Writing – part x807, Writing a Novel, Changing World and more Literacy

17 June 2019, Writing – part x807, Writing a Novel, Changing World and more Literacy

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker          

Today:  Why don’t we go back to the basics and just writing a novel?  I can tell you what I do, and show you how I go about putting a novel together.  We can start with developing an idea then move into the details of the writing.

To start a novel, I picture an initial scene.  I may start from a protagonist or just launch into mental development of an initial scene.  I get the idea for an initial scene from all kinds of sources.  To help get the creative juices flowing, let’s look at the initial scene.

  1. Meeting between the protagonist and the antagonist or the protagonist’s helper
  2. Action point in the plot
  3. Buildup to an exciting scene
  4. Indirect introduction of the protagonist

The protagonist is the novel and the initial scene.  If you look at the four basic types of initial scenes, you see the reflection of the protagonist in each one.  If you noticed my examples yesterday, I expressed the scene idea, but none were completely independent of the protagonist.  Indeed, in most cases, I get an idea with a protagonist.  The protagonist is incomplete, but a sketch to begin with.  You can start with a protagonist, but in my opinion, as we see above, the protagonist is never completely independent from the initial scene.  As the ideas above imply, we can start with the characters, specifically the protagonist, antagonist or protagonist’s helper, and develop an initial scene.

Let’s look at a subject that is really ignored in the modern era.  I’m not certain how much this can help your current writing.  I would argue that theoretically, this subject can really help those who write historical and futuristic fiction.  It depends on how your write your historical and futuristic fiction.  There are two ways to write historical fiction—let’s look at this.

The first and most common way to write historical fiction is to write a novel that projects modern ideas and history as historical ideas and history.  In other words to present modern ideas and historical ideas as the same.  I think this is perhaps the most egregious and perverse means of presenting a false view of history.  The author is either completely ignorant of the past, is intentionally attempting to education people in a false view of history, or both.  The real historical world is very different both culturally and socially from our current world.  The true author attempts to convey this in historical writing.

The second and less common means of historical writing is to actually incorporate the past into a novel to convey the actual way people thought and acted in the past.  This approach actually goes back into time to give a complete view of the way the people thought and acted.  To this end, let’s look at how the world changed and how people thought in the past.  This is more of a historical look at the world for the purpose of understanding how the world worked in the past and how people thought and acted.  We’ll use historical information to see what concerned affected their lives. Here is a list of potential issues.  We’ll look at them in detail:

  1. Vocabulary
  2. Ideas
  3. Social construction
  4. Culture
  5. Politics
  6. History
  7. Language
  8. Common knowledge
  9. Common sense
  10. Reflected culture
  11. Reflected history
  12. Reflected society
  13. Truth
  14. Food
  15. Weapons
  16. Transportation
  17. Communication
  18. Writing

Perhaps the greatest change in cultures comes with literacy.  Before literacy a people can’t understand forms or complex ideas.  Studies have been accomplished on preliterate cultures and their concept of the world are very interesting.  It might be easier to look back from a literate point of view.

As I began, literacy is a critical change in a culture and society.  With literacy people are able to put ideas on paper, but that’s not how it all started.  We know from proto writing that the first proto writing was for records.  Most all the records we have of proto writing are communications between a king or leader and priests.  We suspect that the invention of writing began to solve the problem of sending sacrifices from the king (leader, pharaoh, etc.) to the local or not so local temple.  Before proto writing, the king would send the lambs, pigs, or cattle and if they were pilfered, the priests would send back a message: hey we only got four pigs instead of five.  The king started sending a message with the sacrifices or another messenger: here’s your five pigs, sign for them.  The record keeping quickly moved out into the consumer and areas of commerce—they thought this was a great way to keep track of stuff.

Record keeping quickly moved from just lists of stuff to descriptions of stuff and actions.  All words needed some way of expression on paper (stone, mud, papyrus, and etc.), and so they did.  The Egyptians and the people of the Levant were likely the first two groups who invented writing in the Western world.  They used word sounds to express the words on paper, mud or, stone.  The Egyptians also used rebus as well as pictures in their hieroglyphics.  A rebus is a set of pictures representing a statement for example: “eye picture” + “heart picture” + U.  One of the meanings is, “I love you.”  This is how much of Egyptian writing works, but not all Egyptian writing.  It gets a lot more complex than this, but this is the beginning of writing in the West.

In the East, words were represented wholly as pictures, and in most cultures until the Koreans, did not turn into representations of letters and sounds.  The Koreans and then the Japanese borrowing from them created sounds for their letters.  Back to the West.

Literacy still had a longs way to go from the beginnings.  At first, almost all writing was record keeping.  The record keeping moved toward recording important aspects of ideas that should not be forgotten.  To the Egyptians this meant writing down the spells necessary for use in the afterlife.  They were considered so critical that they were recorded.  Still, at this time, human history or human ideas weren’t recorded.

The next thing that was written down was information or revelations from the gods.  In the case of the Hebrews, who happened to get their literacy from the Egyptians, they wrote the revelation of the God and that resulted in the Tanakh (Old Testament).  The Greeks wrote down their poetry and myths—their revelation from their gods.  The Egyptians were a little slower to catch on, but they eventually did.  Then, the Greeks had this very neat idea—what if we wrote down what happened to our peoples?  The Spartans and the Athenians wanted to record their exploits especially in war.  The first historical documents came out of this idea.  This was also the invention of the historical-legal method.  A method for proving non-repeatable events.  This was a very important invention and perhaps the most important invention after literacy.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing – part x806, Writing a Novel, Changing World and Literacy

16 June 2019, Writing – part x806, Writing a Novel, Changing World and Literacy

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker          

Today:  Why don’t we go back to the basics and just writing a novel?  I can tell you what I do, and show you how I go about putting a novel together.  We can start with developing an idea then move into the details of the writing.

To start a novel, I picture an initial scene.  I may start from a protagonist or just launch into mental development of an initial scene.  I get the idea for an initial scene from all kinds of sources.  To help get the creative juices flowing, let’s look at the initial scene.

  1. Meeting between the protagonist and the antagonist or the protagonist’s helper
  2. Action point in the plot
  3. Buildup to an exciting scene
  4. Indirect introduction of the protagonist

The protagonist is the novel and the initial scene.  If you look at the four basic types of initial scenes, you see the reflection of the protagonist in each one.  If you noticed my examples yesterday, I expressed the scene idea, but none were completely independent of the protagonist.  Indeed, in most cases, I get an idea with a protagonist.  The protagonist is incomplete, but a sketch to begin with.  You can start with a protagonist, but in my opinion, as we see above, the protagonist is never completely independent from the initial scene.  As the ideas above imply, we can start with the characters, specifically the protagonist, antagonist or protagonist’s helper, and develop an initial scene.

Let’s look at a subject that is really ignored in the modern era.  I’m not certain how much this can help your current writing.  I would argue that theoretically, this subject can really help those who write historical and futuristic fiction.  It depends on how your write your historical and futuristic fiction.  There are two ways to write historical fiction—let’s look at this.

The first and most common way to write historical fiction is to write a novel that projects modern ideas and history as historical ideas and history.  In other words to present modern ideas and historical ideas as the same.  I think this is perhaps the most egregious and perverse means of presenting a false view of history.  The author is either completely ignorant of the past, is intentionally attempting to education people in a false view of history, or both.  The real historical world is very different both culturally and socially from our current world.  The true author attempts to convey this in historical writing.

The second and less common means of historical writing is to actually incorporate the past into a novel to convey the actual way people thought and acted in the past.  This approach actually goes back into time to give a complete view of the way the people thought and acted.  To this end, let’s look at how the world changed and how people thought in the past.  This is more of a historical look at the world for the purpose of understanding how the world worked in the past and how people thought and acted.  We’ll use historical information to see what concerned affected their lives. Here is a list of potential issues.  We’ll look at them in detail:

  1. Vocabulary
  2. Ideas
  3. Social construction
  4. Culture
  5. Politics
  6. History
  7. Language
  8. Common knowledge
  9. Common sense
  10. Reflected culture
  11. Reflected history
  12. Reflected society
  13. Truth
  14. Food
  15. Weapons
  16. Transportation
  17. Communication
  18. Writing

Perhaps the greatest change in cultures comes with literacy.  Before literacy a people can’t understand forms or complex ideas.  Studies have been accomplished on preliterate cultures and their concepts of the world are very interesting.  It might be easier to look back from a literate point of view.

The literate person, when a noun with a form is mentioned, imagines the word and not the picture of the word.  In a context, the literate person might engage their imagination to mentally see the picture being drawn by the sentence or paragraph, but if I say the word “chair,” a literate person will see the word in their mind.  Chair is a noun based on a form.  If you tried to imagine a chair as a type in your mind, what would you see?  You could imagine a million types of chairs, but as a form, a chair is something made by a person to sit upon that usually has four legs a bottom and a back.  The literate person sees the word “chair” in their mind and this provides the form.  Not so for the preliterate person.

A preliterate sees a specific chair in their mind.  It might be the grandmother’s chair or the chief’s chair, but because a preliterate can’t see a word, they can’t imagine a form.  Their conception of a chair must be a picture and not an archetype.  The same is true of every word in their vocabulary.  This becomes especially important for complex nouns and verbs especially those without any picture that can be tied to them.

I can imagine “run” or “walk.”  These verbs can be easily pictured.  What about the verb “love?”  How do you picture “love” in the context of a human action?  You can’t.  You can picture “hug,” “kiss,” and “sex,” but “love” is not a singular or easy action to understand.  Especially in the context of modern English.  Love is a word that must be viewed from a form or archetype that is the word “l-o-v-e.”

As literate people, these ideas are very difficult for us to comprehend.  We just use language and think about very complex ideas without giving it much real thought.  We don’t understand or realize that preliterate people and nonliterate individuals can’t understand the ideas we take for granted.  They have no way of understanding them.  Think about “love” again.  If I can’t picture the concept as an action in my mind, I can’t comprehend it.  How does a preliterate or a nonliterate understand love?  The answer is, they can’t.  Love is just one of those ideas in human understanding that requires an archetype.  Does this mean the preliterate or nonliterate can’t love?  The short answer is yes, they can’t.  A child who is preliterate can’t begin to understand love.  They can kiss and show affection, but love is such a complex concept there is absolutely no way they can begin to understand it.  They might be able to say the actual word, but it has no meaning without some context.  Plus, the complexity of the idea of love in English culture is so complex that even for the literate, love is a difficult idea to fully comprehend.

I wrote before about the evolution of the word “love” in human thinking.  It took a long time to get to the point where we understand and apply love.  In English, the word is so varied to be almost without concreteness.  I love my wife, my dog, my children, my mother, my father, my house, my food, my pizza, my books, my life, my job, and all of these loves are different in action, quality, and criticality.

The idea “love” is cultural and doesn’t mean the same thing in other cultures and especially in earlier cultures.  The same is true of many other complex ideas represented by words.  As I began, literacy is a critical change in a culture and society.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing – part x805, Writing a Novel, Changing World and Ideas

15 June 2019, Writing – part x805, Writing a Novel, Changing World and Ideas

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker          

Today:  Why don’t we go back to the basics and just writing a novel?  I can tell you what I do, and show you how I go about putting a novel together.  We can start with developing an idea then move into the details of the writing.

To start a novel, I picture an initial scene.  I may start from a protagonist or just launch into mental development of an initial scene.  I get the idea for an initial scene from all kinds of sources.  To help get the creative juices flowing, let’s look at the initial scene.

  1. Meeting between the protagonist and the antagonist or the protagonist’s helper
  2. Action point in the plot
  3. Buildup to an exciting scene
  4. Indirect introduction of the protagonist

The protagonist is the novel and the initial scene.  If you look at the four basic types of initial scenes, you see the reflection of the protagonist in each one.  If you noticed my examples yesterday, I expressed the scene idea, but none were completely independent of the protagonist.  Indeed, in most cases, I get an idea with a protagonist.  The protagonist is incomplete, but a sketch to begin with.  You can start with a protagonist, but in my opinion, as we see above, the protagonist is never completely independent from the initial scene.  As the ideas above imply, we can start with the characters, specifically the protagonist, antagonist or protagonist’s helper, and develop an initial scene.

Let’s look at a subject that is really ignored in the modern era.  I’m not certain how much this can help your current writing.  I would argue that theoretically, this subject can really help those who write historical and futuristic fiction.  It depends on how your write your historical and futuristic fiction.  There are two ways to write historical fiction—let’s look at this.

The first and most common way to write historical fiction is to write a novel that projects modern ideas and history as historical ideas and history.  In other words to present modern ideas and historical ideas as the same.  I think this is perhaps the most egregious and perverse means of presenting a false view of history.  The author is either completely ignorant of the past, is intentionally attempting to education people in a false view of history, or both.  The real historical world is very different both culturally and socially from our current world.  The true author attempts to convey this in historical writing.

The second and less common means of historical writing is to actually incorporate the past into a novel to convey the actual way people thought and acted in the past.  This approach actually goes back into time to give a complete view of the way the people thought and acted.  To this end, let’s look at how the world changed and how people thought in the past.  This is more of a historical look at the world for the purpose of understanding how the world worked in the past and how people thought and acted.  We’ll use historical information to see what concerned affected their lives. Here is a list of potential issues.  We’ll look at them in detail:

  1. Vocabulary
  2. Ideas
  3. Social construction
  4. Culture
  5. Politics
  6. History
  7. Language
  8. Common knowledge
  9. Common sense
  10. Reflected culture
  11. Reflected history
  12. Reflected society
  13. Truth
  14. Food
  15. Weapons
  16. Transportation
  17. Communication
  18. Writing

Ideas in human cultures and societies have changed remarkably through human history.  In fact, if you didn’t know, humans in different cultures do not think about the world in similar ways.  If you don’t know this, you haven’t traveled enough.  A common modern idea is that people are people no matter where they live or come from, but this is completely untrue.  I’m not sure how to get you to understand this or how to represent this in an understandable manner.  Perhaps it is best for you to observe these cultures directly.  If you are perceptive, you can see these differences in your own society.  The obvious should be evident to you.

In your own culture, you will note not just groups but many individuals who based on their origins and upbringing eat different diets, celebrate different holidays, or the same holidays in different ways, have different accents, speak using a different vocabulary, have different goals or desires in their families, have different means of expressing love or friendship and all.  If people are this different on the outside, how different are their actual viewpoints and ways of thinking?

Oriental cultures do not see the world or experience the world in the same way we do.  In those cultures, you may not notice the enormous differences unless you carefully observe them.  They won’t tell you.  That is one of the characteristics of an oriental culture.  They intentionally downplay the differences to get along.  Each oriental culture is different in this regard, but also similar.  It is a question of degree and expression, but that isn’t the only difference.  Simple physical touching is considered aggressive and unacceptable in most oriental cultures.  There is much more to this.

My point is simply this.  If we are observant, we will see how differently people think about common subjects like food, drink, ethics, morals, interaction, and holidays.  This should indicate to the cogent person that the differences go much further than these outside observations.  Ideas in the human condition are similar and much greater.  If you asked yourself, how does this person think about love, family, marriage, work, entertainment, friendship, and all?  These ideas vary greatly between people from a similar culture.  They may and usually vary much greater from culture to culture.  However, most cultures have somewhat similar views on these issues.  Different cultures don’t have similar ideas, and that’s the point.

We need to understand something about the cultures we intend to write about.  This means generationally, socially, culturally, historically, and all.  For example, I’ve represented indigenous American people in my novels.  I have studied historically and specifically primary source documents to understand the view of these people in my novels.  I am not writing about their problems or complaints necessarily, but I want to represent their character and views in my writing.  If I have written well what I studied, I would expect a person from that culture to like and accept my cultural drawing.  This is true of all the cultures and people I express in my writing.  I approach each as an individual with individual thoughts and ideas developed from their culture and society.  In this way, I don’t produce stereotypes, but I present characters who are uniquely and obviously representative of their people and cultures.  As I noted ideas change with time—let’s look at some.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing – part x804, Writing a Novel, Changing World, Vocabulary Conclusions

14 June 2019, Writing – part x804, Writing a Novel, Changing World, Vocabulary Conclusions

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker           

Today:  Why don’t we go back to the basics and just writing a novel?  I can tell you what I do, and show you how I go about putting a novel together.  We can start with developing an idea then move into the details of the writing.

To start a novel, I picture an initial scene.  I may start from a protagonist or just launch into mental development of an initial scene.  I get the idea for an initial scene from all kinds of sources.  To help get the creative juices flowing, let’s look at the initial scene.

  1. Meeting between the protagonist and the antagonist or the protagonist’s helper
  2. Action point in the plot
  3. Buildup to an exciting scene
  4. Indirect introduction of the protagonist

The protagonist is the novel and the initial scene.  If you look at the four basic types of initial scenes, you see the reflection of the protagonist in each one.  If you noticed my examples yesterday, I expressed the scene idea, but none were completely independent of the protagonist.  Indeed, in most cases, I get an idea with a protagonist.  The protagonist is incomplete, but a sketch to begin with.  You can start with a protagonist, but in my opinion, as we see above, the protagonist is never completely independent from the initial scene.  As the ideas above imply, we can start with the characters, specifically the protagonist, antagonist or protagonist’s helper, and develop an initial scene.

Let’s look at a subject that is really ignored in the modern era.  I’m not certain how much this can help your current writing.  I would argue that theoretically, this subject can really help those who write historical and futuristic fiction.  It depends on how your write your historical and futuristic fiction.  There are two ways to write historical fiction—let’s look at this.

The first and most common way to write historical fiction is to write a novel that projects modern ideas and history as historical ideas and history.  In other words to present modern ideas and historical ideas as the same.  I think this is perhaps the most egregious and perverse means of presenting a false view of history.  The author is either completely ignorant of the past, is intentionally attempting to education people in a false view of history, or both.  The real historical world is very different both culturally and socially from our current world.  The true author attempts to convey this in historical writing.

The second and less common means of historical writing is to actually incorporate the past into a novel to convey the actual way people thought and acted in the past.  This approach actually goes back into time to give a complete view of the way the people thought and acted.  To this end, let’s look at how the world changed and how people thought in the past.  This is more of a historical look at the world for the purpose of understanding how the world worked in the past and how people thought and acted.  We’ll use historical information to see what concerned affected their lives. Here is a list of potential issues.  We’ll look at them in detail:

  1. Vocabulary
  2. Ideas
  3. Social construction
  4. Culture
  5. Politics
  6. History
  7. Language
  8. Common knowledge
  9. Common sense
  10. Reflected culture
  11. Reflected history
  12. Reflected society
  13. Truth
  14. Food
  15. Weapons
  16. Transportation
  17. Communication
  18. Writing

Suffice to say, the world has changed radically since the advent of human beings in it.  Human culture has changed radically from beginnings to civilization to the ages of humankind.  Vocabulary and the meanings of terms is an indicator of this change.

The author needs to be aware of these changes.  In the past, education was classically based.  The average person was taught about these magnificent changes in human progression.  They might not have understood the details of sacrifice or the unique changes in the understanding of love and human intimacy, but they knew these ideas had changed, and enough information in their Greek and Latin studies were available to them to discover the power of these changes.

Today, unless you have been graced with a classically based education, you will not have the tools available to fully understand, so we must strive to gain that understanding.  I’ll advise you on this topic just as I have advised you on the topic of writing in general.  To be a great writer, you must become a great reader.

Great reading doesn’t mean the popular literature of the day.  Great reading doesn’t exclude the popular literature of the day—you need to understand the market and the types of writing that sells.  Great reading must begin with classics, and classics is not the unknown, unread, and unpopular claptrap your non-classical education told you was what you needed to know.  The ideas of a progressive education are like the dogmatic Bible thumpers who tell you to read the Bible, but neglect the other books from the same time period that add to and support the Bible.  You can’t have a great grasp of the Bible if you don’t understand the Mishna, Talmud, Septuagint, the Apocrypha (both OT and NT), and the numerous period based books that support the veracity of them all.  Be willing to find and read the hidden books of fiction literature.

In the past I’ve given you a list of great novels to read.  I won’t do that here.  You can go look back at my blogs.  Read classical literature including history and fiction.  Find the classics they don’t want you to read anymore.  You will know they are classics by the time they were written, the locality of the author to the setting and time, and the quality of the entertainment in the writing.  Ultimately, great fiction is great because it is entertaining.  And I’ll add this, entertaining means it applies intimately to the human condition.

Most of the action movies of today may have some entertainment factor, but ultimately, they are about gods and messiahs and not about people.  The current crop of super heroes are just gods and messiahs, entertaining for a moment, but ultimately bored gods acting as if they are human.  When I write that true entertainment applies intimately to the human condition I mean like Pride and Prejudice.  Here is a novel about love, misunderstanding, and humans interacting.  This is the magic of literature and fiction.  

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing – part x803, Writing a Novel, Changing World, Love and Vocabulary

13 June 2019, Writing – part x803, Writing a Novel, Changing World, Love and Vocabulary

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker          

Today:  Why don’t we go back to the basics and just writing a novel?  I can tell you what I do, and show you how I go about putting a novel together.  We can start with developing an idea then move into the details of the writing.

To start a novel, I picture an initial scene.  I may start from a protagonist or just launch into mental development of an initial scene.  I get the idea for an initial scene from all kinds of sources.  To help get the creative juices flowing, let’s look at the initial scene.

  1. Meeting between the protagonist and the antagonist or the protagonist’s helper
  2. Action point in the plot
  3. Buildup to an exciting scene
  4. Indirect introduction of the protagonist

The protagonist is the novel and the initial scene.  If you look at the four basic types of initial scenes, you see the reflection of the protagonist in each one.  If you noticed my examples yesterday, I expressed the scene idea, but none were completely independent of the protagonist.  Indeed, in most cases, I get an idea with a protagonist.  The protagonist is incomplete, but a sketch to begin with.  You can start with a protagonist, but in my opinion, as we see above, the protagonist is never completely independent from the initial scene.  As the ideas above imply, we can start with the characters, specifically the protagonist, antagonist or protagonist’s helper, and develop an initial scene.

Let’s look at a subject that is really ignored in the modern era.  I’m not certain how much this can help your current writing.  I would argue that theoretically, this subject can really help those who write historical and futuristic fiction.  It depends on how your write your historical and futuristic fiction.  There are two ways to write historical fiction—let’s look at this.

The first and most common way to write historical fiction is to write a novel that projects modern ideas and history as historical ideas and history.  In other words to present modern ideas and historical ideas as the same.  I think this is perhaps the most egregious and perverse means of presenting a false view of history.  The author is either completely ignorant of the past, is intentionally attempting to education people in a false view of history, or both.  The real historical world is very different both culturally and socially from our current world.  The true author attempts to convey this in historical writing.

The second and less common means of historical writing is to actually incorporate the past into a novel to convey the actual way people thought and acted in the past.  This approach actually goes back into time to give a complete view of the way the people thought and acted.  To this end, let’s look at how the world changed and how people thought in the past.  This is more of a historical look at the world for the purpose of understanding how the world worked in the past and how people thought and acted.  We’ll use historical information to see what concerned affected their lives. Here is a list of potential issues.  We’ll look at them in detail:

  1. Vocabulary
  2. Ideas
  3. Social construction
  4. Culture
  5. Politics
  6. History
  7. Language
  8. Common knowledge
  9. Common sense
  10. Reflected culture
  11. Reflected history
  12. Reflected society
  13. Truth
  14. Food
  15. Weapons
  16. Transportation
  17. Communication
  18. Writing

The first subject I want to look at is vocabulary.  Vocabulary has changed enormously in every language, but there is much more to this subject than simply using different words for things.  The first is that in any culture, words are loaded with significance.  This is especially true with time and changes in culture and society.

If you are writing historically accurate novels then the concepts of changing vocabulary are very important to you.  If you are trying to write in a way that communicates powerfully and historically in modern or futuristic fiction, the concepts of changing vocabulary are critical to you.  If you didn’t notice, changing vocabulary is directly connected with changing ideas in history.  We don’t use the same vocabulary, the word meanings have changed with time, and the very ideas represented by the words have changed significantly.  This is a very important thing to recognize because there are two ways to write historical fiction and, indeed, all fiction.

The first way to write fiction is to write from a current cultural framework.  In this modern cultural framework, only modern ideas have any validity.  All cultures are measured by some type of cultural ruler.  In a current cultural framework, the “cultural ruler” is the very limited view of the writer with every cultural bias exposed.  Taken to an extreme, compared to a current cultural framework, every culture in the past is unworthy, immoral, unjust and abusive.  Or, if the writer is absolutely ignorant of historical cultures, then the historical culture looks just like the world today.  The characters might walk around in old-fashioned clothing in historical settings, but they act, speak, and think just like people today.  So, if you write from a current cultural framework, you aren’t writing about the real world at all.  You simply have cultural blinders on and can’t express the world of the past at all.  Either you white wash everything without any understanding of the past, or you couch everything in negative terms and invalidate every positive aspect of the society you are writing about.  I think using a current cultural framework is a terrible way to write.  In fact, the current cultural framework results in poor historical, modern, and science fiction writing.

When you write using a current cultural framework (usually your cultural framework), you insert your impression of your culture over the novel.  In a historical novel this is exactly what you don’t want to do.  In a modern novel, don’t you want to reflect the culture of the novel?  In many cases, that culture is not yours at all.  In a science fiction novel, you are writing about a culture developed from some current culture, but it should not be your impression of the current culture.

To write using the framework of a historical culture, you need to know that culture the best you can.  I also helps if you can sympathize with that culture.  You don’t have to agree with it, but if you hate it or even dislike it, how can you write effectively about it.

I have written multiple historically based novels.  Some of these are about slave based cultures.  I don’t agree with slavery of any type, but to write these novels, I read every historical primary and secondary source I could get.  I tried to think and feel like the people in the cultures I was writing about.  At the same time, I was able to bring out the problems in their cultures.  The point is to produce a fictional work that relates the times of the setting as closely as possible to the historical time.  This makes your work as close as possible to the history of the times and not just modern people walking around in old fashioned clothing.

I write science fiction and modern fiction as well.  When I write it, I try to understand the culture of the setting in the same way as I do for historical novels.  This is easier than writing historical fiction, but it still requires research and work.  For science fiction, I develop a new culture based on a modern cultural framework.  Like modern fiction, I research the basic culture I’m starting with and extrapolate the culture of the novel.

If you look at my science fiction, they start with the Anglo-Saxon culture as the basis for the design.  I chose this culture for historical reasons, and to reflect a feudal type culture in the far future.  The point is to make our writing as real and historically accurate as possible.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing – part x802, Writing a Novel, Changing World, more Love

12 June 2019, Writing – part x802, Writing a Novel, Changing World, more Love

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker          

Today:  Why don’t we go back to the basics and just writing a novel?  I can tell you what I do, and show you how I go about putting a novel together.  We can start with developing an idea then move into the details of the writing.

To start a novel, I picture an initial scene.  I may start from a protagonist or just launch into mental development of an initial scene.  I get the idea for an initial scene from all kinds of sources.  To help get the creative juices flowing, let’s look at the initial scene.

  1. Meeting between the protagonist and the antagonist or the protagonist’s helper
  2. Action point in the plot
  3. Buildup to an exciting scene
  4. Indirect introduction of the protagonist

The protagonist is the novel and the initial scene.  If you look at the four basic types of initial scenes, you see the reflection of the protagonist in each one.  If you noticed my examples yesterday, I expressed the scene idea, but none were completely independent of the protagonist.  Indeed, in most cases, I get an idea with a protagonist.  The protagonist is incomplete, but a sketch to begin with.  You can start with a protagonist, but in my opinion, as we see above, the protagonist is never completely independent from the initial scene.  As the ideas above imply, we can start with the characters, specifically the protagonist, antagonist or protagonist’s helper, and develop an initial scene.

Let’s look at a subject that is really ignored in the modern era.  I’m not certain how much this can help your current writing.  I would argue that theoretically, this subject can really help those who write historical and futuristic fiction.  It depends on how your write your historical and futuristic fiction.  There are two ways to write historical fiction—let’s look at this.

The first and most common way to write historical fiction is to write a novel that projects modern ideas and history as historical ideas and history.  In other words to present modern ideas and historical ideas as the same.  I think this is perhaps the most egregious and perverse means of presenting a false view of history.  The author is either completely ignorant of the past, is intentionally attempting to education people in a false view of history, or both.  The real historical world is very different both culturally and socially from our current world.  The true author attempts to convey this in historical writing.

The second and less common means of historical writing is to actually incorporate the past into a novel to convey the actual way people thought and acted in the past.  This approach actually goes back into time to give a complete view of the way the people thought and acted.  To this end, let’s look at how the world changed and how people thought in the past.  This is more of a historical look at the world for the purpose of understanding how the world worked in the past and how people thought and acted.  We’ll use historical information to see what concerned affected their lives. Here is a list of potential issues.  We’ll look at them in detail:

  1. Vocabulary
  2. Ideas
  3. Social construction
  4. Culture
  5. Politics
  6. History
  7. Language
  8. Common knowledge
  9. Common sense
  10. Reflected culture
  11. Reflected history
  12. Reflected society
  13. Truth
  14. Food
  15. Weapons
  16. Transportation
  17. Communication
  18. Writing

The first subject I want to look at is vocabulary.  Vocabulary has changed enormously in every language, but there is much more to this subject than simply using different words for things.  The first is that in any culture, words are loaded with significance.  This is especially true with time and changes in culture and society.

In English culture, we have love moving from a concept of warriors and respect to the idea of men and women and respect.  It was a concept that brought these diverse groups into a powerful alignment—a new social alignment.  The result of this change is that the word and concept “love” has become more euphemistic than ever.  This is true of much of our society and our words.

It is not unusual that societies move from more concrete to less concrete in terms of words and vocabulary.  This should seem odd to us.  Younger societies have fewer words and yet generally more concrete word usage.  However this isn’t always so.  Our society has over one million words, yet we are significantly a euphemistically based language.  What is concrete compared to euphemistic?

When I write that some languages are more concrete I mean that some languages (and societies) expect the words used to mean exactly what they say.  Although we see common figurative use of the language, but some cultures’ words and expressions mean exactly what they say, and this is especially true of earlier or younger languages and cultures.  An example is difficult to easily come up with, but try this.  In English, I might say, “How do you do?”  This is a euphemistic phrase that is a pleasant greeting.  It is also a euphemism that has little deep import—it’s nearly thoughtlessly used in English.  This phrase has morphed over time to many similar phrases.  All societies have similar types of greetings and exchanges.  Greek unusually has a similar greeting charis (grace).  The import of this simple greeting is so great that Christianity took it as a topic of theology.  I don’t want to give too much to a simple word of greeting, but the importance of the greeting “charis” or grace in ancient Greek appears to have significantly more significance than “How do you do?” in English.  The Greeks seemed to intend this word to mean more than just a thoughtlessly used word of greeting.

Another example from the Greeks.  In English, we have a general word “worship.”  “Worship” means many things.  It is a euphemistic word that expresses many rituals or concepts, but we understand it in this sense.  The Greeks don’t have a similar word.  The Greek words usually translated by worship mean to prostrate oneself (proskuneo), to jump for joy (agalliao), to bend (bow) (kampto), and there are many more.  The Greeks didn’t have a simple euphemistic term that included all means of worship, they needed to use a descriptive word that concretely illustrated the specific action of worship.  You see this over and over in ancient Greek…and the opposite over and over in English.

There are ancient languages and cultures that started very euphemistically and remain this way.  Off hand, these are Japanese (perhaps the most euphemistic) and Hebrew.  Both of these languages are much more euphemistic than English.

Another indicator of euphemism is the need to use context to understand the meaning of words.  English is pretty bad, but both Hebrew and Japanese significantly require context to understand proper meaning.  For example, the word koi in Japanese can mean love or a carp.  You must have the context.  In Hebrew, the word a (alph) means one, a, person, ox, comrade, partner, and some other meanings.  The poetry of the Japanese and the Hebrews use this ambiguity to great effect.  English does too.  Greek, on the other hand, is well known for its very unembellished poetry and expression.  Where English might express, “It was a dark and stormy night,” the Greeks would surely write, “The rain was falling, the wind was blowing, and it was night.”

What does this have to do with vocabulary?

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing – part x801, Writing a Novel, Changing World, Love

11 June 2019, Writing – part x801, Writing a Novel, Changing World, Love

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker          

Today:  Why don’t we go back to the basics and just writing a novel?  I can tell you what I do, and show you how I go about putting a novel together.  We can start with developing an idea then move into the details of the writing.

To start a novel, I picture an initial scene.  I may start from a protagonist or just launch into mental development of an initial scene.  I get the idea for an initial scene from all kinds of sources.  To help get the creative juices flowing, let’s look at the initial scene.

  1. Meeting between the protagonist and the antagonist or the protagonist’s helper
  2. Action point in the plot
  3. Buildup to an exciting scene
  4. Indirect introduction of the protagonist

The protagonist is the novel and the initial scene.  If you look at the four basic types of initial scenes, you see the reflection of the protagonist in each one.  If you noticed my examples yesterday, I expressed the scene idea, but none were completely independent of the protagonist.  Indeed, in most cases, I get an idea with a protagonist.  The protagonist is incomplete, but a sketch to begin with.  You can start with a protagonist, but in my opinion, as we see above, the protagonist is never completely independent from the initial scene.  As the ideas above imply, we can start with the characters, specifically the protagonist, antagonist or protagonist’s helper, and develop an initial scene.

Let’s look at a subject that is really ignored in the modern era.  I’m not certain how much this can help your current writing.  I would argue that theoretically, this subject can really help those who write historical and futuristic fiction.  It depends on how your write your historical and futuristic fiction.  There are two ways to write historical fiction—let’s look at this.

The first and most common way to write historical fiction is to write a novel that projects modern ideas and history as historical ideas and history.  In other words to present modern ideas and historical ideas as the same.  I think this is perhaps the most egregious and perverse means of presenting a false view of history.  The author is either completely ignorant of the past, is intentionally attempting to education people in a false view of history, or both.  The real historical world is very different both culturally and socially from our current world.  The true author attempts to convey this in historical writing.

The second and less common means of historical writing is to actually incorporate the past into a novel to convey the actual way people thought and acted in the past.  This approach actually goes back into time to give a complete view of the way the people thought and acted.  To this end, let’s look at how the world changed and how people thought in the past.  This is more of a historical look at the world for the purpose of understanding how the world worked in the past and how people thought and acted.  We’ll use historical information to see what concerned affected their lives. Here is a list of potential issues.  We’ll look at them in detail:

  1. Vocabulary
  2. Ideas
  3. Social construction
  4. Culture
  5. Politics
  6. History
  7. Language
  8. Common knowledge
  9. Common sense
  10. Reflected culture
  11. Reflected history
  12. Reflected society
  13. Truth
  14. Food
  15. Weapons
  16. Transportation
  17. Communication
  18. Writing

The first subject I want to look at is vocabulary.  Vocabulary has changed enormously in every language, but there is much more to this subject than simply using different words for things.  The first is that in any culture, words are loaded with significance.  This is especially true with time and changes in culture and society.

We transitioned from sacrifice to love.  I noted that love as a verb when applied by our ancestors in English was much different from the word love we toss around in modern times.  The Anglo-Saxons and the Norman French were not so far apart in their thoughts about love—the problem is that their love is definitely not our love.

The Anglo-Saxons and the Norman French both saw the shield brother concept as the highest form of love.  When Christianity hit them, their views changed pretty radically.  The idea that a deity could love and protect like a shield brother was a new idea.  This idea of love between the man and God was not just new, it was revolutionizing.  Further, the idea that God could love women and slaves in the same way He loved a shield brother rocked these societies.  Before Christianity, the Anglo-Saxons and the Norman French focused their society on men and especially warriors.  Women had places of authority, but because they could not accept the same level of authority as men as shield brothers, they could not and were not considered equal or even human.  Christianity changed all that.

The idea that God could love a man, woman, child, or slave and the person could reflect that love back to the deity transformed the idea of human worth in these societies.  I’ll also point out that Christianity had this effect on ever society it infiltrated.  If God could love a woman, then a man could love a woman.  In ancient Greek, a man could only love a woman in pathos (fated lust, sex), eros (romantically), and pragma (acceptance through time).  Christianity said that a man or a woman could agape (love of the gods) both God and each other.  It also specified that men and women were equals and could interact as shield brothers had that is phileo (brotherly love).  These ideas likely took time to sink in and to change these societies, but they quickly, within one to less than three generations.  We see the effects historically in Anglo-Saxon and Norman French Epics.

Almost overnight, the world of the shield brothers became a society where courtly love became the norm.  Courtly love is a significant concept that radically transformed all the cultures of medieval Europe.  The Anglo-Saxons and the Norman French had already accepted these new ideas introduced through Christianity when in 1066, William the Bastard united these two cultures by defeating Edward at the Battle of Hastings.  This caused more problems than you can imagine, but the cultures were both significantly similar and significantly different.  They were so similar, that although the Norman French tried to keep their language, society, and culture separate from the Anglo-Saxons, it was impossible.  Intermarriage, interrelationships, and oddly integration of the languages occurred quickly, so quickly that by about 1195, the societies were significantly integrated and yet the Norman French were the bad guys and they never intended that.  Look at Ivanhoe as an example of how the turning point of these cultures became the English culture we know.

Back to love.  Love in this culture was the expression of courtly love.  Courtly love was supposed to be the Godly love between a man and a woman like the love of God.  We know this only went so far because for the human man and woman, courtly love also integrated into romance, marriage, and eventually sex.  Courtly love gave women great power in relationships—power that women had never had.  They were a figure of general desire the equal of the respect that warriors possessed during the period of Anglo-Saxon and Norman French shield brothers.  Their respect was based on their beauty, skills as a woman, position, and respectability.  Men competed for this courtly love and women bestowed their love on men who met or exceeded their expectations especially on the battlefield.

So, in English culture, we have love moving from a concept of warriors and respect to the idea of men and women and respect.  It was a concept that brought these diverse groups into a powerful alignment—a new social alignment.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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