Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 813, Climax Examples, Escape from Freedom

25 September 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 813, Climax Examples, Escape from Freedom

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

I’m writing about how to develop the climax of a novel. I’m giving examples from my published and yet to be published novels. I’ll try not to introduce spoilers. You can’t read some of these novels yet, but it’s worth writing about the process of developing the climax for them. I have two contracted novels Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness. These are supposed to be published in a three-in-one with Aegypt and individually. The economy has delayed their publication. These first three novels are called Ancient Light. They include Aegypt, Sister of Light, and Sister of Darkness. In addition to the Ancient Light novels, I’ve written some other novels.

My publisher labeled my Ancient Light novels dystopian. They are as dystopian as much as the history of WWII is dystopian. So I wrote a real dystopian novel, Escape from Freedom. Freedom is an island nation on a colony of earth. The economy of Freedom is based in socialism and a controlled economy. It is a “workers’ paradise.” The citizens produce goods. The armed citizens ensure order. The party members rule over all and are the consumers of all the goods. The citizens are provided food, shelter, clothing, sex, just about anything they could need. They are also drugged and controlled and are allowed to work until their value decreases too much—then they are harvested.

Freedom is not a nice place. Reb is a high value citizen in Freedom. Her greatest desire is to escape from Freedom. She doesn’t know anything else, but she knows there is something terribly wrong about Freedom.

Scott, a heavy lifting shuttle pilot accidently crash lands on Freedom. All the other nations are based in capitalism. Reb saves Scott and hides him from the armed citizens and party members. That begins their attempt to escape from Freedom.

Scott is the protagonist. His external telic flaw is that he wants to escape Freedom. His internal telic flaw is that he knows it is impossible for Reb to escape with him. You see the situation and the problem—Reb thinks Scott will take her away from Freedom. The truth is that this is impossible. The expected climax is that they will escape, but such a mutual escape is impossible. The expected climax becomes the unexpected climax. How we solve this is what makes a great plot a great plot. This is the power of the unexpected in the expected. The climax must also be resolved with action—in this novel, I give you plenty of action.

I’ll move to my science fiction unpublished novels. I’ll look at the Ghost Ship Chronicles. We’ll inspect Athelstan Cying next.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 812, Climax Examples, Antebellum

24 September 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 812, Climax Examples, Antebellum

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

I’m writing about how to develop the climax of a novel. I’m giving examples from my published and yet to be published novels. I’ll try not to introduce spoilers. You can’t read some of these novels yet, but it’s worth writing about the process of developing the climax for them. I have two contracted novels Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness. These are supposed to be published in a three-in-one with Aegypt and individually. The economy has delayed their publication. These first three novels are called Ancient Light. They include Aegypt, Sister of Light, and Sister of Darkness. In addition to the Ancient Light novels, I’ve written some other novels.

Antebellum fits as an enchantment novel, but it is different in a couple of ways. Although Antebellum does include enchantment (supernatural events and things), the protagonist is not in need of redemption. Redemption is a secondary theme in the novel. Also, although the secondary character, a house, does represent an unredeemable being, it represents an entire culture. On the other hand, that isn’t so different from Sorcha, where Shiggy is meant to represent a generation.

In any case, I haven’t renamed Antebellum to Heather: Enchantment and the House, but that might be a potential name for it. That would make nine Enchantment novels. I expect there will be more before I’m done. I’d like to see a publisher pick them up and run with them—oh well. Marketing is difficult.

Heather Sybil Roberts graduated from high school in 1965. She is trying to earn enough money to go to college. She almost has enough, but then she experiences Bellfleur, the plantation house that once belonged to her family. It disappeared at the end of the Civil War and hasn’t been seen since. Bellfleur calls Heather to enter and experience the history that went on inside the walls of the place. When Heather seeks the house, she can’t find it. It only can be found when it calls.

Heather is busy with her seven accounting jobs, and she is seeking to solve the mystery of Bellfleur. Bellfleur, on the other hand is reaching out of time to tell Heather something important about her culture and family.

We have Heather Sybil Roberts a dirt poor girl as our protagonist. Her external telic flaw is that she wants to go to college, but doesn’t have the means. Her internal telic flaw is the mystery of Bellfleur. The expected climax is that she will discover the mystery of Bellfleur and that she will be able to go to college. The problem with this climax is that Bellfleur is a mystery out of time. It isn’t something solvable within the constraints of normalcy. This is common to my writing, but this is also a more common theme than many of my novels. Notice, there is a very powerful conundrum defining this climax. Since the expected climax isn’t logically viable, there must be an unexpected resolution that solves the telic flaw. This resolution must be action based—and so it is.

I’m trying hard to give you clues to help you develop a proper climax without giving away spoilers for my novels. I really should have told all with Aksinya since I provided the novel in this blog. Just note, that as you develop a climax, head for the expected, but provide the unexpected. This is what makes a novel inviting, delicious, and memorable. People don’t regard the expected as great. The unexpected is the turning point that wows and intrigues.

I’ll move to my science fiction unpublished novels. We’ll look at Escape from Freedom first.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 811, Climax Examples, Sorcha

23 September 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 811, Climax Examples, Sorcha

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

I’m writing about how to develop the climax of a novel. I’m giving examples from my published and yet to be published novels. I’ll try not to introduce spoilers. You can’t read some of these novels yet, but it’s worth writing about the process of developing the climax for them. I have two contracted novels Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness. These are supposed to be published in a three-in-one with Aegypt and individually. The economy has delayed their publication. These first three novels are called Ancient Light. They include Aegypt, Sister of Light, and Sister of Darkness. In addition to the Ancient Light novels, I’ve written some very fun novels I call my enchantment novels. The eighth is Sorcha: Enchantment and the Curse.

Many of my novels include a covert intelligence theme. In Sorcha, I just take it to a higher level. The protagonist of Sorcha is Shiggy. Shiggy is a very intelligent woman who has been through every type of British intelligence training possible.   She has failed miserably at each. The problem with Shiggy is Shiggy—and something else. Shiggy is not an odd being or a creature, she is a human. There are odd beings and creatures all around her, but, at first, she is just a normal human. Shiggy’s character stands for all the bad things people currently imagine about millennials.

Sorcha takes Shiggy on as an intelligence training project. If she can’t turn the problem child into an effective agent, no one can. Thus begins the education of Shiggy. The problem with Shiggy, is not just her upbringing, but also her lineage. Shiggy is cursed. Still most of her problems are her own problems, but she does have this strange problem of a curse.

Shiggy’s telic flaw is that she is cursed. This doesn’t exactly mean what you might think it does, but the answer isn’t really to get rid of the curse. Still, the expected climax is that Shiggy gets rid of her curse. From the nature of the curse and any curse, we know this won’t happen. Thus, the expected climax can only have an unexpected resolution. This is again, the power of a theme that drives an impossible climax. I’ll note once more, the climax must have an action based resolution.

I think I’ve made myself clear, there is great power in a theme that has an expected climax that is not possible. This makes it possible for the author to either provide a reasoned means for the climax to become possible or to provide a very unexpected resolution—an unexpected climax. I’m in great favor of this. Many themes logically can’t have the expected climax—not without some kind of really powerful trick. We don’t want a deus ex machina, and we don’t want the invention of an imaginary world where such events can come true. For example, how much more powerful is it when I write: Shiggy’s curse can’t be broken—it is a part of her. The climax that breaks her curse also breaks her. That’s no good. On the other hand, the unexpected resolution that leaves the curse, but resolves her telic flaw—now, that is powerful. That isn’t to say, it might be possible for an author to develop a climax that solves Shiggy’s problem more directly. I just don’t like those kinds of climaxes, and I like my worlds to be much more developed and based in actual human affairs. The hopelessness of a person who has some kind of issue that they can’t repair is much more powerful when they overcome it, than one which is simply internal or based on bad habits (laziness, weakness, etc.). For example, if I wrote about a disabled person who overcomes their disabilities that is a much more powerful story than a fully able person who decides to work harder. My style is to present spiritual disabilities (vampire, shape-shifter, cursed, goddess, demi-goddess) those who are fated to be beings whom we would consider irredeemable who in some way find redemption. The fact that their fate is the problem provides a powerful motif for the unexpected resolution.

Another novel I’ve written is Antebellum.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 810, Climax Examples, Essie

22 September 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 810, Climax Examples, Essie

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

I’m writing about how to develop the climax of a novel. I’m giving examples from my published and yet to be published novels. I’ll try not to introduce spoilers. You can’t read some of these novels yet, but it’s worth writing about the process of developing the climax for them. I have two contracted novels Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness. These are supposed to be published in a three-in-one with Aegypt and individually. The economy has delayed their publication. These first three novels are called Ancient Light. They include Aegypt, Sister of Light, and Sister of Darkness. In addition to the Ancient Light novels, I’ve written some very fun novels I call my enchantment novels. The seventh is Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si.

I wrote before that the enchantment novels are in some ways experimental novels. In this regard, I am writing redemptive themes about creatures and beings we usually don’t think can ever be redeemed. In this novel, I wrote about a shape-shifter—the Aos Si. The Aos Si is a very unusual creature. It is not a werewolf. It is a creature steeped in ancient British lore.

Essie is a being abused and kept in a cage. She escapes and is raiding the kitchens in the Shire. Mrs. Lyons discovers Essie in her pantry and captures her. What Mrs. Lyons doesn’t know is that Essie is at war with the sovereign goddess of the Celtic lands. Essie is the Aos Si, and her place (position of authority) has been taken from her.

Essie’s external telic flaw is that she is at war with the chief goddess of the Celtic lands. She has lost her place. Her internal telic flaw is that she has lost her place (her authority). As the Aos Si, she controls the fae. The expected climax is that Essie retakes her place. To do this, she must confront and overcome the goddess of the Celtic lands, Ceridwen. The Aos Si can’t overcome anything. Her purpose is not to overcome, but to forgive. There is a conundrum that can’t be resolved logically. Since the expected climax can’t come about, the unexpected resolution is completely unexpected. It must include action, of course.

My next as yet uncontracted Enchantment novel is Sorcha: Enchantment and the Curse.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 809, Climax Examples, Lilly

21 September 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 809, Climax Examples, Lilly

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

I’m writing about how to develop the climax of a novel. I’m giving examples from my published and yet to be published novels. I’ll try not to introduce spoilers. You can’t read some of these novels yet, but it’s worth writing about the process of developing the climax for them. I have two contracted novels Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness. These are supposed to be published in a three-in-one with Aegypt and individually. The economy has delayed their publication. These first three novels are called Ancient Light. They include Aegypt, Sister of Light, and Sister of Darkness. In addition to the Ancient Light novels, I’ve written some very fun novels I call my enchantment novels. The sixth is Lilly: Enchantment and the Computer.

Lilly is a girl with many issues. She is a math genius who has a scholarship to Pacific Lutheran University. Unfortunately, her scholarship will pay for classes, but not for room and board. She chose Pacific Lutheran University because the Chancellor made a deal with her that she could take any class she wanted, and since all the money has gone for tuition, Lilly’s mother, a drug addict and prostitute, can’t take it from her. This, in a nutshell, is Lilly. There’s more. She can also program computers the way most people play a video game. She tricks out electronics. She also lives on the streets and steals food.

Dane, a graduate student, rescues Lilly when she is using a hacked password to buy food. Dane just wants to know more about this really smart girl—Lilly becomes infatuated with Dane. That’s just the setup. Lilly shares her meagre food with an old Japanese man and his cat. This Japanese man happens to be a Japanese kami (god). He is the kami for metal, is tired of life, and he wants to pass on his deity. The kami does pass his deity and skills to Lilly. Now Lilly has everything she could ever want—almost.

Lilly’s external telic flaw is she is an abused and abandoned person. Her internal telic flaw is she wants someone to love her. She’s found Dane, and Dane is interested, but he doesn’t know much about love either. You can guess the expected climax is somehow related to love, acceptance, and being a Japanese kami. You got it. The expected climax is not so obvious, this makes it a potential unexpected resolution. I’ll give you a hint, the other Japanese kamis are not happy with a human goddess among them. This has got to have action to resolve.

My next as yet uncontracted Enchantment novel is Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 808, Climax Examples, Valeska

20 September 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 808, Climax Examples, Valeska

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

I’m writing about how to develop the climax of a novel. I’m giving examples from my published and yet to be published novels. I’ll try not to introduce spoilers. You can’t read some of these novels yet, but it’s worth writing about the process of developing the climax for them. I have two contracted novels Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness. These are supposed to be published in a three-in-one with Aegypt and individually. The economy has delayed their publication. These first three novels are called Ancient Light. They include Aegypt, Sister of Light, and Sister of Darkness. In addition to the Ancient Light novels, I’ve written some very fun novels I call my enchantment novels. The fifth is Valeska: Enchantment and the Vampire.

I have written before, don’t write vampire novels, the theme has been overused, but I wrote a vampire novel. In defense, I wrote a novel about the potential redemption of a vampire. My vampire is a “real” vampire who conforms to the Bram Stoker creation. The only place that my vampires are different is that they must drink blood during the full moon—this is to prevent their disassociation. If humans are flesh, spirit, and soul (this is a classical Greek idea), then vampires are spirit and soul only. Their flesh is gone and the only the spirit (psuche) and soul (pneume) give them a semblance of existence. That is why sunlight and lack of blood during the full moon leads to their destruction. Otherwise, my vampires match all of the features of Bram Stoker’s vampires.

Now, with that out of the way, it might seem impossible to redeem a vampire—perhaps it is. My vampire was hunting during the full moon in Gdansk, Poland when she came upon another hunter. That other hunter was George Marding a British intelligence agent. George was shot by his prey, and Valeska asked for George’s blood—because George ruined her hunt. George gladly gave up his blood, and Valeska heals George. All would be well except now Valeska can’t hunt anyone except George. This novel includes all kinds of fun spy stuff , but the story fills with more problems when George is reassigned to Britain.

Valeska’s telic flaw is that she is a vampire. This is internal and external. The expected climax is that Valeska unbecomes a vampire, but this is not possible. That is, no one has conceived of a way to unturn a vampire–they are supposed to be dead. The expected climax is therefore not possible. This means the expected climax could be the unexpected resolution. This is an irony and a wonderful turn of plot. This is one of the concepts I’m exploring in my enchantment novels—that is, the impossible redemption or the impossible change in a specific creature’s condition. In the case of Valeska, this is the redemption of a vampire. If you look back, this started with the redemption of an ancient goddess (Hestia), the redemption of a sorceress who called a demon (Aksinya), the redemption of an abused Greek demi-goddess (Khione), and now the redemption of a vampire. When I write “redemption” the connotation of the word should be taken from a literary standpoint. This doesn’t necessarily mean salvation, but it can. These novels are classical stories of redemption—where a person changes from evil to good (for example). There is, of course, action involved with Valeska’s climax.

My next as yet uncontracted Enchantment novel is Lilly: Enchantment and the Computer.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 807, Climax Examples, Khione

19 September 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 807, Climax Examples, Khione

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

I’m writing about how to develop the climax of a novel. I’m giving examples from my published and yet to be published novels. I’ll try not to introduce spoilers. You can’t read some of these novels yet, but it’s worth writing about the process of developing the climax for them. I have two contracted novels Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness. These are supposed to be published in a three-in-one with Aegypt and individually. The economy has delayed their publication. These first three novels are called Ancient Light. They include Aegypt, Sister of Light, and Sister of Darkness. In addition to the Ancient Light novels, I’ve written some very fun novels I call my enchantment novels. They all have to do with enchantments. The forth is Khione: Enchantment and the Fox.

With my enchantment novels, I can explore new and creative ideas outside my normal writing. They’ve kind of become my normal writing lately. Khione is one of the enchantment novels that is tied directly to another of those novels. Khione works with characters developed in Hestia.

Khione is a demigod from Greece. She was offered her earth stuff at the end of Hestia which gave her control of her life and self. Unlike many other demigods who were offered their freedom, Khione is a wild being who decided to go to the United States to be free of her past. She lives like an animal in the streets. In fact, Khione in her mind is an animal. She has always been treated like an animal, and she thinks she will always be an animal. When she wasn’t free, she was a sexual slave. If her earth stuff is held by another, she must obey. This is true of all demigods.

Pearce, a graduate student at Boston University finds Khione. She is naked and comes out at night to hunt mostly cats. On one particular night, Khione is struck by a bus. Pearce isn’t sure what to do with a naked, cat-eating, girl, so he takes her home. Pearce puts her earth stuff—a Greek coin in his pocket. Thus begins the education of Khione and Pearce.

Khione is the protagonist. Her external telic flaw is she has always been a slave. Her internal telic flaw is she has always been a slave. This is a discovery novel. In this sense—the protagonist isn’t completely hiding who she is, but who would believe a dirty girl off the streets who claims to be a demigoddess? The mystery for the readers and the characters is who really is Khione. This is shown and not told in the novel. Thus, the readers and the characters slowly learn about who Khione really is.

The expected climax is that Khione becomes free. Here is a problem. Khione has no idea what it really means to be free. She hasn’t ever had friends. She has been mostly alone her entire life. When Pearce befriends her, this is a new stage in her life. Can you see the unexpected resolution? There is much more to this, but I think I made my point without giving away too much. I love these types of novels where the expected and the unexpected climax produce obvious irony and satire. Of course, the climax must include action. What do you think happens when the authorities discover Khione, an undocumented alien person with no paperwork at all?

My next as yet uncontracted Enchantment novel is Valeska: Enchantment and the Vampire.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment