Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 784, The Rising Action

27 August 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 784, The Rising Action

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I’m editing many of my novels using comments from my primary reader. I finished my 27th novel, working title Claire. I’m working on marketing materials.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

If you look above, you will see the five discrete parts of a novel. All good and successful novels have these five parts. Now, there are some Roman Fluv novels out there that ascribe to not have a climax—so be it, I say those are not novels. A novel without a climax is like a scene without a release. It exists, but does it make a sound when it falls in the forest. Really, such novels are usually not worth reading. Let’s assume as a writer of “good” novels, we accept that all novels must have the five discrete parts listed above.

In that case, following the initial scene, the author is in the rising action. By definition, everything from the initial scene to the climax is the rising action. This is the brass tacks of the novel—the fun part, the character revelation part, the building tension to the climax part. This is my favorite part. I enjoy the initial scene. I enjoy the climax. I love the rising action. This is the part where your characters live their lives and reveal the plot. The rising action should be filled with creative elements that entertain the reader. There should be nuggets on every page—the little pieces of excitement, entertainment, and foreshadowing that led the reader to the bitter or not so bitter end.

This is why and how I let the novel produce itself. I write each scene and see where that scene leaves my characters—that is the output of the scene. I start with that output as the input for the next scene and see where that scene goes etc. I know I’m moving toward the climax—that is my focus, but I’m letting the characters get there on their own. That is the entertaining part of writing to me. It is also the discovery part. Sometimes it leads to a very interesting climax, but the climax is always set by the character’s telic flaw—just so you remember. You might ask, what is Red Sonja’s telic flaw and what is the climax?

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 783, Input of the Second Scene

26 August 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 783, Input of the Second Scene

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I’m editing many of my novels using comments from my primary reader. I finished my 27th novel, working title Claire. I’m working on marketing materials.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

The output of the initial scene becomes the input for the next scene. The output was the promise to take Dorothy to dinner. She prepares for dinner and Mike picks her up. The end of this scene, the output, will likely be Mike’s promise to get her settled and started the next day. At some point I need to weave in the history from the times and place. The earliest date I have is 8 June when the X-15 engine blew up during a ground test. This will definitely be a buildup in the novel.

There is much more to the overall plot than you might imagine. The Soviets would not send a spy for a highly technical program who wasn’t trained and knowledgeable about aerodynamics, aircraft, and rockets. Red Sonja was educated in all these things. This will help provide her winter of discontent. The tension created by a person who was steeped in tyranny, who is suddenly in a truly free place will play heavily in the novel. This will help produce her issues and the overall tension in the novel.

Imagine a person from the very poor USSR who has been used to survival rations. When she has plenty to eat and all great food. When she sees everyone can eat this food. Imagine a person from the very restrictive USSR who sees freedom of expression and freedom of religion and freedom to have weapons. What about the scope of money and purchasing power. Red Sonja has been taught that the poor workers have nothing, but the rich wealthy have everything. How can she explain her own story, a Kansas farmer’s daughter who has a GS-4 job in an X plane program. Or how Mike, the son of a sharecropper can be a pilot in such a program. These conundrums have similar resolutions—their resolution in the plot will lead to her change (plus other problems).

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 782, Output of the Initial Scene

25 August 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 782, Output of the Initial Scene

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I’m editing many of my novels using comments from my primary reader. I finished my 27th novel, working title Claire. I’m working on marketing materials.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

So, then what is the output of the initial scene. Most specifically, I decided that having Dorothy get her own room in the woman’s dormitory would be a perfect place for the scene to end. In that scene, Mike promised to take Dorothy to dinner. This gives an opportunity for them to share more information together.

I think I’ve written more than once before that in my opinion, the best way to reveal characters is to place them in positions where they can communicate with each other. Dorothy can’t ever communicate with anyone. She is a spy. The point is to allow her and Mike, her target to speak together. Dinner is a perfect opportunity for this. It is also an opportunity for me to show the reader Edwards Air Force Base especially the parts that are different now. The officer’s club is one of those places.

Conversation allows characters to reveal themselves and their thoughts without telling. This is the great power of conversation. The output of the initial scene becomes the input for the next scene. I picture Mike taking Dorothy to the officer’s club and their dinner. The point of this is Dorothy’s reflection and her introduction to decent food. Additionally, the characters will be able to converse about their work and lives. Mike has every reason to talk. He’s a gregarious pilot. Dorothy has every reason to listen and try to keep quiet. She is a spy. She wants to know about everything, but especially about the X programs on base. She’ll get a lesson in much more.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 781, the Meeting in the Initial Scene

24 August 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 781, the Meeting in the Initial Scene

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I’m editing many of my novels using comments from my primary reader. I finished my 27th novel, working title Claire. I’m working on marketing materials.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

The initial scene in this novel is the meeting of the protagonist and the protagonist’s helper. The protagonist is Dorothy Smith, aka Red Sonja. The protagonist’s helper is Mike Rush, who goes by the tactical, Blaze. The setting is the opportunity to describe the place and the characters. Thus we get the rest of the description of Dorothy:

Dorothy glanced to the left and right again. She caught a glimpse of herself in the window directly above the bench. Her hair was a mess, even under her scarf. Brunette waves stuck out at the sides and the back. Her face looked pretty. She’d been told that over and over—she was pretty, even somewhat beautiful. She believed that to a point. Her face still held the smile she’d tried to plaster there. Her eyes were green and her nose small. She had an oval face set off by her hair. The wind tried to catch her dress again, but she held it down and then sat on the bench.

Already, she could feel the sweat trickling down her sides and between her breasts. They weren’t her best asset, but she’d been told they were sufficient for the work she needed to do. Sweat marked her dress under her arms. It was sleeveless. She’d taken up the habit of shaving there, but she was certain that needed a touchup. She should have insisted on spending a night in Lancaster where she could greet him in the morning, when she looked her best and would make the best impression. Dorothy gave another sigh—it was too late now.

This is more of the character setting. We see this woman Dorothy Smith who has come to Lancaster, California by train. The setting is Spring 1960. She is waiting for Lieutenant Mike Rush to pick her up. I’m still working on this scene, but most of the important parts are put together.

A man wearing a khaki shirt and pants ran around the corner of the train station. His shirt was open at the top and his white t-shirt showed there. Silver lieutenant bars were pinned to his collar, and silver pilot wings sat above his left shirt pocket. He wore a blue garrison cap with an officer’s silver braid. He was lean and looked tall to Dorothy. His hair looked a slight burnt red, lighter than brown, but darker than red. It was parted and longer across the front that at the sides and back. His face was taunt and thin, but he wore a relieved smile and it appeared more gentle than tough. He looked like a contrast to the kinds of men Dorothy was used to. Still she had been warned about this over and over. They might look pleasant, but they are still men and especially American military officers and pilots.

Looking at him, she didn’t have to fake her smile, until she noticed he appeared perfect, pristine. His clothing was unwrinkled and the creases on his pants and shirt were sharp. In spite of the heat, he wasn’t sweating. He looked irritated, but not uncomfortable. She hoped he wasn’t irritated at her.

The moment Dorothy spotted him, she stood. That seemed to spur him to even more speed. He came right up to her, and didn’t remove his flight cap. He touched the silver edge. His voice was a slow baritone with a slight southern inflection, “Good afternoon. Are you Miss Smith? Miss Dorothy Smith?”

Here is the meeting. Not super exciting. I hope the overall scene is entertaining. The most important thing to note is the setting and especially the character setting. This is a very important part of the initial scene. In terms of the initial scene, that’s about it. From this scene, we can write an entire novel. The output of this scene forms the input for the next scene. I’ll discuss the output next.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 780, the Meeting in the Initial Scene Setting

23 August 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 780, the Meeting in the Initial Scene Setting

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I’m editing many of my novels using comments from my primary reader. I finished my 27th novel, working title Claire. I’m working on marketing materials.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

We begin the initial scene with scene setting. Here’s the beginning:

Dorothy Smith stepped off the train onto the platform of the Lancaster Station, Lancaster, California. Already the air was hot and getting hotter by the moment. The smell of diesel, dust, and scalded rock burnt her nostrils. The wind tugged at her, and she barely caught her light blue dress before it lifted above her thighs. She made a face that quickly settled into an uneasy smile. Her dress looked wrinkled, and she couldn’t do anything to fix that here. She could only afford a third class ticket without a sleeper, and she felt grubby as well as uncomfortable. Dorothy held down her skirt and touched her hair. It felt stiff and unkept. She’d tried to tease it out in the train’s restroom, but the curl had fallen out, and she was sure it looked dreadful. She’d covered it with her light blue scarf. Her makeup looked in better shape. She hated wearing it, but she had become accustomed to it. She licked her too red lips and berated herself. She’d have to repair that as soon as she could. With an uncharacteristic sigh, she scurried out of the full sunshine and under the long awning in front of the station. Behind her, one of the conductors lugged her large cardboard valise. He carried it with both hands. It was so easy to get these men to do things like this for her. She was told that was the case, but she had to see it to believe it. With a small smile, a look of helplessness, and a tiny gesture, they would come to her help and attend to almost any need. If she’d want to, she wouldn’t have had to pay for a single meal during her travels, and she could have shared a sleeper. She didn’t allow herself that pleasure. She didn’t need the attention or the entanglements. She just noted the availability.

I may change this beginning, but it’s not too bad. The time is not directly stated. I put that in the beginning like this:

Spring 1960, Lancaster Train Station, Lancaster, California, USA

I will also relate the time directly in the initial scene. You can see the protagonist is partially described. There is more in the next paragraph. The point is that the initial scene requires a strong setting—that includes character description. Notice, I don’t give you any information about who Dorothy Smith really is. This is for revelation in the novel. I do give some little slips of information that might make the reader pause and wonder. This is my style, and a style I intend to use through the entire novel. The tension and release cycle starts with this paragraph and is made clear in the next paragraph. Dorothy is worried about her appearance. The reader can guess why. The next paragraph makes this very clear:

She looked to the right and the left. No one matched the description of her greeter so she stopped beside a wooden bench. The conductor placed her bag at the side of the bench.

Dorothy is waiting for someone. The someone is the protagonist’s helper. This is the meeting of the two.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 779, more the Initial Scene Setting

22 August 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 779, more the Initial Scene Setting

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I’m editing many of my novels using comments from my primary reader. I finished my 27th novel, working title Claire. I’m working on marketing materials.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

In a perfect world, an author might have every piece of relevant documentation (primary and secondary) available to him and then have a person from the place and time review the writing. That’s in a perfect world. One of my writer friends wrote about the War of 1812. He had multiple experts on the period review the work. Most of us don’t have the connections or the ability to get this kind of help. You have a couple of means to make your historical writing as good as possible.

The first is focus on primary and secondary accounts. This means you want eyewitness and interviews of eyewitness accounts. You also want pictures, recordings, videos, first person writing, and reports from the time and place. Use details from these sources to punctuate the historicity. Additionally, go see or look at pictures for accuracy of the things and places you are writing about. For example, this new novel is about Edwards and flight test. First, I found direct information about the place in some autobiographical books. They had great pictures in them. Second, I looked at historical records and timelines for the year. Third, I am going to include information on flying and aircraft. I have pictures of the aircraft and their cockpits. There is more to this. The point is to gather details that people from the period can’t miss and will not miss.

The other trick is where you can’t find details or there are no details, use the current world, dial it back in time, and then obfuscate it. This can work for a military formation, a church service, a promotion ceremony, a military award ceremony, an emergency response, or any other detailed event where data will not exist, but the author needs details. In other words, take the best you have from the modern world and back it into the past. I assure you, you will get it very close. You can also use this method for future events as well as the past. For example, in my science fiction in the far future, I still have pilots giving flight briefings. They give them almost the same way they do today. How else would they?

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 778, The Initial Scene Setting

21 August 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 778, The Initial Scene Setting

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I’m editing many of my novels using comments from my primary reader. I finished my 27th novel, working title Claire. I’m working on marketing materials.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

In the theme statement, we have a setting: Edwards AFB. This is a great setting because I’ve lived there twice, and lived in the area four times. Plus, I’ve spent a lot of time in the area and accomplishing the mission the novel will cover. I was an experimental test pilot for the USAF, and I still work as an experimental test pilot in industry. I know many of the people who flew these aircraft. I wish I had more details, but I’ll work that out. The setting from this standpoint is perfect—the problem is turning back the clock. I worked and lived at Edwards in the 1990s—I want to set the story in the 1960s. That is another part of the setting.

To get the setting right, I need to research, which I’m doing and to get every detail as perfect as possible. I’m doing this too. Another problem is the detail and the lack of detail for the period. The detail is fantastic, but much of it isn’t recorded and isn’t on the web. The lack of detail is breathtaking—for the closeness of the times to now, there is still a great lack of information about the mundane. In writing about cultures and history much displaced in time, the writer must interpolate and extrapolate much of the information. The wise writer has a basis in fact for everything, but because of the lack of information on some subjects, the author must use logic, science, or other sources to tease out the information.

In a modernish novel, the author must get even the smallest detail correct. The reason is there are too many living people who will spot errors large and small. The small errors can be handled easily, the large errors can’t be explained. The best source are the people who were there, when they are available. I may ask a few to review the novel for accuracy. That’s also a problem. Many very intelligent people have a focused intelligence. They are wonderful in their field and sometimes wonderful out of it. Then there are many who don’t have a single clue outside their area of expertise. The problem of closeness of witness is also a problem in the modern era. That is many times eyewitnesses have problems remembering fact from false and time doesn’t help.

Closeness is the author’s friend in this kind of historical setting. That is, close is good enough. Very small details that are obvious can be beautiful touches, but details that can’t be corroborated with photos, records, are all suspect.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment