Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 996, Tension and Release with Creative Elements in the Rising Action

28 March 2017, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 996, Tension and Release with Creative Elements in the Rising Action

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

I finished writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Curse. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, a dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Sorcha: Enchantment and the Curse.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja. I’m also working on my 29th novel, working title School.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 28: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 29: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

 

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Would you like to write a novel that a publisher will consider? Would you like to write a novel that is published? How about one that sells?

How do you write a strong and entertaining rising action? The reader becomes excited about your novel from the initial scene. They love your novel because of the build up to the climax in the rising action. The initial scene is the most important scene, but every scene in the rising action has its own importance to produce tension and release to build to the climax. I think you can have a really great novel as long as the initial scene is excellent and the rising action is entertaining. It all has to be entertaining, but the scenes in the rising action drive the novel beyond the initial scene. The question is how do we write them and make them entertaining?

Number one thought, every scene needs to be focused around an entertaining creative element. This creative element must drive the scene both internally and toward the climax. Thus, there ae all kinds of creative elements in my initial scene for School, the novel I’m working on right now. The main creative element is of the initial scene is a fight. The girl Deirdre is following figures the only way to get rid of Deirdre is to hit her, perhaps beat her up. She doesn’t know that Deirdre was sent to Wycombe Abbey for fighting. The main creative element of the scene is the fight. This is the main tension and release developer in the scene. This is also the creative element that sets off the entire novel. The entire scene is built around this creative element. The creative element fosters and develops the tension throughout the scene. The reader doesn’t know that this is the focus of the release for the scene, but all kinds of other elements and information points to this as the release in the scene. For example, we find that Deirdre constantly talks about the briefing about her. The teachers who were briefed about her issues will back down if she acts a certain way and etc. In other words, this is foreshadowing using events and information to let the reader know that something might happen if Deirdre is crossed. There are hints and information passed to the reader. The reader might or might not guess that Deirdre and the girl will fight, but the resolution isn’t unexpected. When the girl attacks, they get that Deirdre won’t back down, not easily. The reader knows there will be a fight, they just don’t know the outcome or the details. The point is there is a huge build up in this scene to the fight. The fight is the creative element and the driving creative element for the scene. The next scene is also driven by another creative element.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 995, About Pathos into the Rising Action

27 March 2017, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 995, About Pathos in the Rising Action

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

I finished writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Curse. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, a dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Sorcha: Enchantment and the Curse.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja. I’m also working on my 29th novel, working title School.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 28: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 29: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

 

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Would you like to write a novel that a publisher will consider? Would you like to write a novel that is published? How about one that sells?

I’m not sure pathos is used enough in modern literature. The Victorians were geniuses at pathos. Readers are suckers for pathos. Why don’t authors use pathos more strongly? Why don’t authors use Romantic characters more often? The primary reason is that most people are not being taught much about classical literature. In fact, although I was taught in high school about classical novel development, I didn’t get much in college. From conversations here and there, I have the feeling that many if not most college and high school students aren’t taught much at all about novel development and form. In general, I think young people aren’t taught about novels and literature. They are taught to interpret literature, but I think they know nothing about the tools to understand and write literature. I was not taught well about this subject. I did get many of the fundamentals.

Personally, I don’t think many people, professors, and teachers are qualified to teach this subject. I’m not certain they are able to teach about novels and literature either. I have a very distinct feeling that modern teaching about literature comes down to: what do you feel this means or what do you think about this? Literature doesn’t matter what you or your teacher think about it—literature just is. You can argue the strength or the origin of a figure of speech, but the meaning of that figure of speech in context should be obvious. If it isn’t obvious in context, the novelist failed grossly. There is no homoerotic, hetero, black, socialist, Marxist, Christian, modern, female, male, etc. interpretation of literature. Now, I do know you can go to universities and pay $40,000 per year to hear nonsense about these fictitious interpretations of literature. Don’t pay for it and don’t believe it. If you do, you will never become a novelist.

Just remember the primary rules of writing fiction. The purpose of fiction is to entertain. This is the beginning and the end of everything in fiction. If you forget this or never learn it in the first place, you might become a professor of literature, but you will never write a novel that sells.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 994, more Introducing Pathos into the Rising Action

26 March 2017, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 994, more Introducing Pathos into the Rising Action

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja. I’m also working on my 29th novel, working title School.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 28: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 29: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

 

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Would you like to write a novel that a publisher will consider? Would you like to write a novel that is published? How about one that sells?

As an author, don’t lose the advantage of building and developing pathos in revelation. If your characters can be made to build pathos through revelation, so much the better. Milk it for everything it’s worth.

Most of the time we are working with Romantic or with at least larger than life characters. Many of these characters are not pathos building to begin with. A little misfortune here, a little pain and suffering there, and you have a pathetic character. Remember, pathetic and pathos means they create powerful and correct emotion. The perfect example of a pathos building Romantic (or larger than life) character is the hero veteran from Southeast Asia. These people are tough, true specimens of powerful, strong, well-trained soldiers. When they are injured or maimed, they become immediately pathos building. There is absolutely nothing subtle about a brave man or woman who has lost a limb or worst in the fight for freedom. This is one of the most powerful pathos building revelations or events you can create in literature. I’m surprised it hasn’t been used more often. You see it in some very few novels. In general, the twentieth century was embarrassed about its war wounded. Not so much today—people are not embarrassed, they are ready to accept and feel for them.

This is just one example, but a very powerful one. The typical revelation and developed pathos are more simple: the suddenly hungry, the guy who lost his job, the guy who lost his family or wife. You can go on and on. As I noted, Flavia DeLuca is a potentially very powerful pathos character, but the author completely or nearly completely misses this characteristic in her. You see places where it rears its head out of the weeds, but then it’s gone again. What I could do with such a character—I’d draw out every nubbin of pathos. She wouldn’t act much different, but the picture would be much different. This may be part of the problem with the later novels—you can love a kid who is tough, but suffering. It is very hard to love a kid who is tough without much real reason for it. Just say’n.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 993, Introducing Pathos into the Rising Action

25 March 2017, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 993, Introducing Pathos into the Rising Action

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja. I’m also working on my 29th novel, working title School.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 28: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 29: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

 

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Would you like to write a novel that a publisher will consider? Would you like to write a novel that is published? How about one that sells?

I like to start with characters who immediately introduce pathos into the writing, but many Romantic characters can’t be made pathetic and some characters who initially seem strong and independent can be made or revealed as pathetic. Remember, pathetic means pathos developing, which means the character creates a strong and appropriate emotion in the reader.

Let’s review Sorcha and Deirdre a little. Sorcha is my major pathos building character in this new novel. She literally has nothing but a good mind and a fit and athletic body. She was in the British foster and homes system until she beat up some girls. She was sent to juvie prison and escaped. She decided she wanted to attend Wycombe Abbey and is now attending in plain sight. She is not paying tuition, and she is not officially on the student list. She has skills and is very tricky. She learned to get into the classes. Sorcha immediately builds pathos because we want to cheer for her efforts—even if they are slightly illegal and wrong. At the same time, we want her to succeed. Do you taste the Romantic nature of her character too.

Deirdre is an altogether different character. She has had everything she needs—not perhaps everything she wants, but we know she has anger and fighting issues—that’s why she was sent to Wycombe Abbey, and that’s why Luna is watching her so closely. We realize that Deirdre has never really been put upon, or we think we know this—the revelation will be different. In any case, Deirdre also builds pathos, but a different kind of pathos. We see her latching onto Sorcha as a kind of sad need for friendship that she can’t really achieve any other way.

For the new character (no name yet), she is a girl who is a day border. Day borders are supposed to be included in the school Houses and structure, but sometimes they aren’t despite the work of the teachers. This girl is poor, on scholarship, weird, a great student, but very stuck up, and not in the good graces of those girls in the power structure. You can see immediately the pathos elements—these won’t be immediately evident. They must be revealed in the plot. Likewise, the force of the pathos elements of Sorcha and Deirdre will be further revealed. This is similar to Flavia DeLuca. She is a great pathos revealing Romantic character. Her father is a nobleman, but her mother is dead. She has a cook, but eats terrible food. She lives in a huge mansion that is falling apart. She never thinks of herself as poor, but she never has money in her pocket. I think the author should have made her even more pathos building, but he didn’t. As an author, don’t lose the advantage of building and developing pathos in revelation. There is much more about this.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 992, Ideas in Tension, Developing the Rising Action, Themes and Pathos

24 March 2017, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 992, Ideas in Tension, Developing the Rising Action, Themes and Pathos

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja. I’m also working on my 29th novel, working title School.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 28: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 29: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

 

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Would you like to write a novel that a publisher will consider? Would you like to write a novel that is published? How about one that sells?

Time to introduce a new character into my novel, School. I had a brilliant idea for a new character to add to the novel I’m currently writing. The theme statement for the novel is writen above under novel 29. I’m currently writing the rising action. I’m introducing the plot line (storyline) at the moment in the novel. What that means is I’m providing the setup for the climax. In this case the setup is training by Luna of Sorcha and Deirdre. Sorcha is our little hiding soul, and Deirdre is our misunderstood/too well understood problem child. I had a great idea for a character that touches concepts outside these three—including Luna.

Where Sorcha is a striver who will never give up, and Deirdre is a fighter who never saw a problem she couldn’t bash her way through, I want to add in a pathos character who uses her intellect and apparent social position to move ahead. Where Sorcha is simply hiding in plain view, this girl is putting on airs to hide in plain view. The pathos of this entire situation is that she is an absolute fraud. Her secret is that she has nothing at all yet she uses her skills to gain position with others. I’m still trying to decide how to integrate her in the novel and with Sorcha and Deirdre. My initial thought about this character was the idea of three girls going on a bike ride. Sorcha and Deirdre have time trial bikes—that’s tri road bikes. Sorcha says, let’s go for distance. Deirdre says, let’s go for speed. This new character has an old Raleigh with a basket, high handlebars, and a bell. She says, let’s go for fun. Then she beats the other two. The point is that this girl is as competitive and strong as Deirdre and Sorcha, but she hides her strength under a persona of sweetness and dignity.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 991, Power of Secrets in Tension, Developing the Rising Action, Themes and Pathos

23 March 2017, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 991, Power of Secrets in Tension, Developing the Rising Action, Themes and Pathos

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja. I’m also working on my 29th novel, working title School.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 28: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 29: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

 

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Would you like to write a novel that a publisher will consider? Would you like to write a novel that is published? How about one that sells?

You can read the entire novel Aksinya Enchantment and the Daemon. I gave it to you in installments with comments on the writing. I don’t feel bad writing about spoilers. Aksinya is a novel filled with and all about secrets. It really isn’t a mystery, but it has some qualities of a mystery. It is a very complex novel, but very succinctly, it is about an aristocrat girl who calls a demon to protect her family from the Bolsheviks. The Bolsheviks murder her family anyway and now she is stuck with a demon who wants her to sin.

One of the great mysteries and secrets of the novel is the reality of the demon. No one else really sees him. He looks like a normal person to everyone other than Aksinya. Is the demon real or is he a figment of Aksinya’s imagination? Further, in the novel, we find everyone has a secret. Natalya has been abused. We learn that early. We didn’t know she was sexually used and tried to escape her abusive household through sex. Aksinya’s uncle and aunt have secrets. They want to be powerful in the nobility. Aksinya’s teacher has secrets—she is attracted to girls…and to Aksinya. The church has secrets. The Bishop has secrets. In Aksinya, there are secrets everywhere. All of these secrets are resolved or revealed in the novel. The big secret of the demon is the climax of the novel—it is also the telic flaw of Aksinya.

Novels should be filled with secrets—the more the better. I recommend you build novels on secrets. All mystery novels are. All detective novels are. Most spy novels are. Novels are all about secrets—you might as well think very carefully about this as you write.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 990, more Secrets in Tension, Developing the Rising Action, Themes and Pathos

22 March 2017, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 990, more Secrets in Tension, Developing the Rising Action, Themes and Pathos

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja. I’m also working on my 29th novel, working title School.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 28: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 29: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

 

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Would you like to write a novel that a publisher will consider? Would you like to write a novel that is published? How about one that sells?

To me, the idea of secrets and revelation of secrets flows in my writing. In many of my novels, I like to build a single or a set of secrets that are then revealed either at the climax or at some critical point in the novel. Here’s a big secret—the novel doesn’t have to be about the revelation of the secret. There can be secrets that just track through a novel. For example, in my Ghost Ship Chronicles, the great secret about Den is that his soul has changed. He has the soul of a long dead being trapped in his body, and his original soul is gone. Likewise, Natana in the novels has a great secret. She accidentally gained an ancient symbiotic computer chip that is attached to her brain. She can interact with this chip. These are secrets, but they are not the focus of the novels. The climaxes of the novels revolve around ideas related to the secrets, but the secrets themselves are not the main point of the novels.

Likewise, my enchantment novels are filled with secrets, but the secrets themselves are not the focus of the plot or the telic flaw. On the other hand, some of my novels are all about the secret. Most of these are mysteries. In my novel, Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon, Aksinya is a sorceress who called a demon. The fact she is a sorceress and that she called a deamon are great secrets. They are also related directly to the telic flaw and the plot of the novel. Aksinya wants to get rid of her demon. She must stop being a sorceress to do so. Ultimately, she is tried for being a sorceress in an ecclesiastical trial, and she is tried in a civil trial for the actions of the demon. These secrets cause the climax of the novel. Their revelation undoes Aksinya—the one because they believe she called a demon. The other because they don’t believe she called a demon. This is a wonderful and powerful paradox. This also relates to the power of secrets and the expected and unexpected climax in a novel. Aksinya is the perfect example of this.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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