Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 364, Phone Information, the Rising Action

3 July 2015, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 364, Phone Information, the Rising Action

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 25th novel, working title, Escape, is this: a girl in a fascist island nation will do anything to escape–a young cargo shuttle pilot not following the rules crashes on the island.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I’m writing about the transition from the initial scene to the rising action of my newest novel, “Escape.”  Escape is the working title.  I’ll decide on the actual proposed title when I finish the novel.  I’m at the nineteenth chapter right now.  That means I’ve written about 380 pages.  I’ve just started on the next major run-through.

Let’s review my guidelines for conversation.
1.  Cultural norms (greeting, introduction, small talk, big talk)

2.  Logical response (characters must respond to each other in the conversation)

3.  ID the speaker

4.  Show us the picture of the conversation

5.  Use contractions (most of the time)

6.  What are you trying to say?

7.  What is unsaid in the conversation?

8.  Build the tone of the conversation.

9.  Show don’t tell.

10.  Keep proper names to a minimum.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.  I’ll describe this technique (and style) again if you are new to my blog or you missed it before.

Short digression:  I’m writing from Dubai on another around the world tour.  Recovering from the time change.

I’ve listed many ways of sharing and exploring information.  One of the most important in the past and one that is misused a lot is the phone and radio.  Everyone is an expert on phones–or in the first world, they should be.  If you aren’t an expert on phone communications–that is, if you haven’t used them most of your life, you shouldn’t even attempt to use them for information sharing in your novels–not without extensive study.

I’ve read pieces by expert writers who have messed up phone communications.  The main reason–they don’t follow the main guidelines (rules) of conversation–especially the first few. In writing a phone conversation, you must identify the participants in a much stronger way than you do in regular conversation.  The reason is that your tags and identifications from at least one side are all via sound only.  You can show tags and easily ID the Point of View (POV) caller–you can’t do the same for the other side.  You can see this might be a similar problem for texting and other types of two way communication.  The author must be very clear and very direct about the identification of the speakers.  Here is an example from my unpublished novel, Khione:

In the morning, when Pearce went to visit Khione there was an altercation at the hospital. They wouldn’t let Pearce see her, and her room was blocked by police officers and tape. Pearce called his father from the atrium, “Dad, what’s going on with Khione. They wouldn’t let me see her.”

Dr. Wimund’s voice was weary, “She’s gone Pearce.”

“Gone?”

“She slipped out of the window last night and the police are searching for her.”

“Is she alright?”

“No idea. I just found out myself. The nurse said she was active and mobile and seemed to be recovering well. When they checked on her during the night, she was gone.”

“I’m going to look for her.”

Dr. Wimund’s voice was bland, “And how are you going to find her? From what you told me, she’s adept at hiding in the city.”

“Adept when she is well.”

“Perhaps that is part of it. She felt well enough to escape. She might show up on your doorstep. She doesn’t have anywhere else to go.”

Pearce asked, “Did she take her things?”

“No idea, the police have her room on a lockdown.”

“She isn’t an escaped convict.”

“Son, ICE is involved and maybe others. I don’t know what else might be happening.”

“Won’t they keep you informed?”

“Hard to tell. They think she is dangerous, but I don’t think they will shoot her or anything.”

“I’m going to look for her.”

“My prayers will be with you.”

“Thanks, dad,” Pearce hung up.

This phone conversation might need more tags especially from Pearce’s side.  Notice, the initial identification of who is speaking and the very specific sound tags.  There are limited ID tags to hold to the feel of a phone conversation.  The point is this–ID your speakers.  Remember tags can be sound based or voice based.  Make it sound like a phone conversation.  Ensure the reader understands the topic.  I think you can piece a great deal from this short conversation, and you haven’t read the rest of the novel.  Radio communications are even more important to get right.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 363, General Information, the Rising Action

2 July 2015, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 363, General Information, the Rising Action

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 25th novel, working title, Escape, is this: a girl in a fascist island nation will do anything to escape–a young cargo shuttle pilot not following the rules crashes on the island.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I’m writing about the transition from the initial scene to the rising action of my newest novel, “Escape.”  Escape is the working title.  I’ll decide on the actual proposed title when I finish the novel.  I’m at the nineteenth chapter right now.  That means I’ve written about 380 pages.  I’ve just started on the next major run-through..

Let’s review my guidelines for conversation.

1.  Cultural norms (greeting, introduction, small talk, big talk)
2.  Logical response (characters must respond to each other in the conversation)
3.  ID the speaker
4.  Show us the picture of the conversation
5.  Use contractions (most of the time)
6.  What are you trying to say?
7.  What is unsaid in the conversation?
8.  Build the tone of the conversation.
9.  Show don’t tell.
10.  Keep proper names to a minimum.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.  I’ll describe this technique (and style) again if you are new to my blog or you missed it before.

Short digression:  I’m writing from Dubai on another around the world tour.  I just flew 22 hours, so I hope this is cogent.

In using the rising action to build to the climax, the author reveals the plot and the characters to arrive at the climax of the novel.  To accomplish this is rather straightforward–as long as you are using some means to organize the novel, your thoughts, and the plot.  This is why I advocate using the scene input/output method.  With this method, you won’t confuse yourself or your readers.  There are reasons to jump or cut away from scene input/output, but I’ll discuss those later.

At this point I’m explaining methods you can use to reveal information about your characters.  Since Escape is a cultural revelation novel, it is a great example of means to reveal information, cultures, and characters.  I already mentioned: description, conversation, interaction, and computers.  You can add to that list: books, notes, letters, phone calls, signs, radio calls, etc.

I do use books and signs in Escape.  The books are electronic and paperback.  The signs are the slogans and posters of the Supreme Leader.  Electronic books play a very important role in passing information, not about Freedom (the evil nation), but about Scott’s nation that is truly free to Reb.  The electronic books also provide chart (map) data and satellite imagery for the exploration of Freedom.  Unlike my other novels, I didn’t use notes (except email and texting), letters (except email), and phone calls.  I did use radio signaling and cellular phone for information gathering.  You might imagine that phone, radio, and cellular phones are all the same thing.  They may be similar, but their use and communication varies significantly.  Perhaps we should discuss their use in some detail.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 362, Computer Information, the Rising Action

1 July 2015, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 362, Computer Information, the Rising Action

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 25th novel, working title, Escape, is this: a girl in a fascist island nation will do anything to escape–a young cargo shuttle pilot not following the rules crashes on the island.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I’m writing about the transition from the initial scene to the rising action of my newest novel, “Escape.”  Escape is the working title.  I’ll decide on the actual proposed title when I finish the novel.  I’m at the nineteenth chapter right now.  That means I’ve written about 380 pages.  I’ve just finished writing the dénouement.

Let’s review my guidelines for conversation.

1.  Cultural norms (greeting, introduction, small talk, big talk)
2.  Logical response (characters must respond to each other in the conversation)
3.  ID the speaker
4.  Show us the picture of the conversation
5.  Use contractions (most of the time)
6.  What are you trying to say?
7.  What is unsaid in the conversation?
8.  Build the tone of the conversation.
9.  Show don’t tell.
10.  Keep proper names to a minimum.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.  I’ll describe this technique (and style) again if you are new to my blog or you missed it before.

I’ve used computers before in novels for characters to research information.  I’ve also used computers for characters to communicate–mostly emails.  In the extrapolated world of Freedom, the Party Members do not communicate often face to face.  In their world, they have reduced human interaction between peers as much as possible.  Most of their interaction is between slaves and servants (not that there is any real difference in Freedom).

In Freedom, the computer has replaced peer to peer interaction and involvement.  This allows the Party Members to commit heinous crimes with no thought to facing their potential accusers.  The computer, in the novel becomes a metaphor and an actual thing that allows humans to communicate without regard for any humanity.  That’s not to say I see computers in a totally negative manner–Freedom is an extrapolation of communism.  The use of computers to control and manipulate people is simply an extrapolation as well.

You can imagine that computers used in this fashion can allow Scott to infiltrate and manipulate the system himself–if all you need is a digital signature, then anything becomes possible in Freedom.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 361, Others Information Transition to the Rising Action

30 June 2015, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 361, Others Information Transition to the Rising Action

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 25th novel, working title, Escape, is this: a girl in a fascist island nation will do anything to escape–a young cargo shuttle pilot not following the rules crashes on the island.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I’m writing about the transition from the initial scene to the rising action of my newest novel, “Escape.”  Escape is the working title.  I’ll decide on the actual proposed title when I finish the novel.  I’m at the nineteenth chapter right now.  That means I’ve written about 380 pages.  I’ve just finished writing the dénouement.

Let’s review my guidelines for conversation.

1.  Cultural norms (greeting, introduction, small talk, big talk)
2.  Logical response (characters must respond to each other in the conversation)
3.  ID the speaker
4.  Show us the picture of the conversation
5.  Use contractions (most of the time)
6.  What are you trying to say?
7.  What is unsaid in the conversation?
8.  Build the tone of the conversation.
9.  Show don’t tell.
10.  Keep proper names to a minimum.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.  I’ll describe this technique (and style) again if you are new to my blog or you missed it before.

In the novel, Scott wants as much information as possible about Freedom.  His purpose is to escape Freedom.  The reader wants to know just as much, if not more, than Scott–that’s entertainment.

The rising action is he main part of the novel.  It must move us from the initial scene by way of scenes to the climax scene.  The plot of the novel is mainly bound in the rising action.  Each scene must be tied to the other from the initial scene to the climax scene.  I usually tie the scenes through input/output, although I do use some other methods.  I advocate input/output for new writers–plus, most of the novel should be input/output.  If not, the novel can be confusing to write and to read.

In an information based novel (a revelation plot) like Escape, the characters must meet others and communicate with them.  The interaction of the characters is a critical and necessary part of the novel.  Interaction usually means conversation, although, action is also common.  In a novel like Escape the conversational interaction is naturally limited.  The reason is one of the man characters is hunted.  In fact, both main characters end up hunted in the novel.  It is difficult for the hunted to have an opportunity for conversation with anyone other than themselves.  Therefore, the author must create circumstances.

I mentioned Steve from the hospital.  Steve provides Scott information that is timely and necessary–especially about the foods and the drugs.  Another source of information is the Freedom computer system.  Scott gets much of his information about Freedom in this way.  The computer system is one of the main means in the novel for Scott to learn information about Freedom.  Because he is able to access the private Party System, he is able to get all the information he needs to make an escape plan.  I will not divulge how he gets into the private Party system.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 360, Friends Information Transition to the Rising Action

29 June 2015, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 360, Friends Information Transition to the Rising Action

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 25th novel, working title, Escape, is this: a girl in a fascist island nation will do anything to escape–a young cargo shuttle pilot not following the rules crashes on the island.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I’m writing about the transition from the initial scene to the rising action of my newest novel, “Escape.”  Escape is the working title.  I’ll decide on the actual proposed title when I finish the novel.  I’m at the nineteenth chapter right now.  That means I’ve written about 380 pages.  I’ve just finished writing the dénouement.
Let’s review my guidelines for conversation.

1.  Cultural norms (greeting, introduction, small talk, big talk)

2.  Logical response (characters must respond to each other in the conversation)

3.  ID the speaker

4.  Show us the picture of the conversation

5.  Use contractions (most of the time)

6.  What are you trying to say?

7.  What is unsaid in the conversation?

8.  Build the tone of the conversation.

9.  Show don’t tell.

10.  Keep proper names to a minimum.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.  I’ll describe this technique (and style) again if you are new to my blog or you missed it before.

In the novel, Scott wants as much information as possible about Freedom.  His purpose is to escape Freedom.  The reader wants to know just as much, if not more, than Scott–that’s entertainment.  In developing scenes that lead toward the climax, I use the output of the last scene to propel the input of the next scene.  Each scene follows the other in a logical and time sequence.  The climax of the novel Escape is to escape.  The characters must gain enough information to escape the nation of Freedom–plus, as an author, I can give them a push when I need to.

I mentioned knowledge from another source.  Specifically, I wrote that the initial information the protagonist and the reader gain in the rising action is through observation.  This is descriptive narration.  This process or narration and description continues through the novel.  I am not talking about the narrator telling the reader information the protagonist doesn’t see or know–I am writing about the description of the land of Freedom that the protagonist and protagonist’s helper sees.  It is a description of the place seen through the eyes of the main characters.  Don’t use omniscient voice or anything the protagonist or protagonist’s helper can’t see to progress the knowledge of the reader.  What the protagonist knows the reader should know and no more.  There is a caveat to this in terms of the use of scenes to provide information the protagonist might not know, but that the author wishes to show the reader.  I’ll get to this later.  Here is an example fro the rising action of description that moves into character interaction and conversation.

Scott put his phone back in his pocket and headed down the coast. He headed in the direction Reb had brought him into the community last night. He passed the dorms and headed down a road that paralleled the coast. He hadn’t gone very far before he spotted a tall rectangular building. This building was large with lower extensions to the left and right. Like the other buildings, it had no windows. No one was on the road at all—compared to everywhere else around here that was unusual. He wondered if he should hide—or at least approach the place with a little more caution. When he came closer, he spotted a large sign above the main door: reuse, recycle, reduce. He didn’t see anyone around, so he was completely surprised when the door opened and a Citizen stepped out and walked toward him. The man wore the regular clothing of a citizen, but he had an instrument around his neck and a belt filled with medical tools around his waist. His face was symmetrical and fine. His features were more regular than Rebs. His face possessed a naturally positive and gentle appearance as though whatever skills he had, compassion was supposed to be one of them. The man didn’t come too close to Scott, and he didn’t really look directly at him, “Good day, Citizen. I didn’t expect any patients at the moment, and I asked for help with some work here. Am I wrong to presume you have been assigned here?”

Scott didn’t delay his response, “Perhaps I have the skills you require.”

The man smiled, “I’m HD08 950 Steve. I know that names are not very important, but if you are assigned here it will help me to address you properly.”

Scott had to glance at his wrist, “I’m CN 20537 Scott.”

The man, Steve smiled, “Construction—that is exactly what I needed here, and you are in my series. Those are both very good.” He almost seemed conspiratable when he stated, “The last time they sent a cleaning specialist and before that a vegetation clearer. I have been very clear in my requests—don’t take any of that as a complaint. I’m certain, the Party is trying their hardest to meet the needs of our Citizens…it’s just so difficult…” he finished lamely, “when they don’t send the right specialties.” Steve motioned to Scott, “Come, I’ll show you what needs to be done.”

Steve mistakes Scott for the assigned construction worker.  The reason is because no one wants to work at the hospital if they can help it.  The hospital is a terrible place.  One of my main goals in the writing is to show the reader how horrible a place the hospital is in Freedom.  Scott’s work at the hospital and his friendship with Steve allows me to explore this.  Steve provides great information to Scott that only an HD (Hospital Doctor) could provide.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 359, more Information Transition to the Rising Action

28 June 2015, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 359, more Information Transition to the Rising Action

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 25th novel, working title, Escape, is this: a girl in a fascist island nation will do anything to escape–a young cargo shuttle pilot not following the rules crashes on the island.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I’m writing about the transition from the initial scene to the rising action of my newest novel, “Escape.”  Escape is the working title.  I’ll decide on the actual proposed title when I finish the novel.  I’m at the nineteenth chapter right now.  That means I’ve written about 380 pages.  I’ve just finished writing the dénouement.

Let’s review my guidelines for conversation.

1.  Cultural norms (greeting, introduction, small talk, big talk)
2.  Logical response (characters must respond to each other in the conversation)
3.  ID the speaker
4.  Show us the picture of the conversation
5.  Use contractions (most of the time)
6.  What are you trying to say?
7.  What is unsaid in the conversation?
8.  Build the tone of the conversation.
9.  Show don’t tell.
10.  Keep proper names to a minimum.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.  I’ll describe this technique (and style) again if you are new to my blog or you missed it before.

In the novel, Scott wants as much information as possible about Freedom.  His purpose is to escape Freedom.  The reader wants to know just as much, if not more, than Scott–that’s entertainment.

Part of the problem in transitioning to the rising action is that Reb doesn’t know everything.  If the purpose of the novel is to reveal the protagonist, the protagonist’s helper, the plot, and the culture of the society, the author can’t completely rely on any single source.  This is why I really don’t like first person novels.  A first person novel only gives you one point of view.  When I read a novel, I want to know everything about the place and the characters.  If the place and the characters weren’t worth knowing about, they wouldn’t be worth writing or reading about.

In transitioning or working scenes in this novel, the key players are Scott, Reb, knowledgeable Citizens, Party Members, and observation.  I gave you a little of Scott’s observation.  If you note, in a novel like this, there is not a lot of opportunity to make friends and get information–the author must provide this interface and interaction.  I accomplish this through having Scott work for the hospital.  At the hospital, Scott meets HD08 950 Steve.  Steve mistakes Scott for the new workman assigned to the hospital.  Steve is an HD (Hospital Doctor) which means he executes Citizens by extracting their organs and fluids.  Steve isn’t evil–it’s just his job–yuck.

Steve feels an affinity for Scott because their series is the same (S) and Scott is more observant and talkative than the usual CN (Construction) Citizen.  Steve tells Scott all about the drugs used in Freedom and more about the hospital than Scott would really like to know.  By engaging in conversation as friends, Scott (and the reader) can learn things about Freedom that Reb doesn’t know and that isn’t common knowledge.

Simply, in any novel, the rising action is about meeting people, potentially making friends, and learning information from them.  Part of the focus of the rising action is about this interaction–the trick is to move the scenes in this direction.  I’ll give an example tomorrow.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 358, Information Transition to the Rising Action

27 June 2015, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 358, Information Transition to the Rising Action

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 25th novel, working title, Escape, is this: a girl in a fascist island nation will do anything to escape–a young cargo shuttle pilot not following the rules crashes on the island.

Here is the cover proposal for Lilly: Enchantment and the ComputerLilly is my 24th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I’m writing about the transition from the initial scene to the rising action of my newest novel, “Escape.”  Escape is the working title.  I’ll decide on the actual proposed title when I finish the novel.  I’m at the nineteenth chapter right now.  That means I’ve written about 380 pages.  I’ve just finished writing the climax.

Let’s review my guidelines for conversation.

1.  Cultural norms (greeting, introduction, small talk, big talk)

2.  Logical response (characters must respond to each other in the conversation)

3.  ID the speaker

4.  Show us the picture of the conversation

5.  Use contractions (most of the time)

6.  What are you trying to say?

7.  What is unsaid in the conversation?

8.  Build the tone of the conversation.

9.  Show don’t tell.

10.  Keep proper names to a minimum.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.  I’ll describe this technique (and style) again if you are new to my blog or you missed it before.

In the novel, Scott wants as much information as possible about Freedom.  His purpose is to escape Freedom.  The reader wants to know just as much, if not more, than Scott–that’s entertainment.  I love these kinds of novels–both to read and to write.  In the writing, I am creating a new world where all the parts connect through logic and human norms.  The world that is created my not look exactly like any place within the actual human domains, but it must fit together logically and reasonably.  The enjoyable part is the revelation of this world to the reader–in every sense. Therefore, we need to find ways to inform Scott and the readers about this world.

The first and most powerful is showing–actually living in the world.  I cut off much of the description from the second scene of Escape.  I think I’ll give you a little of it–a taste of the showing.  The second and much more powerful means is conversation.  This is initially Reb and Scott.  Scott has questions, and the reader has questions too.  Reb can answer many, but not all of his questions.  I think you can see, other conversations are then important to answer questions that Reb cannot.  Further, another part of showing is exploration.  Scott will explore the world of Freedom.  This excites him and the reader.  Here is more showing–its about the food the Citizens of Freedom eat.

Scott looked at the food in front of him. There were no utensils or plates. The food was entirely self-contained. The tray was made of a light grey synthetic material. He examined each piece of food. The closest to any food he was used to was a piece of something like bread. It was soft and light brown but didn’t crumble at all. He tasted it. It had something close to a flavor like bread and nuts. It tasted fresh and was fluffy. The second piece was like a small torte. There was a light brown crust with a yellow brown filling. He picked it up and bit into it. The flavor was similar to eggs and cheese. The crust was flaky, but didn’t crumble. Everything stuck together so nothing was lost or wasted—no trash, no mess. The third piece of food was an elongated sphere. It had a slightly elastic skin. Scott bit into it. The consistency was like fruit and it was somewhat sweet and juicy, but the juice didn’t drip from the pulp. He guessed it was artificial or synthetic—just like the others foods. The final large piece was a container filled with liquid. The container had an attached straw. The liquid was a little fizzy like a soft drink. It had a slightly citrus flavor.

Scott remembered, Reb also was issued another piece of food and a small lump that looked like candy. He had a piece of candy too. It was a small hard light green colored sphere. Her extra piece had been a caramel colored square. He had eaten and drank everything else. It was sufficient, but not enough to completely fill him. He popped the candy into his mouth. It had a slightly acrid and drug-like flavor at first. He wondered that he didn’t spit it out. He experienced a sudden burst of euphoria. He realized then that it was a drug. The flavor was like a cross between chocolate and mint—there was a creaminess to it. The euphoria lasted as long as the hard candy lasted.

His thinking was slightly befuddled because of the candy, but he began looking around at the posters and their slogans. The closest to him stated: Working is Freedom. He tried to get his slightly drugged mind around that—working is freedom. Another said: Property is Poverty, and another: Property is Captivity. Still another read: Life is Greater than Food and Wealth. There were more, but his mind had slowed to the point it was difficult for him to contemplate them. He sat in a daze until the lump of candy in his mouth was gone. Almost immediately, his head cleared. For a moment, all he could think about was another piece of candy. He glanced over at Reb. She was just popping the second piece of candy in her mouth—the square one. Her eyes went immediately blank. The other women at the table held similar expressions. They sat there for a few moments—their lips and mouths moved sucking every bit of drug and savor from the candy. Then one by one, as the candy disappeared, their faces returned to normal. Slowly, all the people were finishing their meals and leaving the place.

Synthetic food and drugs–this is what the Citizens of Freedom eat.  In the novel, I describe once each of the three meals the Citizens eat.  Later, I contrast this with the wonderful “real” food the Party Members eat.  The Citizens have no idea how lavish the food of the Party Members is.  It’s just like our food. The drugs are also part of dinner for each Citizen.  Scott sees two drugs in action.  There are more types of drugs that are used for different Citizens.  To learn about the drugs, Scott needs to hear from someone else.  Although Reb is an expert on chemicals, she is not savvy to the effects of the drugs on humans.  In Freedom, only the doctors are knowledgeable about the human effects of drugs.  As we saw yesterday, Reb has no idea about drugs in terms of human effects–her knowledge was specifically limited to chemicals.  She does understand how chemicals can affect smells, tastes, vision, and to a degree, the human body.  She doesn’t understand “drug” effects or the point of drugs to control humans.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

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