stronger you can reveal the protagonist, the better and more powerful the novel.  The protagonist’s helper relates and reveals the protagonist in ways that are impossible without a protagonist’s helper.  We’ll look at opposing protagonist’s helpers from Escape from Freedom next.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing – part x440, Developing Skills, Protagonist’s Helper, Example Valeska

15 June 2018, Writing – part x440, Developing Skills, Protagonist’s Helper, Example Valeska

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
  5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 28th novel, working title, School, potential title Deirdre: Enchantment and the School. The theme statement is: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

Here is the cover proposal for Deirdre: Enchantment and the School.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I continued writing my 29th novel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 28th novel, working title School.  If you noticed, I started on number 28, but finished number 29 (in the starting sequence—it’s actually higher than that).  I adjusted the numbering.  I do keep everything clear in my records.  I’m just finishing number 30, working title Detective.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 29:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 30:  Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker         

Today:  Many people would like to write, but writing is hard work.  I’ll express again, if you want to be a skilled and potentially a published author, you need to write about one million words.  That equates to about ten 100,000 word novels.  When you look at it this way, it is a daunting goal especially if you haven’t written a single novel.

To become a good writer, you need two specific skill sets first reading and then writing.  Without these skill sets, I really can’t help you much.  I provide advanced help and information on how to write great fiction.

Characters are the key to great writing.  Entertainment is the purpose of fiction writing.  The key to entertainment is character revelation.  If we want to be a successful writer, we must aim for great protagonists, and I would say, great protagonist’s helpers.

The protagonist’s helper is simply a character who is critical to the expression of the plot of the novel because the protagonist could not achieve the resolution of the internal or external telic flaw without that character.  I’ll provide some examples.

In my unpublished novel, Valeska: Enchantment and the Vampire, George Mardling is the protagonist, and Valeska is the protagonist’s helper.  Valeska is also a vampire whose given name is Heidi.

I’ll recommend that you not follow fads, but Valeska is not your modern vampire novel.  You should be able to tell that from my statement above.  Valeska is the protagonist’s helper in the novel.  That should immediately alert you that something it up.  Further, Valeska or Heidi, as you like, is a real vampire cut from the inventor of the vampire, Bram Stoker.

Where Valeska is different as a vampire character is that in my universe vampires only need to hunt humans for blood during a full moon, a single bite isn’t enough to turn a person into a vampire, and obviously, a vampire can’t attack a cross-bearer.  These small variations aren’t as odd as you might thing.  In Dracula, the number of bites required to make someone into a vampire is ambivalent—it’s not stated specifically.  Also, Bram Stoker explained that vampires can’t abide crosses, but he missed or intentionally didn’t connect the dots that a person who was a cross-bearer, i.e. a Christian is supposed to be marked permanently with the sign of the cross at baptism.  If you address a spiritual concept like a vampire, you can’t just ignore other lore because you don’t like it.  Actually, writers do that all the time, and it drives me crazy.

In any case, Valeska is a classical vampire.  The point of bringing her up is that you should ask: how can a classical vampire become a protagonist’s helper?  I think this is a lovely part of the novel in every sense.  Valeska is a destitute vampire who was abandoned by her own and her maker.  She is a poor hunter, and her hunt is disturbed by George, who is a British spy.  George is critically wounded during an operation.  George is a cross-bearer, but he allows Valeska to dine because he thinks he is about to die.  Valeska gives George back his life, and now they are connected through this link.  For some reason, Valeska can’t hunt or dine on anyone else.

Now, George and Valeska are connected through this intimate association.  The how and the result was fun to write and to read—I hope this novel is published soon.  More than that, the intimate association allows Valeska to become a sounding board and intimate communique to George.  George can talk to Valeska about things he would never address with other humans.  Likewise, Valeska has never spoken her heart or about herself with anyone before.

There is the beauty of the protagonist’s helper and part of the allure of this novel in particular.  All novels are a revelation of the protagonist, but in many novels, like Valeska, other characters deserve and readers want to know about them.  It is extremely difficult to get to the revelation of a vampire without telling—with a vampire as the protagonist’s helper, it is simple.  Who doesn’t want to know the life and times of a vampire?  How else can you express this without telling?  You can when the protagonist and the protagonist’s helper are engaged in intimate conversation.  These ideas come out naturally as a result of their dialog.

Thus, back to my whole point of the protagonist’s helper.  The author can express an introspective and thinking protagonist because the protagonist’s helper is there to listen to their ideas and thoughts.  Likewise, the protagonist can hear something amazing from the mind of the protagonist’s helper.  The power of the use of the protagonist’s helper is amazing in the context of any novel.  That’s why I recommend using them.  Likewise, friendship and companionship play a major role in the protagonist’s helper.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing – part x439, Developing Skills, Protagonist’s Helper, Example Deirdre

14 June 2018, Writing – part x439, Developing Skills, Protagonist’s Helper, Example Deirdre

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
  5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 28th novel, working title, School, potential title Deirdre: Enchantment and the School. The theme statement is: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

Here is the cover proposal for Deirdre: Enchantment and the School.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I continued writing my 29th novel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 28th novel, working title School.  If you noticed, I started on number 28, but finished number 29 (in the starting sequence—it’s actually higher than that).  I adjusted the numbering.  I do keep everything clear in my records.  I’m just finishing number 30, working title Detective.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 29:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 30:  Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker         

Today:  Many people would like to write, but writing is hard work.  I’ll express again, if you want to be a skilled and potentially a published author, you need to write about one million words.  That equates to about ten 100,000 word novels.  When you look at it this way, it is a daunting goal especially if you haven’t written a single novel.

To become a good writer, you need two specific skill sets first reading and then writing.  Without these skill sets, I really can’t help you much.  I provide advanced help and information on how to write great fiction.

Characters are the key to great writing.  Entertainment is the purpose of fiction writing.  The key to entertainment is character revelation.  If we want to be a successful writer, we must aim for great protagonists, and I would say, great protagonist’s helpers.

The protagonist’s helper is simply a character who is critical to the expression of the plot of the novel because the protagonist could not achieve the resolution of the internal or external telic flaw without that character.  I’ll provide some examples.

In my unpublished novel, Deirdre: Enchantment and the School, Deirdre is the protagonist, and Sorcha is the protagonist’s helper.  Sorcha is the girl with the great secret in the novel.  She is the Fae child who is secretly attending Wycombe Abbey School for the purposes of an education.  How an intellectual person can’t love such a character, I don’t know.

I do know that Sorcha is nearly the perfect protagonist’s helper.  She was coerced by Deirdre to be her friend.  Her greatest fear is that she will be found out and revealed to the school.  Deirdre is very intelligent, but she is not as smart as Sorcha, and Deirdre is unusual by far.  She wants a friend, and she believes she has made Sorcha a friend, but Sorcha is all about keeping her secret.

My point is simply this—Sorcha is an intimate who is not intimate.  Deirdre believes she can share almost everything with Sorcha—well everything that isn’t a real secret of Deirdre’s.  Deirdre has her own secrets, and she is not about to share them with anyone, but Deirdre is willing and able to share mutual school related experiences with Sorcha.  Deirdre, the protagonist, shares her ideas and concerns with Sorcha—they converse, conspire, and company each other with Deirdre being able to express her introspection to Sorcha.

Deirdre’s introspection to Sorcha becomes the introspection and thinking expressed in the novel through showing and not telling.  On a deeper level, since Sorcha’s friendship is a coerced intimacy, Sorcha feels no compunction to reign in her own thoughts.  Thus you have a dynamic environment where the protagonist and the protagonist’s helper feel they can mutually express themselves to each other.  This is precisely the type of dialog you want in any novel.  Candid can only be candid as long as the characters believe they can express themselves freely and without fear of reprisal or indignity.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing – part x438, Developing Skills, more Protagonist’s Helper

13 June 2018, Writing – part x438, Developing Skills, more Protagonist’s Helper

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
  5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 28th novel, working title, School, potential title Deirdre: Enchantment and the School. The theme statement is: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

Here is the cover proposal for Deirdre: Enchantment and the School.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I continued writing my 29th novel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 28th novel, working title School.  If you noticed, I started on number 28, but finished number 29 (in the starting sequence—it’s actually higher than that).  I adjusted the numbering.  I do keep everything clear in my records.  I’m just finishing number 30, working title Detective.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 29:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 30:  Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker         

Today:  Many people would like to write, but writing is hard work.  I’ll express again, if you want to be a skilled and potentially a published author, you need to write about one million words.  That equates to about ten 100,000 word novels.  When you look at it this way, it is a daunting goal especially if you haven’t written a single novel.

To become a good writer, you need two specific skill sets first reading and then writing.  Without these skill sets, I really can’t help you much.  I provide advanced help and information on how to write great fiction.

Characters are the key to great writing.  Entertainment is the purpose of fiction writing.  The key to entertainment is character revelation.  If we want to be a successful writer, we must aim for great protagonists, and I would say, great protagonist’s helpers.

Dr. Watson is a classic sidekick type protagonist’s helper.  However, Dr. Watson is a bit more than our normal perception of a sidekick.  For example, the typical sidekick is a Tonto or a Chester—not that clever and certainly not a conversationalist.  Dr. Watson is supposed to be intelligent, but usually Holms is portrayed as the intellect, and Dr. Watson provides the sounding board to Holms’ ideas.  That’s cute, but it isn’t really what the protagonist’s helper can be or become.

In my latest novel, Lady Wishart, Lachlann Calloway is both Lady Wishart’s love interest and her protagonist’s helper.  Lachlann is very bright.  He is not a sidekick at all.  He provides her ideas, and he is a foil as much as a help.  In my novel, Lachlann’s purpose is to allow Lady Wishart to speak her mind and eventually heart.

In addition to Lachlann, I have a few other characters whom Lady Wishart can speak to privately.  One is Aife, the keeper of the Isle of Shadows Tea House, another is Miss Highgate and Acallia, and the other is the Queen.  Lady Wishart is not completely on intimate terms with any of these people, but she can speak to them about certain important subjects that could never be expressed to others.  Throughout the novel, Lady Wishart becomes closer and closer to Lachlann.

The protagonist’s helper is simply a character who is critical to the expression of the plot of the novels because the protagonist could not achieve the resolution of the internal or external telic flaw without that character.  I’ll provide more examples.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing – part x437, Developing Skills, Protagonist’s Helper

12 June 2018, Writing – part x437, Developing Skills, Protagonist’s Helper

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
  5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 28th novel, working title, School, potential title Deirdre: Enchantment and the School. The theme statement is: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

Here is the cover proposal for Deirdre: Enchantment and the School.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I continued writing my 29th novel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 28th novel, working title School.  If you noticed, I started on number 28, but finished number 29 (in the starting sequence—it’s actually higher than that).  I adjusted the numbering.  I do keep everything clear in my records.  I’m just finishing number 30, working title Detective.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 29:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 30:  Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker         

Today:  Many people would like to write, but writing is hard work.  I’ll express again, if you want to be a skilled and potentially a published author, you need to write about one million words.  That equates to about ten 100,000 word novels.  When you look at it this way, it is a daunting goal especially if you haven’t written a single novel.

To become a good writer, you need two specific skill sets first reading and writing.  Without these skill sets, I really can’t help you much.  I provide advanced help and information on how to write great fiction.

Characters are the key to great writing.  Entertainment is the purpose of fiction writing.  The key to entertainment is character revelation.  If we want to be a successful writer, we must aim for great protagonists, and I would say, great protagonist’s helpers.

If you want to show and not tell, but you want an independent and thinking protagonist, your protagonist needs an intimate companion and a close friend.  This is exactly what the protagonist’s helper is.

A protagonist’s helper is sometimes simplified as a sidekick, and, indeed, a sidekick is a type of protagonist’s helper.  Likewise, a lover is, or should be a protagonist’s helper.  The protagonist’s helper is a friend and companion.  It has been said of Japanese Manga (graphic novels) that all you need for a successful Manga is a school girl, her best friend, and a love interest.  I’m certain it isn’t that simple, but generally, it’s pretty true.

If you notice, the formula for the successful Manga includes a best friend, but the love interest barely gets a description.  The point is this, the protagonist’s introspection and thinking are expressed best in a graphic novel with conversation.  Like a movie, thought bubbles, though possible, are just silly page after page, plus, the entertainment in a novel or Manga is not just the thoughts and ruminations of the protagonist, the entertainment is the reflection of the thoughts and the ruminations through another friendly or not so friendly set of eyes.

The protagonist’s helper is some degree of a friend and a companion.  The protagonist’s helper must be able to achieve some degree of intimacy with the protagonist.  My writing is full of protagonist’s helpers.  I develop them with the fervor of developing the protagonist.  I consider the protagonist’s helper to be as important, to a degree, as the protagonist.  The reason is simply the ability to confer as equals and to reflect the inner thoughts of the protagonist.  I’ll give some examples, but for the moment, think Dr. Watson.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing – part x436, Developing Skills, The Ideas of the Protagonist

11 June 2018, Writing – part x436, Developing Skills, The Ideas of the Protagonist

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
  5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 28th novel, working title, School, potential title Deirdre: Enchantment and the School. The theme statement is: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

Here is the cover proposal for Deirdre: Enchantment and the School.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I continued writing my 29th novel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 28th novel, working title School.  If you noticed, I started on number 28, but finished number 29 (in the starting sequence—it’s actually higher than that).  I adjusted the numbering.  I do keep everything clear in my records.  I’m just finishing number 30, working title Detective.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 29:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 30:  Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker         

Today:  Many people would like to write, but writing is hard work.  I’ll express again, if you want to be a skilled and potentially a published author, you need to write about one million words.  That equates to about ten 100,000 word novels.  When you look at it this way, it is a daunting goal especially if you haven’t written a single novel.

To become a good writer, you need two specific skill sets first reading and writing.  Without these skill sets, I really can’t help you much.  I provide advanced help and information on how to write great fiction.

Characters are the key to great writing.  Entertainment is the purpose of fiction writing.  The key to entertainment is character revelation.  If we want to be a successful writer, we must aim for great protagonists, and I would say, great protagonist’s helpers.

We want introspective and thinking characters, but we don’t want to tell—we are in a quandary.  If you want to show and not tell, we can’t use the narrative to explain the mind of the protagonist.  Likewise, we can’t go into the mind of the protagonist.  Think about real life.  How does any person reveal their thoughts—through conversation, of course.

To show the introspection and mind of the protagonist, the author must enable the protagonist an opportunity to speak her inmost thoughts.  You can’t do this in an action sequence.  You can’t achieve this in a fight.  You can’t just throw this out.  You must put your characters into a situation where they can bare their hearts and minds—okay, just minds.

The how is up to you, but I’ll pass on some ideas.  The characters must be in a comfortable situation.  The setting must be intimate.  I’d recommend quiet and private.  A private dinner or lunch are always good for conversation.  The problem is to get the characters into this type of situation.  Some characters lend themselves well to communication and intimacy, but many if not most do not.  Novels are novels because there is some problem to be solved, a telic flaw.  With a telic flaw comes faults and problems.

The protagonist and the antagonist are always at odds.  The protagonist is usually at odds with some other characters.  Because romantic protagonists are individualists, they don’t usually make friends easily, and they usually have more followers than friends.  I know, I know, the protagonist isn’t at odds with everyone in the novel, but who are they going to open their mind to?  You can’t just have your protagonist speaking his mind to everyone he meets.  You need an intimate companion and a close friend.  This is exactly what the protagonist’s helper is.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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