Writing – part x873, Writing a Novel, Changing World and more Scientific Truth

22 August 2019, Writing – part x873, Writing a Novel, Changing World and more Scientific Truth

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker          

Today:  Why don’t we go back to the basics and just writing a novel?  I can tell you what I do, and show you how I go about putting a novel together.  We can start with developing an idea then move into the details of the writing.

To start a novel, I picture an initial scene.  I may start from a protagonist or just launch into mental development of an initial scene.  I get the idea for an initial scene from all kinds of sources.  To help get the creative juices flowing, let’s look at the initial scene.

  1. Meeting between the protagonist and the antagonist or the protagonist’s helper
  2. Action point in the plot
  3. Buildup to an exciting scene
  4. Indirect introduction of the protagonist

The protagonist is the novel and the initial scene.  If you look at the four basic types of initial scenes, you see the reflection of the protagonist in each one.  If you noticed my examples yesterday, I expressed the scene idea, but none were completely independent of the protagonist.  Indeed, in most cases, I get an idea with a protagonist.  The protagonist is incomplete, but a sketch to begin with.  You can start with a protagonist, but in my opinion, as we see above, the protagonist is never completely independent from the initial scene.  As the ideas above imply, we can start with the characters, specifically the protagonist, antagonist or protagonist’s helper, and develop an initial scene.

Let’s look at a subject that is really ignored in the modern era.  I’m not certain how much this can help your current writing.  I would argue that theoretically, this subject can really help those who write historical and futuristic fiction.  It depends on how your write your historical and futuristic fiction.  There are two ways to write historical fiction—let’s look at this.

The first and most common way to write historical fiction is to write a novel that projects modern ideas and history as historical ideas and history.  In other words to present modern ideas and historical ideas as the same.  I think this is perhaps the most egregious and perverse means of presenting a false view of history.  The author is either completely ignorant of the past, is intentionally attempting to education people in a false view of history, or both.  The real historical world is very different both culturally and socially from our current world.  The true author attempts to convey this in historical writing.

The second and less common means of historical writing is to actually incorporate the past into a novel to convey the actual way people thought and acted in the past.  This approach actually goes back into time to give a complete view of the way the people thought and acted.  To this end, let’s look at how the world changed and how people thought in the past.  This is more of a historical look at the world for the purpose of understanding how the world worked in the past and how people thought and acted.  We’ll use historical information to see what concerned affected their lives. Here is a list of potential issues.  We’ll look at them in detail:

  1. Vocabulary
  2. Ideas
  3. Social construction
  4. Culture
  5. Politics
  6. History
  7. Language
  8. Common knowledge
  9. Common sense
  10. Reflected culture
  11. Reflected history
  12. Reflected society
  13. Truth
  14. Food
  15. Weapons
  16. Transportation
  17. Communication
  18. Writing

What is truth?  Actually, this isn’t a very difficult question to answer.  My personal opinion is that a person who doesn’t know how to discover the truth is uneducated and inexperienced.  The Greeks developed the three means to know truth starting back about 500 BC.

The Greeks discovered they could prove truth about non-repeatable events through the historical-legal method.  This method works well enough to put people in jail or to death.  It’s also used to prove historical truth—it works with non-repeatable events.  The Greeks also invented logic—they used it to prove assertions that were not readily obvious in the real world—mathematics and philosophy.  Most likely through logic, Aristotle realized something about the world.  Perhaps other Greeks before Aristotle contemplated this, but he put it into practice and developed a method for it.  We call this method the scientific method.

Although the scientific method is used to prove repeatable events, unfortunately, no matter how well we measure and conduct our experiments, the results are never ever exactly the same—how can this be.  Is there something in the world that prevents exactness in repeatable events?  In fact, there is.

From the world side there is chaos theory and probability theory.  If you remember, I wrote that mathematics doesn’t exist in the real world—it is a construct in logic.  Nothing in the real world ever works out as precisely as mathematics does, but how can this be?  The reason is first probability theory and chaos math.

When I describe probability theory, I explain that probability theory explains why a one foot putt won’t always go in the cup.  Probability affects everything from an atomic and molecular level.  The electrons of each atom can be predicted to be within a sphere of probability around the nucleus, but the exact location of any one electron can never be known.  You might think that the undetermined and undeterminable location of a single or even a handful of electrons might make no difference in the world, and you’d be right.  It isn’t a handful, it’s billions and trillions of electrons, and this massive uncertainty affects our world and every experiment (repeatable event) enough that we can measure it.  We can’t measure it precisely enough to predict its overall effects, but we sure can use math to corner it.  This is the standard deviation we gather, measure, and calculate that shows how much deviation there is in the world through probability, except that’s not exactly right.  I noted that if we could predict the effects of probability, we could also predict the standard deviation.  We can measure, but not accurately predict.  How can that be?

There is chaos theory to contend with.  If probability theory is the reason you won’t hit the cup with every two foot putt, chaos is the reason you just might be able to make most of them.  Chaos theory is completely mischaracterized in popular literature.  Most people think that chaos theory shows that a butterfly flapping its wings in China could cause a wind storm in the USA.  This is far from the idea of chaos theory.  Chaos theory states that any system that appears random at a macro level can be shown to form a degree of order at a micro level.  The prefect example is chaotic flow in aero and hydrodynamics…also Brownian motion.  Chaotic flow looks chaotic at a macro level.  As the experimenter peels back the layers of order to a micro level, we see that chaotic flow forms a mathematically predictable flow field.  The math is complex and the flow is many times complex, but it is predictable to a degree.  We also find, although the precise measure is impossible, the aggregate flow is measurable and predictable within a standard deviation.  All this is pretty neat stuff.  There are likely many more ideas and theories to be discovered.

The important point is this, we have three means to prove truth in the world.  More next time.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing – part x872, Writing a Novel, Changing World and Scientific Truth

21 August 2019, Writing – part x872, Writing a Novel, Changing World and Scientific Truth

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker          

Today:  Why don’t we go back to the basics and just writing a novel?  I can tell you what I do, and show you how I go about putting a novel together.  We can start with developing an idea then move into the details of the writing.

To start a novel, I picture an initial scene.  I may start from a protagonist or just launch into mental development of an initial scene.  I get the idea for an initial scene from all kinds of sources.  To help get the creative juices flowing, let’s look at the initial scene.

  1. Meeting between the protagonist and the antagonist or the protagonist’s helper
  2. Action point in the plot
  3. Buildup to an exciting scene
  4. Indirect introduction of the protagonist

The protagonist is the novel and the initial scene.  If you look at the four basic types of initial scenes, you see the reflection of the protagonist in each one.  If you noticed my examples yesterday, I expressed the scene idea, but none were completely independent of the protagonist.  Indeed, in most cases, I get an idea with a protagonist.  The protagonist is incomplete, but a sketch to begin with.  You can start with a protagonist, but in my opinion, as we see above, the protagonist is never completely independent from the initial scene.  As the ideas above imply, we can start with the characters, specifically the protagonist, antagonist or protagonist’s helper, and develop an initial scene.

Let’s look at a subject that is really ignored in the modern era.  I’m not certain how much this can help your current writing.  I would argue that theoretically, this subject can really help those who write historical and futuristic fiction.  It depends on how your write your historical and futuristic fiction.  There are two ways to write historical fiction—let’s look at this.

The first and most common way to write historical fiction is to write a novel that projects modern ideas and history as historical ideas and history.  In other words to present modern ideas and historical ideas as the same.  I think this is perhaps the most egregious and perverse means of presenting a false view of history.  The author is either completely ignorant of the past, is intentionally attempting to education people in a false view of history, or both.  The real historical world is very different both culturally and socially from our current world.  The true author attempts to convey this in historical writing.

The second and less common means of historical writing is to actually incorporate the past into a novel to convey the actual way people thought and acted in the past.  This approach actually goes back into time to give a complete view of the way the people thought and acted.  To this end, let’s look at how the world changed and how people thought in the past.  This is more of a historical look at the world for the purpose of understanding how the world worked in the past and how people thought and acted.  We’ll use historical information to see what concerned affected their lives. Here is a list of potential issues.  We’ll look at them in detail:

  1. Vocabulary
  2. Ideas
  3. Social construction
  4. Culture
  5. Politics
  6. History
  7. Language
  8. Common knowledge
  9. Common sense
  10. Reflected culture
  11. Reflected history
  12. Reflected society
  13. Truth
  14. Food
  15. Weapons
  16. Transportation
  17. Communication
  18. Writing

What is truth?  Actually, this isn’t a very difficult question to answer.  My personal opinion is that a person who doesn’t know how to discover the truth is uneducated and inexperienced.  The Greeks developed the three means to know truth starting back about 500 BC.

The Greeks discovered they could prove truth about non-repeatable events through the historical-legal method.  This method works well enough to put people in jail or to death.  It’s also used to prove historical truth—it works with non-repeatable events.  The Greeks also invented logic—they used it to prove assertions that were not readily obvious in the real world—mathematics and philosophy.  Most likely through logic, Aristotle realized something about the world and repeatable events.  Perhaps other Greeks before Aristotle contemplated this, but he put it into practice and developed a method for it.  We call this method the scientific method.

The scientific method is used to prove repeatable events.  Let us be very clear about this, because the Greeks were—you can’t use the historical-legal method to prove repeatable events, and you can’t use the scientific method to prove non-repeatable events.  Likewise, the scientific method and the historical-legal method can only be used to prove things which are measurable in the real world.  They can’t be used to prove philosophy or mathematics.  So then, what are repeatable events.

Let’s say I drop a ball from a measured distance and time its descent to the ground.  If I set up my experiment properly, every time I drop the ball, I will get a different answer, but the answer will be very close to all the others.  How can that be?  Aren’t all the forces acting on that ball the same?  Of course they are, the problem isn’t with the real world.  The problem is with my measurement devices and my experimental apparatus.  This variance in results occurs with every repeatable phenomena.  The problem isn’t completely in the world, but there are some issues.

First, you might ask, how do we fix experimental variability?  That’s easy.  We fix it through mathematics.  I make enough experiments—repeat the experiment enough times to reach a confidence interval.  Next, I calculate a standard deviation for the experimental results and determine the true mean.  All the results theoretically should fall within the standard deviation, and I can get a true mean for the results.  Third, for many experiments once I determine a value for the forces, I can calculate the results and check the experiment mathematically.  For example, for the ball experiment, I can calculate the pull of gravity, the time and velocity of the ball when it hits the ground.  I can further calculate the force.  All of this is pretty neat, and this is basically how science works.  Of course, I use the historical-legal method to record my scientific method results.  Then others can check my work and check the repeatability of my experiment.  I should give you the scientific method as we apply it today:

  1. Deduce a theory
  2. Design an experiment to prove the theory
  3. Conduct the experiment
  4. Analyze the results to see if the theory holds
  5. Repeat as necessary

As you can see, the scientific method is dependent on repeatability—repeatability of the experiment, the theory, and the method itself.  From a macro standpoint, the problem with repeatability and experiments is apparatus and measurement capability, and I showed you how we fix that through mathematics.  This, by the way is why logic had to come before the invention of the scientific method.  Unfortunately, no matter how well we measure and conduct our experiments, the results are never ever exactly the same—how can this be.  Is there something in the world that prevents exactness in repeatable events?  In fact, there is.

From the world side there is chaos theory and probability theory.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing – part x871, Writing a Novel, Changing World and more Logical Truth

20 August 2019, Writing – part x871, Writing a Novel, Changing World and more Logical Truth

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker           

Today:  Why don’t we go back to the basics and just writing a novel?  I can tell you what I do, and show you how I go about putting a novel together.  We can start with developing an idea then move into the details of the writing.

To start a novel, I picture an initial scene.  I may start from a protagonist or just launch into mental development of an initial scene.  I get the idea for an initial scene from all kinds of sources.  To help get the creative juices flowing, let’s look at the initial scene.

  1. Meeting between the protagonist and the antagonist or the protagonist’s helper
  2. Action point in the plot
  3. Buildup to an exciting scene
  4. Indirect introduction of the protagonist

The protagonist is the novel and the initial scene.  If you look at the four basic types of initial scenes, you see the reflection of the protagonist in each one.  If you noticed my examples yesterday, I expressed the scene idea, but none were completely independent of the protagonist.  Indeed, in most cases, I get an idea with a protagonist.  The protagonist is incomplete, but a sketch to begin with.  You can start with a protagonist, but in my opinion, as we see above, the protagonist is never completely independent from the initial scene.  As the ideas above imply, we can start with the characters, specifically the protagonist, antagonist or protagonist’s helper, and develop an initial scene.

Let’s look at a subject that is really ignored in the modern era.  I’m not certain how much this can help your current writing.  I would argue that theoretically, this subject can really help those who write historical and futuristic fiction.  It depends on how your write your historical and futuristic fiction.  There are two ways to write historical fiction—let’s look at this.

The first and most common way to write historical fiction is to write a novel that projects modern ideas and history as historical ideas and history.  In other words to present modern ideas and historical ideas as the same.  I think this is perhaps the most egregious and perverse means of presenting a false view of history.  The author is either completely ignorant of the past, is intentionally attempting to education people in a false view of history, or both.  The real historical world is very different both culturally and socially from our current world.  The true author attempts to convey this in historical writing.

The second and less common means of historical writing is to actually incorporate the past into a novel to convey the actual way people thought and acted in the past.  This approach actually goes back into time to give a complete view of the way the people thought and acted.  To this end, let’s look at how the world changed and how people thought in the past.  This is more of a historical look at the world for the purpose of understanding how the world worked in the past and how people thought and acted.  We’ll use historical information to see what concerned affected their lives. Here is a list of potential issues.  We’ll look at them in detail:

  1. Vocabulary
  2. Ideas
  3. Social construction
  4. Culture
  5. Politics
  6. History
  7. Language
  8. Common knowledge
  9. Common sense
  10. Reflected culture
  11. Reflected history
  12. Reflected society
  13. Truth
  14. Food
  15. Weapons
  16. Transportation
  17. Communication
  18. Writing

What is truth?  Actually, this isn’t a very difficult question to answer.  My personal opinion is that a person who doesn’t know how to discover the truth is uneducated and inexperienced.  The Greeks developed the three means to know truth starting back about 500 BC.

The Greeks wondered, no, the Greeks knew there were other things in the world which were real, but not discernable or measurable.  History and the historical-legal method could not prove them.  The Greeks had an inkling that logic could.

Think about it.  Spiritual things, gods, emotions, thoughts, ideas, all these things can’t really be measured in the real world.  The Greeks took what they learned in logic as applied to geometry and proofs.  On the way, they invented philosophy.  Philosophy uses logic and the historical-legal method to reason and then record that reasoning.

Logic and reasoning propelled philosophy and later theology.  As I noted, with the historical-legal method, the philosopher could then record their philosophical reasoning and we got Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Zeno, and all those great Greek and later other philosophers.  The Greeks had the right idea.  They applied logic to everything they could.  Their most important question was to prove god and define the spiritual.  They also wanted to define the ge (the real world), but logic wasn’t as fitted for this job as was another tool.  I’ll get to that later.

In any case, the Greeks used logic and reasoning to try to understand and define the world and their perception of reality.  This moved in history to philosophy and then theology.  Philosophy then and now was interested in many questions and ideas.  Logic can be used to evaluate all kinds of real and intellectual ideas.  It can be used to define truth in all kinds of ways, and it can be used to support the historical-legal method.  The most important question for philosophy is the proof and person of god.

Philosophy examined this idea from the beginning.  If you didn’t know, Emmanuel Kant proved that the not god can’t exist.  If you remember from geometry, you can’t prove a true—you can only prove a not true.  Since you can’t prove a true, the logistician (philosopher) defines the proof of anything as a proof that the not true must not exist.  The Greeks knew this and Emmanuel Kant proved the not god can’t exist—there must be a god.  So, Emmanuel Kant solved the greatest problem in philosophy and reason.  If you wondered, that’s what happened to philosophy.

You might have noticed the lethargy and silliness of modern philosophy.  The reason is that no one can prove Emmanuel Kant wrong.  His proof of God is remarkable and so far, not refutable.  Philosophy hasn’t stopped trying, but today philosophy has become less than a distraction.  In fact, they didn’t stop teaching philosophy, but they stopped teaching logic and reasoning.  I guess the modern philosophers are embarrassed or irritated at what Kant has done.  I would have thought they would have shouted the results of Kant’s proof to the heavens.  It proves the great question of mankind—there is a God, there has to be.

If you don’t think this is a big deal, perhaps you are a philosopher.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing – part x870, Writing a Novel, Changing World and Logical Truth

19 August 2019, Writing – part x870, Writing a Novel, Changing World and Logical Truth

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker          

Today:  Why don’t we go back to the basics and just writing a novel?  I can tell you what I do, and show you how I go about putting a novel together.  We can start with developing an idea then move into the details of the writing.

To start a novel, I picture an initial scene.  I may start from a protagonist or just launch into mental development of an initial scene.  I get the idea for an initial scene from all kinds of sources.  To help get the creative juices flowing, let’s look at the initial scene.

  1. Meeting between the protagonist and the antagonist or the protagonist’s helper
  2. Action point in the plot
  3. Buildup to an exciting scene
  4. Indirect introduction of the protagonist

The protagonist is the novel and the initial scene.  If you look at the four basic types of initial scenes, you see the reflection of the protagonist in each one.  If you noticed my examples yesterday, I expressed the scene idea, but none were completely independent of the protagonist.  Indeed, in most cases, I get an idea with a protagonist.  The protagonist is incomplete, but a sketch to begin with.  You can start with a protagonist, but in my opinion, as we see above, the protagonist is never completely independent from the initial scene.  As the ideas above imply, we can start with the characters, specifically the protagonist, antagonist or protagonist’s helper, and develop an initial scene.

Let’s look at a subject that is really ignored in the modern era.  I’m not certain how much this can help your current writing.  I would argue that theoretically, this subject can really help those who write historical and futuristic fiction.  It depends on how your write your historical and futuristic fiction.  There are two ways to write historical fiction—let’s look at this.

The first and most common way to write historical fiction is to write a novel that projects modern ideas and history as historical ideas and history.  In other words to present modern ideas and historical ideas as the same.  I think this is perhaps the most egregious and perverse means of presenting a false view of history.  The author is either completely ignorant of the past, is intentionally attempting to education people in a false view of history, or both.  The real historical world is very different both culturally and socially from our current world.  The true author attempts to convey this in historical writing.

The second and less common means of historical writing is to actually incorporate the past into a novel to convey the actual way people thought and acted in the past.  This approach actually goes back into time to give a complete view of the way the people thought and acted.  To this end, let’s look at how the world changed and how people thought in the past.  This is more of a historical look at the world for the purpose of understanding how the world worked in the past and how people thought and acted.  We’ll use historical information to see what concerned affected their lives. Here is a list of potential issues.  We’ll look at them in detail:

  1. Vocabulary
  2. Ideas
  3. Social construction
  4. Culture
  5. Politics
  6. History
  7. Language
  8. Common knowledge
  9. Common sense
  10. Reflected culture
  11. Reflected history
  12. Reflected society
  13. Truth
  14. Food
  15. Weapons
  16. Transportation
  17. Communication
  18. Writing

What is truth?  Actually, this isn’t a very difficult question to answer.  My personal opinion is that a person who doesn’t know how to discover the truth is uneducated and inexperienced.  The Greeks developed the three means to know truth starting back about 500 BC.

The historical-legal method is what we use today to prove history (non-repeatable events).  Yesterday, I explained what the historical-legal method is, and how the Greeks invented it.  Next, the Greeks invented logic.

When I write that they invented logic, I don’t mean they were the first and only to use logic, I mean then invented the rules to be used in developing a logical argument.  They needed logic to develop geometric proofs.  You are likely familiar with geometric proofs.  Every educated person in the modern world should have studied geometry and trigonometry. The purpose of geometry is the development of geometric proofs.  In our studies today, these also include algebraic and arithmetic proofs.  The Greeks, unfortunately didn’t have algebra and adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing in base five is painful.  Not to mention powers and logs.

In any case, the Greeks wanted logic mainly for geometry.  The reason was that geometry is all about ideals and not the real.  The real can’t be used in mathematics because math is repeatable, but it results in absolute answers.  Nothing in the world results in absolute answers—that is unless you want to talk about history.  For example, I can define things in the past because they can’t change.  I can use the historical-legal method to define absolutes in history, but these are still not the same as absolutes in mathematics.

In math, 1+1 usually equals 2.  That is part of the problem.  You have to define the 1+1.  If I have one apple and one orange 1+1 equals 2 fruits but not 2 oranges or apples.  You have to be working in the same set of variables or define them.  This is what logic is all about.

In a logical argument, I have to:

  1. Define the terms.
  2. Define the assumptions
  3. Present my argument
  4. Apply the conclusion

Here’s an example.

      Definitions: A, B, and C are real numbers

      Assumption: Equals (=) means they are the same number or value

      Argument: If A=B and B=C then A=C

      Conclusion: A=C

This works great in mathematics and geometry.  Mathematics and geometry are concepts that exist outside the real space of the world.  They are very worthwhile, but they are not real elements in the world—they are creations of logic that exist only in theory.  For example, no two things can ever be the same—I must define them to fill a set of similar objects.  I can show you how mathematics works, and make some demonstrations, but I challenge you to show me pi in the real world.

Pi is an impossible thing to show in the real world.  Pi is an irrational number.  It can’t be shown with a fraction, but it is a real concept and a real number, but it can’t be depicted using numbers only through a symbol.  The symbol pi represents the circumference of any circle divided by its diameter.  You can see that although this exists in the real world, it is a concept that is truly real in the geometric plane.  The Greeks wondered, no the Greeks knew there were other things in the world which were real, but not discernable.  History and the historical-legal method could not prove them.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing – part x869, Writing a Novel, Changing World and Truth

18 August 2019, Writing – part x869, Writing a Novel, Changing World and Truth

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker          

Today:  Why don’t we go back to the basics and just writing a novel?  I can tell you what I do, and show you how I go about putting a novel together.  We can start with developing an idea then move into the details of the writing.

To start a novel, I picture an initial scene.  I may start from a protagonist or just launch into mental development of an initial scene.  I get the idea for an initial scene from all kinds of sources.  To help get the creative juices flowing, let’s look at the initial scene.

  1. Meeting between the protagonist and the antagonist or the protagonist’s helper
  2. Action point in the plot
  3. Buildup to an exciting scene
  4. Indirect introduction of the protagonist

The protagonist is the novel and the initial scene.  If you look at the four basic types of initial scenes, you see the reflection of the protagonist in each one.  If you noticed my examples yesterday, I expressed the scene idea, but none were completely independent of the protagonist.  Indeed, in most cases, I get an idea with a protagonist.  The protagonist is incomplete, but a sketch to begin with.  You can start with a protagonist, but in my opinion, as we see above, the protagonist is never completely independent from the initial scene.  As the ideas above imply, we can start with the characters, specifically the protagonist, antagonist or protagonist’s helper, and develop an initial scene.

Let’s look at a subject that is really ignored in the modern era.  I’m not certain how much this can help your current writing.  I would argue that theoretically, this subject can really help those who write historical and futuristic fiction.  It depends on how your write your historical and futuristic fiction.  There are two ways to write historical fiction—let’s look at this.

The first and most common way to write historical fiction is to write a novel that projects modern ideas and history as historical ideas and history.  In other words to present modern ideas and historical ideas as the same.  I think this is perhaps the most egregious and perverse means of presenting a false view of history.  The author is either completely ignorant of the past, is intentionally attempting to education people in a false view of history, or both.  The real historical world is very different both culturally and socially from our current world.  The true author attempts to convey this in historical writing.

The second and less common means of historical writing is to actually incorporate the past into a novel to convey the actual way people thought and acted in the past.  This approach actually goes back into time to give a complete view of the way the people thought and acted.  To this end, let’s look at how the world changed and how people thought in the past.  This is more of a historical look at the world for the purpose of understanding how the world worked in the past and how people thought and acted.  We’ll use historical information to see what concerned affected their lives. Here is a list of potential issues.  We’ll look at them in detail:

  1. Vocabulary
  2. Ideas
  3. Social construction
  4. Culture
  5. Politics
  6. History
  7. Language
  8. Common knowledge
  9. Common sense
  10. Reflected culture
  11. Reflected history
  12. Reflected society
  13. Truth
  14. Food
  15. Weapons
  16. Transportation
  17. Communication
  18. Writing

What is truth?  Actually, this isn’t a very difficult question to answer.  My personal opinion is that a person who doesn’t know how to discover the truth is uneducated and inexperienced.  The Greeks developed the three means to know truth starting back about 500 BC.

Around 500 BC, the Greeks realized that it might be a good idea to write down human history.  The Hebrews had been doing this for a while before the Greeks, and the Greeks might have gotten their ideas from the Hebrews, but the Hebrews’ focus wasn’t on human history or really Hebrew history.  The Hebrew’s focus was on the revelation of Jehovah (God) in their history.  Some other groups had written about spiritual revelations, but most of those were not concerned with history.  What the Greeks realized was the means to determine truth in the record of history.

I’m not asserting that they accomplished this immediately or that they had a coherent plan to design the historical-legal method, but the method for knowing truth in history, the historical-legal method, was the result of their development of recording history.

The historical-legal method was the first method developed by the Greeks to know truth.  As the name implies, it is used for history and in legal proceedings.  Once I remind you, you will recognize the background of this method.  Here’s how the historical-legal method works.

First, we take a record of history or in the case of a legal proceeding, we take a witness.  The record of history is also called a witness.  There are three types of witnesses: primary, secondary, and tertiary.  A primary witness is an eyewitness.  Just like a court of law, in history, the primacy of witness places an eyewitness (primary witness) as the most reliable source.  An eyewitness is a witness who actually saw, heard, smelled, tasted, and/or felt the event or occurrence.  In history, just as in a court, a primary witness is considered the most accurate witness.  In a court where I might have more than one eyewitness, the court (jury and/or judge) must weigh the value, knowledge, and quality of the witnesses.  You see this all the time in sports where the judges (umpires) view multiple replays to determine if a play was legal or not.  In a court of law, the verdict of the judges and jury might determine the fate of a person.  In most cases, only eyewitnesses are allowed.  In history, a secondary witness is considered inferior to a primary witness, but it is used and worthwhile.  A secondary witness is the record of an eyewitness taken by another source.  For example, Mary Todd Lincoln was an eyewitness to her husband’s (President Lincoln) death.  Mary Todd Lincoln’s self-authored, recorded (there was no recording machines at the time), or directly quoted account of the event would be considered a primary source.  On the other hand, if a journalist interviewed Mary Todd outside the Ford Theater, that journalist’s account would be considered a secondary witness.  In a court of law, a secondary witness is called a hearsay witness.  It is usually not allowed.  A secondary witness is well accepted in history.  However, the rule of primacy always applies.

The rule of primacy is that an eyewitness account is always considered more accurate than a secondary account, and a secondary witness is always considered more accurate than a tertiary account.  Very rarely are primary accounts ever discounted in history.  There would have to be overwhelming evidence that the primary source was wrong or mistaken.  In almost one hundred percent of the cases in historical evidence a primary source is always trusted more than a secondary or tertiary witness. There is much more to this, but you likely would like to know what a tertiary source is.

A tertiary source is one that is not primary or secondary.  A tertiary source is a history book, or should I write a book about history.  This is why historians and historical fiction writers don’t use history books to write their histories or historical fiction.  Historians always use primary and secondary sources if they have them.  They only rely on tertiary sources if there is no other option.  In a court of law, only a primary witness is used to prove the truth of what happened.  And here is the point of everything.

The historical-legal method is used to prove the truth of events that happened or could happen only once.  It is specifically used to prove the truth of events in history, historical events.  This is how you can prove that certain historical figures lived, events occurred, and things happened.  There is no other method, and stuff before human literacy or literary evidence becomes impossible to prove historically.  However, in history, every piece of evidence is a piece of evidence.  You can’t discount any account of history that is declared to be history and asserted to be a primary, secondary, or tertiary source…unless you have another source of equal measure that directly contradicts your source.

For example, let’s say Caesar (pick one) wrote that he crossed the Rhine River on 2 July 60 AD and engaged the Teutonic forces of Beowulf.  During the battle the Romans were being overcome but Caesar had his personal priest sacrifice to the goddess Diana and as a result, the rain began and flooded the positions of Beowulf.  Caesar is an eyewitness (primary source), and none of his account can be debated unless you have another source of better primacy.  Let’s say after the battle Caesar’s priest interrogated the captured Beowulf (that’s a secondary source).  Beowulf said his priest predicted they would win the battle and the rain caught them all by surprise, but he thought the Roman’s training and weapons were what won the day.  As a historian, you can’t discount Caesar’s account or opinions.  That doesn’t mean you have to accept his worldview.  It means, you must accept his record of the events, about Caesar’s opinions, that’s something else.  He is a primary source.  On the other hand, Beowulf’s account is a secondary source.  You might agree with his opinion more than Caesar’s but as a historian, all you can do is corroborate the events.  If Beowulf in any way contradicted Caesar, you are required by primacy of witness to accept Caesar’s account.  Further, if the priest’s son who was not present at the battle wrote an account, his record of his father’s remembrances would be secondary, but anything else would be tertiary.

The historical-legal method is what we use today to prove history (non-repeatable events).

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing – part x868, Writing a Novel, Changing World and Reflected Society

17 August 2019, Writing – part x868, Writing a Novel, Changing World and Reflected Society

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker          

Today:  Why don’t we go back to the basics and just writing a novel?  I can tell you what I do, and show you how I go about putting a novel together. We can start with developing an idea then move into the details of the writing.

To start a novel, I picture an initial scene.  I may start from a protagonist or just launch into mental development of an initial scene.  I get the idea for an initial scene from all kinds of sources.  To help get the creative juices flowing, let’s look at the initial scene.

  1. Meeting between the protagonist and the antagonist or the protagonist’s helper
  2. Action point in the plot
  3. Buildup to an exciting scene
  4. Indirect introduction of the protagonist

The protagonist is the novel and the initial scene.  If you look at the four basic types of initial scenes, you see the reflection of the protagonist in each one.  If you noticed my examples yesterday, I expressed the scene idea, but none were completely independent of the protagonist.  Indeed, in most cases, I get an idea with a protagonist.  The protagonist is incomplete, but a sketch to begin with.  You can start with a protagonist, but in my opinion, as we see above, the protagonist is never completely independent from the initial scene.  As the ideas above imply, we can start with the characters, specifically the protagonist, antagonist or protagonist’s helper, and develop an initial scene.

Let’s look at a subject that is really ignored in the modern era.  I’m not certain how much this can help your current writing.  I would argue that theoretically, this subject can really help those who write historical and futuristic fiction.  It depends on how your write your historical and futuristic fiction.  There are two ways to write historical fiction—let’s look at this.

The first and most common way to write historical fiction is to write a novel that projects modern ideas and history as historical ideas and history.  In other words to present modern ideas and historical ideas as the same.  I think this is perhaps the most egregious and perverse means of presenting a false view of history.  The author is either completely ignorant of the past, is intentionally attempting to education people in a false view of history, or both.  The real historical world is very different both culturally and socially from our current world.  The true author attempts to convey this in historical writing.

The second and less common means of historical writing is to actually incorporate the past into a novel to convey the actual way people thought and acted in the past.  This approach actually goes back into time to give a complete view of the way the people thought and acted.  To this end, let’s look at how the world changed and how people thought in the past.  This is more of a historical look at the world for the purpose of understanding how the world worked in the past and how people thought and acted.  We’ll use historical information to see what concerned affected their lives. Here is a list of potential issues.  We’ll look at them in detail:

  1. Vocabulary
  2. Ideas
  3. Social construction
  4. Culture
  5. Politics
  6. History
  7. Language
  8. Common knowledge
  9. Common sense
  10. Reflected culture
  11. Reflected history
  12. Reflected society
  13. Truth
  14. Food
  15. Weapons
  16. Transportation
  17. Communication
  18. Writing

In writing, the author must define the real, reflected, and the created.  If you notice, this fits directly into the different worldviews or settings.  The real is completely real in setting or worldview.  The reflected is real however, it includes concepts that are not necessarily real but some or many humans agree with either historically, ideologically, religiously, or theoretically agree or know about them.  For example, myths, imaginary creatures like dragons, vampires, and fairies, gods and goddesses, and all.  Created means invented or extrapolated—basically science fiction.  The real is the known and the knowable.  The fiction trade space is the unknown and the unknowable.

I’ll begin with the example of the most famous modern reflected society—that is the society of Harry Potty.  In Harry Potty, the author developed a reflected and a created society based on magic that interspersed itself in the modern real world.  All reflected societies accomplish this to a degree.  The author is developing a reflected and a created society within the bounds of common knowledge and common sense.

The definition of the terms of common sense come from the real world and the reflected world.  Thus, the author of Harry Potty builds a magical system that fits specific criteria and presents it as a reflected culture.  This all works as long as the author presents a system that makes sense.  For example, if the author said Jack Sprat a person of normal attributes waved their hands and said a fake Latin statement and something magically happened, the reader would reject the magical culture and society.  On the other hand, if the author states that Jack Sprat is one of the few endued with magic, waves his hands, and special wands, and spouts a fake Latin statement, suddenly, that is magic.  The reader sees this as a sensible statement within the context of the magical culture.  It is a culture with rules for magic.

The society likewise falls under these rules.  Thus, when the writer tells us the denizens can’t accomplish magic legally until certified by the magical society or government, we accept that as reasonable.  Like a state requiring people of a certain age and training to test for a driver’s license, the strictures of the magical society seem reasoned and reasonable to us.  Thus, the author creates a situation of common knowledge and common sense by appealing to parallels in our own culture and society.  This is the ultimate means of creating any fictional society.

To build a fictional culture or society, the author starts with the known—their own culture and society and develops an entirely new one from that foundation.  This is true whether we are writing science fiction or fantasy. And, I know you have figured it out, the reflected worldview is most of the times considered or called fantasy.  My point is to expand fantasy beyond our usual constraints and to bring it into our ideas of mainstream literature.

Just as science fiction has been jumping the rails and entering the mainstream as modern fiction, I think fantasy or reflected worldview has much more to offer than simply as fantasy.  For example, how many have called Harry Potty, fantasy?  I’ve heard nary a peep in that direction.  How many have called the Sparkly Vampires fantasy?  Or how many have even called Dracula fantasy?  Fantasy seems to be marauding around as something else entirely while still being fantasy.  That’s one of the reasons I call it reflected worldview.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing – part x867, Writing a Novel, Changing World and Reflected History

16 August 2019, Writing – part x867, Writing a Novel, Changing World and Reflected History

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker          

Today:  Why don’t we go back to the basics and just writing a novel?  I can tell you what I do, and show you how I go about putting a novel together.  We can start with developing an idea then move into the details of the writing.

To start a novel, I picture an initial scene.  I may start from a protagonist or just launch into mental development of an initial scene.  I get the idea for an initial scene from all kinds of sources.  To help get the creative juices flowing, let’s look at the initial scene.

  1. Meeting between the protagonist and the antagonist or the protagonist’s helper
  2. Action point in the plot
  3. Buildup to an exciting scene
  4. Indirect introduction of the protagonist

The protagonist is the novel and the initial scene.  If you look at the four basic types of initial scenes, you see the reflection of the protagonist in each one.  If you noticed my examples yesterday, I expressed the scene idea, but none were completely independent of the protagonist.  Indeed, in most cases, I get an idea with a protagonist.  The protagonist is incomplete, but a sketch to begin with.  You can start with a protagonist, but in my opinion, as we see above, the protagonist is never completely independent from the initial scene.  As the ideas above imply, we can start with the characters, specifically the protagonist, antagonist or protagonist’s helper, and develop an initial scene.

Let’s look at a subject that is really ignored in the modern era.  I’m not certain how much this can help your current writing.  I would argue that theoretically, this subject can really help those who write historical and futuristic fiction.  It depends on how your write your historical and futuristic fiction.  There are two ways to write historical fiction—let’s look at this.

The first and most common way to write historical fiction is to write a novel that projects modern ideas and history as historical ideas and history.  In other words to present modern ideas and historical ideas as the same.  I think this is perhaps the most egregious and perverse means of presenting a false view of history.  The author is either completely ignorant of the past, is intentionally attempting to education people in a false view of history, or both.  The real historical world is very different both culturally and socially from our current world.  The true author attempts to convey this in historical writing.

The second and less common means of historical writing is to actually incorporate the past into a novel to convey the actual way people thought and acted in the past.  This approach actually goes back into time to give a complete view of the way the people thought and acted.  To this end, let’s look at how the world changed and how people thought in the past.  This is more of a historical look at the world for the purpose of understanding how the world worked in the past and how people thought and acted.  We’ll use historical information to see what concerned affected their lives. Here is a list of potential issues.  We’ll look at them in detail:

  1. Vocabulary
  2. Ideas
  3. Social construction
  4. Culture
  5. Politics
  6. History
  7. Language
  8. Common knowledge
  9. Common sense
  10. Reflected culture
  11. Reflected history
  12. Reflected society
  13. Truth
  14. Food
  15. Weapons
  16. Transportation
  17. Communication
  18. Writing

In writing, the author must define the real, reflected, and the created.  If you notice, this fits directly into the different worldviews or settings.  The real is completely real in setting or worldview.  The reflected is real however, it includes concepts that are not necessarily real but some or many humans agree with either historically, ideologically, religiously, or theoretically agree or know about them.  For example, myths, imaginary creatures like dragons, vampires, and fairies, gods and goddesses, and all.  Created means invented or extrapolated—basically science fiction.  The real is the known and the knowable.  The fiction trade space is the unknown and the unknowable.

The intersection of the reflected worldview is common knowledge, common sense, and history.  There is a great deal of history in the reflected worldview.  For example, I’m not certain Bram Stoker made any connection between his Dracula and Vlad the Impaler, but Vlad was a real person and within the novel Dracula is an implied connection.

The connections don’t have to be implied, they can be stated, used, and examined.  For example, in my novels, I select known historical places of Fae or ancient British magic and myth for my settings.  I actually accomplish intensive research on these types of places and areas—the reason is to provide both implied and real connections to my reflected worldview.  Authors who write in a real worldview do the same.

For example, if I were to set a novel in Paris, I would use all the real places around Paris for their historical and real world existence—in fact I have.  My yet unpublished novel Sister of Light is set in Paris in the late 1920s.  Why wouldn’t a real worldview writer use historical realities to populate his or her novels?  In fact, we call this type of writing historical fiction.  The reflective worldview author simply plays off the entire historical signature of the place and times.

What I’m writing about is myth, folklore, and rumors.  All of these are powerful motifs in reflective fiction.  They also are included in real or historical fiction.  The difference is that in real or historical fiction, myths, folklore, and rumors are either just creative elements or intentional red herrings.  In reflective fiction, myths, folklore, and rumors become setting elements, Chekov’s guns, and plot elements.  They aren’t red herrings that the writer then uses to turn into plot twists—that is real solutions to apparently spiritual or miraculous events.  For example, the logical crime initially portrayed as committed by a spiritual or a mythical creature.  In reflected fiction, it is always possible that in a plot twist from reality, that the crime was committed by a spiritual or mythical creature.

The connections an author provides are historical based on reality and historical based on human myth, folklore, and rumors.  The wise author fits all this into a reflected culture that makes sense to the readers.

This is what I was describing yesterday.  The culture of the reflected should explain directly or by implication why most people can’t detect or see it.  Here is where the author uses elements of the real world to project the reflective on his readers.  For example, when most people get up in the middle of the night, they notice every noise, every creak in the house.  Every sound and everything not seen is a chance to express the reflected.  The author doesn’t have to directly explain this, they author should leave this to the imagination of the reader.

In a simple example, the author might connect sounds in the night with fairies gathering.  The description of the sounds would be similar to those anyone might hear.  The final blow is to connect the sounds to events or to myth, folklore, and rumors.  This is a simple example, but the point isn’t to directly state the connections but to imply the connections.

One tool I use in my reflective writing is I don’t say why normal people can’t see the mythical, I directly state or imply why my reflective characters can see the mythical.  In some cases, I imply that anyone can see some of the characters I introduce, but that these beings chose who they appear to.  All of this is directly explained or implied by history.

The trick is to use what people already know (common knowledge) and already understand (common sense) and apply it in a fashion that is entertaining.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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