Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 991, Power of Secrets in Tension, Developing the Rising Action, Themes and Pathos

23 March 2017, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 991, Power of Secrets in Tension, Developing the Rising Action, Themes and Pathos

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja. I’m also working on my 29th novel, working title School.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 28: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 29: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

 

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Would you like to write a novel that a publisher will consider? Would you like to write a novel that is published? How about one that sells?

You can read the entire novel Aksinya Enchantment and the Daemon. I gave it to you in installments with comments on the writing. I don’t feel bad writing about spoilers. Aksinya is a novel filled with and all about secrets. It really isn’t a mystery, but it has some qualities of a mystery. It is a very complex novel, but very succinctly, it is about an aristocrat girl who calls a demon to protect her family from the Bolsheviks. The Bolsheviks murder her family anyway and now she is stuck with a demon who wants her to sin.

One of the great mysteries and secrets of the novel is the reality of the demon. No one else really sees him. He looks like a normal person to everyone other than Aksinya. Is the demon real or is he a figment of Aksinya’s imagination? Further, in the novel, we find everyone has a secret. Natalya has been abused. We learn that early. We didn’t know she was sexually used and tried to escape her abusive household through sex. Aksinya’s uncle and aunt have secrets. They want to be powerful in the nobility. Aksinya’s teacher has secrets—she is attracted to girls…and to Aksinya. The church has secrets. The Bishop has secrets. In Aksinya, there are secrets everywhere. All of these secrets are resolved or revealed in the novel. The big secret of the demon is the climax of the novel—it is also the telic flaw of Aksinya.

Novels should be filled with secrets—the more the better. I recommend you build novels on secrets. All mystery novels are. All detective novels are. Most spy novels are. Novels are all about secrets—you might as well think very carefully about this as you write.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 990, more Secrets in Tension, Developing the Rising Action, Themes and Pathos

22 March 2017, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 990, more Secrets in Tension, Developing the Rising Action, Themes and Pathos

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja. I’m also working on my 29th novel, working title School.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 28: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 29: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

 

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Would you like to write a novel that a publisher will consider? Would you like to write a novel that is published? How about one that sells?

To me, the idea of secrets and revelation of secrets flows in my writing. In many of my novels, I like to build a single or a set of secrets that are then revealed either at the climax or at some critical point in the novel. Here’s a big secret—the novel doesn’t have to be about the revelation of the secret. There can be secrets that just track through a novel. For example, in my Ghost Ship Chronicles, the great secret about Den is that his soul has changed. He has the soul of a long dead being trapped in his body, and his original soul is gone. Likewise, Natana in the novels has a great secret. She accidentally gained an ancient symbiotic computer chip that is attached to her brain. She can interact with this chip. These are secrets, but they are not the focus of the novels. The climaxes of the novels revolve around ideas related to the secrets, but the secrets themselves are not the main point of the novels.

Likewise, my enchantment novels are filled with secrets, but the secrets themselves are not the focus of the plot or the telic flaw. On the other hand, some of my novels are all about the secret. Most of these are mysteries. In my novel, Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon, Aksinya is a sorceress who called a demon. The fact she is a sorceress and that she called a deamon are great secrets. They are also related directly to the telic flaw and the plot of the novel. Aksinya wants to get rid of her demon. She must stop being a sorceress to do so. Ultimately, she is tried for being a sorceress in an ecclesiastical trial, and she is tried in a civil trial for the actions of the demon. These secrets cause the climax of the novel. Their revelation undoes Aksinya—the one because they believe she called a demon. The other because they don’t believe she called a demon. This is a wonderful and powerful paradox. This also relates to the power of secrets and the expected and unexpected climax in a novel. Aksinya is the perfect example of this.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 989, Secrets in Tension, Developing the Rising Action, Themes and Pathos

21 March 2017, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 989, Secrets in Tension, Developing the Rising Action, Themes and Pathos

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja. I’m also working on my 29th novel, working title School.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 28: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 29: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

 

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Would you like to write a novel that a publisher will consider? Would you like to write a novel that is published? How about one that sells?

So we are back to secrets. Deirdre has a secret. Sorcha has a secret. Luna has a secret. Others will have secrets. Everybody has a secret. This is true in real life. Most of our secrets are mundane, but most of us have secrets that, if they were revealed would  mortify us. Everybody has secrets. If you don’t have secrets, there may be something wrong with you. As I wrote, most of our secrets are mundane. Most people don’t care about your secrets, but some secrets are wonderful. Some secrets are terrible. Some secrets are horrific. A novel is the revelation of the protagonist’s character and specifically the protagonist’s telic flaw and the resolution of that telic flaw. Protagonists always have secrets. That is the point of a protagonist. Their secrets may remain a secret for a long time or a short time. My protagonist are not vomited onto the page—their secrets and their character remain a part of the revelation of the novel through the entire novel.

This is all part of the tension and release. Secrets are tension. Release is the revelation of the secrets. As you might note in this novel, School, Sorcha’s secret is a wonderful secret. Currently only Deirdre knows it. The fun thing about secrets is that you can let them out slowly. It’s like a balloon. One secret known by one person lets just a little of the secret (the air) out. Add another, and a little bit more gets out. Another and a little more. What if someone knows the secret, but doesn’t let on. What about the secret balloon. If enough of the secret remains, the author can let it out with a pin prick—bang. A big revelation—whoosh. A little revelation here, one there—it goes flat. My point is there are lots of ways to bring an end to a great secret. You can even keep it alive and full. Remember, the tension is the secret—the release is revealing the secret.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 988, Tension and Characters, Developing the Rising Action, Themes and Pathos

20 March 2017, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 988, Tension and Characters, Developing the Rising Action, Themes and Pathos

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja. I’m also working on my 29th novel, working title School.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 28: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 29: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

 

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Would you like to write a novel that a publisher will consider? Would you like to write a novel that is published? How about one that sells?

There is a very deliberate tension between Sorcha and Deirdre. Sorcha is the one with the secret, but Deirdre has a secret too. Sorcha is the one whose life will be very painful if Deirdre lets out her secret. The tension is very powerful. If Deirdre lets out Sorcha’s secret, that is the return of Sorcha’s full pathos. She returns to the gutter. She returns to hunger and having nothing. The power of this tension is that it is itself grounded in pathos. The reader, however, recognizes that Deirdre, for whatever faults she might have, will not give up Sorcha’s secret. This is the tension, but this tension is expected to last. We realize that Deirdre is honest and good. We have a feeling that her lack of self-control led to her being sent to Wycombe, but we know there is much much more to this banishment. It was a banishment that she desired. Something else is in play, and we aren’t sure what it is. The treat to Sorcha might not be Deirdre, but there is an entire rising action to build these ideas.

Who might betray Sorcha? That is the ultimate question the novel and plot begs. Luna knows more than she lets out. There is obviously some duplicity, and here is the opportunity to write about another major character. Luna is not the antagonist, but she is an obvious foil to Deirdre. Luna is there, not exclusively, but actually, to keep an eye, and a hand, if necessary, on Deirdre. She’s already accosted Deirdre physically. Luna Bolang is a person very similar to Deirdre. Luna’s mother’s mother is a goddess. The readers don’t know this yet, but it colors all of Luna’s actions. Luna has knowledge and takes actions that are strange and that directly affect Sorcha and Deirdre. If you contemplate that Luna’s family and Deirdre’s family are both involved with the MI structures to some degree, you might begin to imagine what Luna is about. If you say, why would a French teacher bother with two girls (or more for that matter), you might contemplate the idea that identifying and training the next generation of spies and operatives is a job for such a teacher. Where better to find your trainees than at an exclusive boarding school. What better person for such a job than a kid who snuck in for the opportunity of learning. Skills are what such a person would want to encourage and test. We will look for these skills and tests from Luna.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 987, still more on Characters, Developing the Rising Action, Themes and Pathos

19 March 2017, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 987, still more on Characters, Developing the Rising Action, Themes and Pathos

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja. I’m also working on my 29th novel, working title School.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 28: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 29: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

 

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Would you like to write a novel that a publisher will consider? Would you like to write a novel that is published? How about one that sells?

What about Sorcha? Sorcha is the focus but not the protagonist of my newest novel. She is the protagonist’s helper. Let’s look a little into her development and her history. As I wrote, I wanted a character who would produce strong pathos. In one of my blogs, I proposed a girl who was abandoned and snuck into a boarding school where she is now attending. To build this character, I needed one who had some trick that allowed her to hide in plain view. My simple solution to two problems: abandoned and hide in plain view, was to make the child the offspring of a human and an Unseelie fae. I’m not certain how I could elegantly touch this topic without this little slip of the supernatural. It could be done, but not without a host of other problems and issues. The simplest was to have Sorcha be abandoned because of who her parents were, and to have the ability to sneak into the school because of the power she gained from one parent. This mix of human and fae still keeps a powerful strain of the human in the novel.

I also chose to have Sorcha be a bit of a bad girl. She is so greatly overpowered by Deirdre that there is little bad for her girl. This aspect still comes out now and then. Sorcha was in British foster care and homes until she escaped. She beat up another girl(s) and was incarcerated in a juvenile prison. She used her abilities to escape prison and wandered to Wycombe Abbey, a school which is not too far away from the juvie prison. Sorcha isn’t a bad girl at all—she’s a child who hasn’t had anything. She is slowly clawing her way out of the mire. This is one of the powerful themes and features of the novel.

The excitement and entertainment about Sorcha is her natural pathos. She is pathos. The interjection of Deirdre into Sorcha’s life will cause her exceeding headaches and problems. What I would like to do, is try to keep the reader acutely aware of Sorcha’s pathetic condition while showing her slow movement out of it. Cap this with the recognition that she could return to her pathetic state at any moment. This is the power of pathos in the rising action.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 986, more on Characters, Developing the Rising Action, Themes and Pathos

18 March 2017, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 986, more on Characters, Developing the Rising Action, Themes and Pathos

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja. I’m also working on my 29th novel, working title School.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 28: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 29: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

 

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Would you like to write a novel that a publisher will consider? Would you like to write a novel that is published? How about one that sells?

The great secret in all of my novels is the supernatural (spiritual) undergirding that drives the plot and theme. Deirdre, the protagonist of my newest novel, School, is the child of a human, James Calloway, and the great goddess Ceridwen, Kathrin Calloway. In my other novels, Kathrin and James, to a lesser degree, play out roles as leaders and rulers. Both Kathrin and James are also members of the British MI structure. They are both members of the Organization, which used to be MI-19 during World War II and oversees covert operations and language espionage. The Organization is all about providing covert agents to the other MI organizations and the British government in general. Further, James is a share to MI-6 and works in the far east as an agent. Kathrin started in the Organization as an interrogation operative and eventually ran the language interrogation branch. Since the 1970s she has run the Stele branch of the Organization. Stele protects Britain from supernatural threats inside and outside of the nation. Kathrin came to lead this part of the organization.

In my other novels, Kathrin and James’ children are shown to work in the Organization and the MI structure. Kathrin and James had five children of their own and adopted Sveta and Klava. Sveta and Klava are the major focus of three of my Ancient Light novels. In other Enchantment novels, James and Kathrin’s children James, Stewart, and Flora all had roles. They weren’t large roles, but James and Stewart worked for the Organization. Stewart had taken Timothy Long’s position at the Foreign office. Flora worked at the Foreign office with her husband and their daughter Sorcha played a large role in two Enchantment novels. I haven’t written about Deirdre or Lachlann before. I expect to have Lachlann in this novel—perhaps as a guest.

This is part of the history of Deirdre. Her parents and family touch and intersect with the British MI system and secretly with the British supernatural. How much the children know about their mother, is another secret. I intended that they not know much at all. They all have ideas, but who could imagine a goddess in the modern world. This is the exact feel and experience I want to produce in my novels—everything is normal. There is no supernatural, but the supernatural is all around the characters and touching every aspect of the plot and theme. The point isn’t the supernatural at all, but rather the feeling that there is something else to be seen more than the plain and regular world around the reader. That’s the point, the reader experiences this world just like the characters do.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 985, Characters, Developing the Rising Action, Themes and Pathos

17 March 2017, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 985, Characters, Developing the Rising Action, Themes and Pathos

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja. I’m also working on my 29th novel, working title School.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 28: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 29: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

 

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Would you like to write a novel that a publisher will consider? Would you like to write a novel that is published? How about one that sells?

I’ve written a little already about developing characters. Let’s get into more details. I’ve pretty well determined the protagonist will be Deirdre. Her name is actually: Deirdre Effie (Oighrig) Calloway. She was born in May 1977. She is a reused character from for of my other novels—most specifically my later Ancient Light novels. Now, to her great secrets. Deirdre’s mother is Kathrin Calloway. Her father is James Calloway. Why this is important is James Calloway is a member of the Organization (used to be MI-19) and a share to MI-6. Kathrin is a member of the Organization and is also Ceridwen (the great goddess of the Gaelic people). This is one of my unique theme concepts that drive the Ancient Light novels. In general, in the Ancient Light novels the reader learns more and more about how displaced gods and goddesses are still protecting people and waging wars against the gods and goddesses who have not accepted the one true God. The concept idea behind Ancient Light is that gods and goddesses exist and were created by God to protect people and provide spiritual help until the coming of Christ. After the coming of Christ, the old gods and goddesses had the same choice as human beings—to accept and follow the true God and His Son, or to continue in opposition to God.

Likewise, using British mythos, there where three groups of angels in heaven: those who supported God, those who opposed God, and those who were neutral. The neutral angels were cast to earth to repent—they became the fae (fairies).

In School, the novel I’m writing, I have the intersection of a girl who is the child of a human and Ceridwen, and a girl who is the child of a human and an Unseelie fae. The power of this meeting and these novels is the unique flavor and incident of the spiritual in the guise of the supernatural. The great secret in all of my novels is this supernatural (spiritual) undergirding that drives the plot and theme. I’ll write more about Deirdre’s secrets.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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