Writing Ideas – New Novel, part x26, Creative Elements in the World of Ancient Light, Warrior of Light

27 April 2017, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part x26, Creative Elements in the World of Ancient Light, Warrior of Light

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
  5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:

1.  The initial scene (the beginning)

2.  The rising action

3.  The climax

4.  The falling action

5.  The dénouement

I finished writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Curse. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, a dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Sorcha: Enchantment and the Curse.

 sorcha-cover
Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja. I’m also working on my 29th novel, working title School.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene: transition from input to output focused on the telic flaw resolution)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 28: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 29: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Here is the beginning of the method from the outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

To me, the most interesting themes are about worlds, people, and life that goes on around us that is hidden or unrealized. I have developed this type of world and theme and used it to build creative elements for my plots and scenes. I’ll use my own novels as examples for this. The next novel in the Ancient Light series is Warrior of Light. This novel is not on contract yet—I’m looking for a publisher.

The world of Ancient Light revolves around the idea of two ancient Egyptian goddesses who have been brought back into the 20th Century. In Warrior of Light, I reuse major creative elements. This is an important idea in series novels. You can reuse creative elements that fit from the previous novels and plots. In this case, I reuse China. I also reuse the Osiris Offering Tablet, the rescue of Alexandre and Lumie’re, Alexandre and Lumie’re’s children Sveta and Klava, Ceridwen, and the myths of ancient Britain. You can also add to this a self-discovery creative element with the protagonist as well as discovery creative elements related to Sveta and Klava.

There is much more to the creative elements. For example, one of the major creative elements is the competition between Sveta and Klava for a warrior. This is literally the driving creative element in the novel. Both girls have found a potential warrior. Sveta needs a fighter, and Klava needs an intellect. They find an intellect who Sveta molds into a fighter. This is a point of tension through the entire novel. This is one of my favorite novels. It includes the warrior, Daniel Longs’ own self-discovery as a man and a person. It includes the training of Daniel, Sveta, and Klava. It includes the rescue of Lumie’re and Alexandre, Sveta and Klava’s parents. There is a lot in this novel. The creative elements set it, drive it, and finish it. The next Ancient Light novel is Warrior of Darkness.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

 

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part x25, Creative Elements in the World of Ancient Light, Children of Light and Darkness

26 April 2017, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part x25, Creative Elements in the World of Ancient Light, Children of Light and Darkness

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
  5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:

1.  The initial scene (the beginning)

2.  The rising action

3.  The climax

4.  The falling action

5.  The dénouement

I finished writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Curse. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, a dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Sorcha: Enchantment and the Curse.

 sorcha-cover
Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja. I’m also working on my 29th novel, working title School.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene: transition from input to output focused on the telic flaw resolution)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 28: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 29: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Here is the beginning of the method from the outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

To me, the most interesting themes are about worlds, people, and life that goes on around us that is hidden or unrealized. I have developed this type of world and theme and used it to build creative elements for my plots and scenes. I’ll use my own novels as examples for this. The next novel in the Ancient Light series is Children of Light and Darkness. This novel is not on contract yet—I’m looking for a publisher.

The world of Ancient Light revolves around the idea of two ancient Egyptian goddesses who have been brought back into the 20th Century. In Children of Light and Darkness, the major creative elements become Burma, the Osiris Offering Tablet, the rescue of Alexandre and Lumie’re, Alexandre and Lumie’re’s children Sveta and Klava, Ceridwen, and the myths of ancient Britain.

Here are bold and not so bold creative elements. The boldest creative elements are the myths of ancient Britain. The big deal is the gods and goddesses of Britain and their interaction in the context of the Ancient Light novels. This novel, Children of Light and Darkness, is mainly about introducing the British myths more strongly into the ideas in Ancient Light. If you look at the creative elements, you can see the less bold, but they only look less bold.

The children are ten, and they were left in Burma by their parents. Actually, their parents are missing and might be dead. The girls are discovered by Kathrin and James who were sent to find Lumie’re and Alexandre. Now, imagine the cascading creative elements: girls will need an education, they will need a house, they will need stuff, and so on. Now imagine this—these girls are the daughters of a goddess. They have powers. They can be dangerous. Now, imagine them in school. Imagine them in an Anglican girl’s school. Imagine them learning about modern Britain and London. Now, can you see the picture? These creative elements grow from the initial ideas in the initial creative elements. The world of the novel grows from these and builds. The next Ancient Light novel is Warrior of Light.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part x24, Creative Elements in the World of Ancient Light, Shadow of Light

25 April 2017, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part x24, Creative Elements in the World of Ancient Light, Shadow of Light

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
  5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:

1.  The initial scene (the beginning)

2.  The rising action

3.  The climax

4.  The falling action

5.  The dénouement

I finished writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Curse. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, a dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Sorcha: Enchantment and the Curse.

 sorcha-cover
Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja. I’m also working on my 29th novel, working title School.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene: transition from input to output focused on the telic flaw resolution)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 28: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 29: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Here is the beginning of the method from the outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

To me, the most interesting themes are about worlds, people, and life that goes on around us that is hidden or unrealized. I have developed this type of world and theme and used it to build creative elements for my plots and scenes. I’ll use my own novels as examples for this. The next novel in the Ancient Light series is Shadow of Light. This novel is not on contract yet—I’m looking for a publisher.

The world of Ancient Light revolves around the idea of two ancient Egyptian goddesses who have been brought back into the 20th Century. In Shadow of Light, the major creative elements become the rise of China and Southeast Asia in world events, the Osiris Offering Tablet, Lumie’re (Paul and Leora’s daughter), British Foreign Service, British Intelligence, Lumie’re’s love Alexandre, and the myths of ancient China.

If you haven’t figured it out yet, the power of creative elements is really they build creativity. Just look at where we can go with Sister of Light from a historical standpoint. The times of the novel and the involvement of the British historically are amazing. This is the beginning of the Korean War, Vietnam, and other wars of Soviet and Chinese aggression. The West and the rest of the free world were involved in using diplomatic means to influence China and the Soviets. China and the Soviets were interested in forcing a confrontation, first in North Korea and second in Vietnam. These can only be seen historically from one point of view, but they are luscious with spies, intelligence, and secret work. Lumie’re and Alex are involved from Britain and the USA in these silent confrontations. There is more. Although the world of the modern era is filled with intrigue and excitement, the ancient world of Chinese myth and the supernatural is filled with interesting circumstance.

For example, a Dragon. Not just any dragon, but the Dragon who protects the north and east of China. Chinese deities didn’t fully develop from the stage of animism—they are more akin to natural forces that are fully personified than pantheonic deities. A Dragon is a being of power, logic, and reason. It is a creature of the Tao and of filial piety. The filial piety of a Dragon encompasses the entire land of China, but especially the rivers. Dragons are river deities. The creative element of the myths of China brings in so many other creative elements. For example, where would such a Dragon reside? How would you find such a creature? What would he look like? How would he speak? How powerful would he be? And so on. The answer to each of these lies in history and in the ideas of the Chinese people. The author mines these sources to produce nuggets of information and ideas to fill a novel. The next Ancient Light novel is Children of Darkness and Light.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing Ideas – New Novel, part x23, Creative Elements in the World of Ancient Light, Shadow of Darkness

24 April 2017, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part x23, Creative Elements in the World of Ancient Light, Shadow of Darkness

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
  5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:

1.  The initial scene (the beginning)

2.  The rising action

3.  The climax

4.  The falling action

5.  The dénouement

I finished writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Curse. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, a dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Sorcha: Enchantment and the Curse.

 sorcha-cover
Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja. I’m also working on my 29th novel, working title School.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene: transition from input to output focused on the telic flaw resolution)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 28: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 29: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Here is the beginning of the method from the outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

To me, the most interesting themes are about worlds, people, and life that goes on around us that is hidden or unrealized. I have developed this type of world and theme and used it to build creative elements for my plots and scenes. I’ll use my own novels as examples for this. The next novel in the Ancient Light series is Shadow of Darkness. This novel is not on contract yet—I’m looking for a publisher.

The world of Ancient Light revolves around the idea of two ancient Egyptian goddesses who have been brought back into the 20th Century. In Shadow of Darkness, the major creative elements become the end of World War II, the Osiris Offering Tablet, Lumiere’ (Paul and Leora’s daughter), the Orthodox Church, and Soviet Russia.

This novel is a discovery novel and continues the themes and creative elements introduced in the previous novels. It is still at standalone novel. All these novels are standalone. The discovery part of the novel comes out of Lumiere’s injury and loss of memory at the beginning. She is horribly injured and can’t remember anything about her previous life. Then the dreams begin.

Lumiere’ relives her life through World War II in dreams and flashbacks. These cause her terrible mental anguish that eventually leads her mentor to take her to the Orthodox Church. The Soviets want to send Lumiere’ to a people’s asylum—that is a mental institution. Within a convent, Lumiere’ gradually is exposed to other languages. She learns that she knows many languages. The Church uses her as a translator for the Patriarch of Moscow. Through this, she comes to the attention of the Soviet. This was all part of the Patriarch’s plan to place a spy into the NKVD and Stalin’s inner circle. Lumiere’ plays this witting spy. I think you can see how the creative elements bound and create the world of the novel. They are likewise cascading creative elements. For example, Lumiere’s language skills identify her to the NKVD. This also brings her to the attention of Stalin. Other important figures in the Soviet notice her. Lumiere comes to the attention of Stalin’s daughter, which comes around to Stalin again. At the same time, Lumiere learns that the Goddess of Darkness, who escaped at the end of Sister of Darkness is in China influencing Mao and the Chinese Communists. This builds another focus into the novel—a focus that turns into a romantic stream and other creative elements. You can see, these creative elements build the plot and scenes. A further creative element that moves through the whole of the novel is that of history. The happenings in the Soviet and in the rest of the world come into play as critical aspects of the novel.  All of these build and produce the scenes in the novel.  The next Ancient Light novel is Shadow of Light.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing Ideas – New Novel, part x22, Creative Elements in the World of Ancient Light, Sister of Darkness

23 April 2017, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part x22, Creative Elements in the World of Ancient Light, Sister of Darkness

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
  5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:

1.  The initial scene (the beginning)

2.  The rising action

3.  The climax

4.  The falling action

5.  The dénouement

I finished writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Curse. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, a dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Sorcha: Enchantment and the Curse.

 sorcha-cover
Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja. I’m also working on my 29th novel, working title School.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene: transition from input to output focused on the telic flaw resolution)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 28: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 29: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Here is the beginning of the method from the outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

To me, the most interesting themes are about worlds, people, and life that goes on around us that is hidden or unrealized. I have developed this type of world and theme and used it to build creative elements for my plots and scenes. I’ll use my own novels as examples for this. The next novel in the Ancient Light series is Sister of Darkness. This novel should be available in the next year. It is supposed to be published as a three-in-one with Aegypt and Sister of Light.

The world of Ancient Light revolves around the idea of two ancient Egyptian goddesses who have been brought back into the 20th Century. In Sister of Darkness, the major creative elements become World War II, the Osiris Offering Tablet, Lumiere’ (Paul and Leora’s daughter), and British Intelligence.

Additionally, I begin to feed in new creative elements in the supernatural part of this world. It is still our world, but the hidden part of our world. For example, Leora, the Goddess of Light, discovers the Gaelic and British gods and goddesses are still existent and are trying to protect Britain from the spiritual elements of the World War. Leora meets the major gods and goddesses of Britain. She also meets King George who knows about these beings. These are all ties of the real world we know and see in history with the world we imagine can exist in time and space. These elements make up the creative elements of the plot and the scenes of the novel. All of these are cascading creative elements. For example, Lumiere’ is captured by the servants of the Goddess of Darkness and brought to Germany. The reason is that Lumiere’ had and used the Osiris Offering Tablet. This tablet, a creative element, represents the power of the Goddess of Darkness. In the scope of the novel, the Goddess of Darkness teaches Lumiere’ to use the tablet. This is a touch of the supernatural. These creative elements touch each other and expand to new creative elements. The Goddess of Darkness’ servants are creative elements on their own. One of them, the head servant is Oba, who plays a part in future novels. In this novel, he is Lumiere’s’ jailor and protector. Another example, Lumiere’s kidnapping results in her parents working with British Intelligence to find her. That is a creative element. The problem is that the work of Paul and Leora with British Intelligence can’t just be to find their daughter. This is part of their plan, but only a tiny part of the importance of the mission that Paul, Leora, and their friend, Major Lyons embark on. These creative elements lead to other creative elements and so on.

My point is this, the author develops a world through the creative elements of the novel. These creative elements form the novel, but they also develop the entertainment in the novel. The creativity and the development of these elements are what make a novel worth reading. They also capture the imagination of readers and publishers. I’ll look at the creative elements in the world of my unpublished/uncontracted novels next.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part x21, Creative Elements in the World of Ancient Light, Sister of Light

22 April 2017, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part x21, Creative Elements in the World of Ancient Light, Sister of Light

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
  5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:

1.  The initial scene (the beginning)

2.  The rising action

3.  The climax

4.  The falling action

5.  The dénouement

I finished writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Curse. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, a dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Sorcha: Enchantment and the Curse.

 sorcha-cover
Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja. I’m also working on my 29th novel, working title School.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene: transition from input to output focused on the telic flaw resolution)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 28: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 29: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Here is the beginning of the method from the outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

To me, the most interesting themes are about worlds, people, and life that goes on around us that is hidden or unrealized. I have developed this type of world and theme and used it to build creative elements for my plots and scenes. I’ll use my own novels as examples for this. The next novel in the Ancient Light series is Sister of Light. This novel should be available in the next year. It is supposed to be published as a three-in-one with Aegypt and Sister of Darkness.

As I mentioned yesterday, the world of Ancient Light revolves around the idea of two ancient Egyptian goddesses who have been brought back into the 20th Century. The purpose of the novel, other than to entertain, is to entertain through this juxtaposition of ancient Egypt, ancient goddesses, modern history, and the French Foreign Legion. These are broadly the creative elements that move through all the Ancient Light novels.

In Sister of Light, the world expands to Paris in 1926. Paris is a creative element. Paul and Leora, the Goddess of Light, were married at the end of Aegypt. That is a creative element. The idea of a dark skinned Egyptian woman marrying a French officer is not well accepted in early Twentieth Century Europe. This is another creative element. Paul’s parents come on the scene. This is also a creative element. Further, we learn that Leora can’t handle lack of sunlight well. Paul plans an assignment to the United States of America to get Leroa to a place of greater sunlight. This is an important creative element that plays through this and the next novel—actually all the novels to one degree or another. In Sister of Light, we also mix children. These are creative elements. Additionally, Paul is sent on an important classified mission as the world moves toward war. One of the major creative elements in the novel is this mission and Paul’s disappearance. There is more, much much more, all creative elements that drive the plot and scenes of the novel. These creative elements are those that build the scenes and provide entertainment in the novel. As I noted there are many more creative elements woven into the novel. These creative elements all derive in some way from the original creative elements that form the theme and the plot of the novel. That is the idea of two Egyptian goddesses brought into the Twentieth Century. The world of Sister of Light is the same historical world the readers are used to, the only difference is this tiny add—that of beings who were ancient goddesses. This is also the unique flavor of the novel that drives the entertainment. If you look at is this way, a tiny concept drives an entire novel and the elements of entertainment in it.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part x20, Creative Elements in the World of Aegypt, Ancient Light

21 April 2017, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part x20, Creative Elements in the World of Aegypt, Ancient Light

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
  5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:

1.  The initial scene (the beginning)

2.  The rising action

3.  The climax

4.  The falling action

5.  The dénouement

I finished writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Curse. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, a dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Sorcha: Enchantment and the Curse.

 sorcha-cover
Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja. I’m also working on my 29th novel, working title School.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene: transition from input to output focused on the telic flaw resolution)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 28: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 29: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Here is the beginning of the method from the outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

To me, the most interesting themes are about worlds, people, and life that goes on around us that is hidden or unrealized. I have developed this type of world and theme and used it to build creative elements for my plots and scenes. I’ll use my own novels as examples for this. I’ll start with Aegypt. You can get Aegypt in paperback or in most electronic book formats. Aegypt is the first Ancient Light novel.

The world of Aegypt works on two levels. The first level is that of the ancient world revealed and brought into the modern world. This is a motif and a creative element. This creative element runs through all the novels in the Ancient Light series. The main focus of this element are beings who appear to be human but who retain powers outside of human understanding. They were venerated as gods in the ancient world. They are similar to our concept of gods and goddesses. In the novels, this creative element, embodied by the characters, is used as a subtext of a world outside of the human norm. This creative element builds and expands in the other Ancient Light novels.

In Aegypt, two goddesses from ancient Egypt are brought back into the world in 1926. The creative element is the idea that there could actually be goddesses and a means of preserving them for 3,500 years to come back to life. Many of the ideas and creative elements in the novel comes directly out of Egyptian myth and history. In Aegypt the idea or creative element begins as a mystery and suspense concept, but this idea undergirds the entire series and builds on each of the creative elements. As I noted, this singular creative element drives the theme and the main portion of the plot. You can imagine the cascading creative elements that derive from this idea.

On a purely historical level, the world of 1926 in Tunisia is also a creative element that builds the world of Aegypt. The French Foreign Legion is the major force providing power and law in this French colony. Languages are varied and build a subtext and another creative element into the story. The history of Tunisia in 1926 and the subtext of history from Egypt in the 21st Dynasty are both exactly historically correct and are creative elements on their own. These are all major features of my novels: historical accuracy, historical relevance, revelation of hidden or secret ideas from a historical basis, languages, cultures, military operations, intellectualism, and art. All of these are evident in Aegypt and begin to build the world within a world that forms Ancient Light.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment