Writing – part x934, Writing a Novel, Space Tactics

22 October 2019, Writing – part x934, Writing a Novel, Space Tactics

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker          

Today:  Why don’t we go back to the basics and just writing a novel?  I can tell you what I do, and show you how I go about putting a novel together.  We can start with developing an idea then move into the details of the writing.

To start a novel, I picture an initial scene.  I may start from a protagonist or just launch into mental development of an initial scene.  I get the idea for an initial scene from all kinds of sources.  To help get the creative juices flowing, let’s look at the initial scene.

  1. Meeting between the protagonist and the antagonist or the protagonist’s helper
  2. Action point in the plot
  3. Buildup to an exciting scene
  4. Indirect introduction of the protagonist

The protagonist is the novel and the initial scene.  If you look at the four basic types of initial scenes, you see the reflection of the protagonist in each one.  If you noticed my examples yesterday, I expressed the scene idea, but none were completely independent of the protagonist.  Indeed, in most cases, I get an idea with a protagonist.  The protagonist is incomplete, but a sketch to begin with.  You can start with a protagonist, but in my opinion, as we see above, the protagonist is never completely independent from the initial scene.  As the ideas above imply, we can start with the characters, specifically the protagonist, antagonist or protagonist’s helper, and develop an initial scene.

Let’s look at a subject that is really ignored in the modern era.  I’m not certain how much this can help your current writing.  I would argue that theoretically, this subject can really help those who write historical and futuristic fiction.  It depends on how your write your historical and futuristic fiction.  There are two ways to write historical fiction—let’s look at this.

The first and most common way to write historical fiction is to write a novel that projects modern ideas and history as historical ideas and history.  In other words to present modern ideas and historical ideas as the same.  I think this is perhaps the most egregious and perverse means of presenting a false view of history.  The author is either completely ignorant of the past, is intentionally attempting to education people in a false view of history, or both.  The real historical world is very different both culturally and socially from our current world.  The true author attempts to convey this in historical writing.

The second and less common means of historical writing is to actually incorporate the past into a novel to convey the actual way people thought and acted in the past.  This approach actually goes back into time to give a complete view of the way the people thought and acted.  To this end, let’s look at how the world changed and how people thought in the past.  This is more of a historical look at the world for the purpose of understanding how the world worked in the past and how people thought and acted.  We’ll use historical information to see what concerned affected their lives. Here is a list of potential issues.  We’ll look at them in detail:

  1. Vocabulary
  2. Ideas
  3. Social construction
  4. Culture
  5. Politics
  6. History
  7. Language
  8. Common knowledge
  9. Common sense
  10. Reflected culture
  11. Reflected history
  12. Reflected society
  13. Truth
  14. Food
  15. Money
  16. Weapons and warfare
  17. Transportation
  18. Communication
  19. Writing
  20. Education

Transportation means have changed significantly over time.

Obviously, or perhaps not so obviously, warfare is all about fire and maneuver.  This was true from the very beginning of infantry with sticks to cavalry to tanks to whatever the future might bring.  Fire and maneuver is all about speed, transportation, and fire power.

In space, the less the better.  Space is dangerous and combat in space is dangerous.  There is no place to hide, distances are huge, speeds and forces are horrendous, fuel is limited, supplies are limited, and a mistake of minutes of degrees can be uncorrectable.  All of these play in tactics and strategy in space.

When I write, the less the better, I mean exposure.  Therefore, drones or uninhabited vehicles might be the desired and best weapons.  Humans in spacecraft are vulnerable for many reasons.  It isn’t much difference from high altitude warfare, but at high altitude, the only place to go is down.  In space, there is just more space, unless you get caught in a gravity well and burn up, or worse.

In space tactics, you can expect crews and ships to prepare by depressurizing, using satellites, and drones, and keeping their distance.  I suspect the use of high forces except for acceleration and deceleration, will be unusual.  What I mean is you will not see dog fights or fancy turns, banking, or movements like you see in Star Bores or other fake science movies.  In space, you never need to bank like you do in the atmosphere.  If someone is behind you, you simply rotate around and shoot them in the face.  There is no place to hide.  Without gravity compensation, a ship could never make a quick change of direction—they would remain in the attack area of the other ship.

In addition, movement at the speeds that can be generated in space, would make interception and tracking difficult.  For example, a ship moving at a similar velocity would be able to launch an attack against another ship, but one ship is moving at velocities much greater than the other means the weapons could never catch the other ship.  Speed will be king because a ship at a much higher velocity, could easily launch a weapon that as long as it can intercept the enemy, would result in devastating destruction.  The problem is tracking and directing.  For example, minutes of degrees and tiny variances in course might cause a weapon to miss the target by miles.  Further, a very fast moving ship or weapon would have great difficulties changing its course especially in end game.

I expect that with technology and science, the future might solve some of these problems or reduce them, but they exist.  All of this gives the perceptive and creative author the opportunity to develop technology and methods to build excitement and entertainment into a scene of space warfare.  There is more to this.

In general, in my novels, I don’t ignore the issues I mentioned, I just use a broader view.  As an author, you can focus on many different aspects.  As I noted, you could focus on the speeds.  You could assume, as I did that the problem of speeds was solved by gravity control and other methods.  You must always include the difficulties and dangers of space.  You must always figure out the means to counter and work with weightlessness, lack of atmosphere, vector maneuvering and movement, and weapons.  As an author, these things are what you must determine and figure out.

What about space transportation?

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Advertisements
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing – part x933, Writing a Novel, Space War

21 October 2019, Writing – part x933, Writing a Novel, Space War

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker          

Today:  Why don’t we go back to the basics and just writing a novel?  I can tell you what I do, and show you how I go about putting a novel together.  We can start with developing an idea then move into the details of the writing.

To start a novel, I picture an initial scene.  I may start from a protagonist or just launch into mental development of an initial scene.  I get the idea for an initial scene from all kinds of sources.  To help get the creative juices flowing, let’s look at the initial scene.

  1. Meeting between the protagonist and the antagonist or the protagonist’s helper
  2. Action point in the plot
  3. Buildup to an exciting scene
  4. Indirect introduction of the protagonist

The protagonist is the novel and the initial scene.  If you look at the four basic types of initial scenes, you see the reflection of the protagonist in each one.  If you noticed my examples yesterday, I expressed the scene idea, but none were completely independent of the protagonist.  Indeed, in most cases, I get an idea with a protagonist.  The protagonist is incomplete, but a sketch to begin with.  You can start with a protagonist, but in my opinion, as we see above, the protagonist is never completely independent from the initial scene.  As the ideas above imply, we can start with the characters, specifically the protagonist, antagonist or protagonist’s helper, and develop an initial scene.

Let’s look at a subject that is really ignored in the modern era.  I’m not certain how much this can help your current writing.  I would argue that theoretically, this subject can really help those who write historical and futuristic fiction.  It depends on how your write your historical and futuristic fiction.  There are two ways to write historical fiction—let’s look at this.

The first and most common way to write historical fiction is to write a novel that projects modern ideas and history as historical ideas and history.  In other words to present modern ideas and historical ideas as the same.  I think this is perhaps the most egregious and perverse means of presenting a false view of history.  The author is either completely ignorant of the past, is intentionally attempting to education people in a false view of history, or both.  The real historical world is very different both culturally and socially from our current world.  The true author attempts to convey this in historical writing.

The second and less common means of historical writing is to actually incorporate the past into a novel to convey the actual way people thought and acted in the past.  This approach actually goes back into time to give a complete view of the way the people thought and acted.  To this end, let’s look at how the world changed and how people thought in the past.  This is more of a historical look at the world for the purpose of understanding how the world worked in the past and how people thought and acted.  We’ll use historical information to see what concerned affected their lives. Here is a list of potential issues.  We’ll look at them in detail:

  1. Vocabulary
  2. Ideas
  3. Social construction
  4. Culture
  5. Politics
  6. History
  7. Language
  8. Common knowledge
  9. Common sense
  10. Reflected culture
  11. Reflected history
  12. Reflected society
  13. Truth
  14. Food
  15. Money
  16. Weapons and warfare
  17. Transportation
  18. Communication
  19. Writing
  20. Education

Transportation means have changed significantly over time.

Obviously, or perhaps not so obviously, warfare is all about fire and maneuver.  This was true from the very beginning of infantry with sticks to cavalry to tanks to whatever the future might bring.  Fire and maneuver is all about speed, transportation, and fire power.

Space warfare is all in the future.  As far as we know, humanity has never engaged in space based warfare in its history.  That is unless you want to count satellites as having engaged in space warfare.

About twenty years ago, I wrote a paper about developing a space force.  In the paper, I compared space warfare today to balloons and planes in world war one.  Balloons and in some cases kites were used in world war one as communication, scouting, and artillery direction systems.  They had no fire and no maneuver capability.  They couldn’t attack directly or move.

Likewise, satellites have very limited maneuver capability and due to current international arms agreements, as far as we know, they don’t include any weapons.  That doesn’t mean they couldn’t or that weapons have not been tested against them.  What it means is that satellites are, by definition, balloons and kites.  You might arm them, and you might move them around a little, but they really don’t have fire and maneuver.  Balloons, kites, and aircraft in world war one were the same.

Balloons and kites could only move around a little, and they weren’t armed.  Aircraft could.  Aircraft didn’t make as good a platform for scouting, artillery fire, or communication, but they had fire and maneuver.  They could move quickly, for the time, and could fire on almost everything on the battle field.  They were largely invulnerable due to their fire and maneuver.  This changed quickly as troops got weapons and became less fearful of the airplane, but still aircraft are largely protected from ground fire.  The trick is to be able to deliver bombs and other firepower from a safe altitude—or to be able to get back to a safe altitude before the enemy can take a successful shot.  The successful shot is the big problem.  Golden bbs are usually what they are called.  It is hard to hit a fast, airborne, moving target.

In any case, balloons and kites are like satellites.  Aircraft are like spacecraft.  Until we get spacecraft that can apply fire and maneuver, we will not get past the balloon and kite stage of the space warfare.

We can weaponized satellites with weapons and provide them maneuver.  Basically, we can make them remotely controlled fire and maneuver spacecraft.  You should be able to imagine warfare in this manner, and future warfare.  Drones or remote control devices in space will be the beginning and the end in space warfare.  One of the reasons is the danger of spaceborne human systems.

Space is dangerous.  You can’t just go spacing on a lark.  You need to have multiple and more safety systems and backups to keep your soldiers safe.  You have to have pressure suits, pressure systems, armor, sealing systems, multiple backups, extra fuel, extra oxygen plus mixers, water, and weapons.

Space warfare is complex and difficult.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing – part x932, Writing a Novel, Air War

20 October 2019, Writing – part x932, Writing a Novel, Air War

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker          

Today:  Why don’t we go back to the basics and just writing a novel?  I can tell you what I do, and show you how I go about putting a novel together.  We can start with developing an idea then move into the details of the writing.

To start a novel, I picture an initial scene.  I may start from a protagonist or just launch into mental development of an initial scene.  I get the idea for an initial scene from all kinds of sources.  To help get the creative juices flowing, let’s look at the initial scene.

  1. Meeting between the protagonist and the antagonist or the protagonist’s helper
  2. Action point in the plot
  3. Buildup to an exciting scene
  4. Indirect introduction of the protagonist

The protagonist is the novel and the initial scene.  If you look at the four basic types of initial scenes, you see the reflection of the protagonist in each one.  If you noticed my examples yesterday, I expressed the scene idea, but none were completely independent of the protagonist.  Indeed, in most cases, I get an idea with a protagonist.  The protagonist is incomplete, but a sketch to begin with.  You can start with a protagonist, but in my opinion, as we see above, the protagonist is never completely independent from the initial scene.  As the ideas above imply, we can start with the characters, specifically the protagonist, antagonist or protagonist’s helper, and develop an initial scene.

Let’s look at a subject that is really ignored in the modern era.  I’m not certain how much this can help your current writing.  I would argue that theoretically, this subject can really help those who write historical and futuristic fiction.  It depends on how your write your historical and futuristic fiction.  There are two ways to write historical fiction—let’s look at this.

The first and most common way to write historical fiction is to write a novel that projects modern ideas and history as historical ideas and history.  In other words to present modern ideas and historical ideas as the same.  I think this is perhaps the most egregious and perverse means of presenting a false view of history.  The author is either completely ignorant of the past, is intentionally attempting to education people in a false view of history, or both.  The real historical world is very different both culturally and socially from our current world.  The true author attempts to convey this in historical writing.

The second and less common means of historical writing is to actually incorporate the past into a novel to convey the actual way people thought and acted in the past.  This approach actually goes back into time to give a complete view of the way the people thought and acted.  To this end, let’s look at how the world changed and how people thought in the past.  This is more of a historical look at the world for the purpose of understanding how the world worked in the past and how people thought and acted.  We’ll use historical information to see what concerned affected their lives. Here is a list of potential issues.  We’ll look at them in detail:

  1. Vocabulary
  2. Ideas
  3. Social construction
  4. Culture
  5. Politics
  6. History
  7. Language
  8. Common knowledge
  9. Common sense
  10. Reflected culture
  11. Reflected history
  12. Reflected society
  13. Truth
  14. Food
  15. Money
  16. Weapons and warfare
  17. Transportation
  18. Communication
  19. Writing
  20. Education

Transportation means have changed significantly over time.

Obviously, or perhaps not so obviously, warfare is all about fire and maneuver.  This was true from the very beginning of infantry with sticks to cavalry to tanks to whatever the future might bring.  Fire and maneuver is all about speed, transportation, and fire power.

Obviously, aircraft have a premium on fire and maneuver.  They also have vulnerabilities.  Air warfare strategy and tactics take advantage of these capabilities and vulnerabilities.

Last time, I mentioned three degrees or conditions of air warfare.  All three involve the freedom of air forces to fly in the battlespace.  Air superiority means one side has free play in the air above the battlespace.  This is what the initial air war is all about.  The enemy can have two strategies to achieve control of the air.

The first and most direct is to control the air with tactical fighters.  These can apply target seeking missiles from a distance or close in to destroy the enemy’s aircraft.  In general, today, if it flies it dies.  Air to air fighters can detect and attack anything in the air in the battlespace.  This means that less capable aircraft are toast, and anything less than a first world fighter has almost no hope of survival.  There is a lot to this, but that’s the basics of modern air power.  I’ll also mention that control of the airspace requires constant surveillance, and you can only control that which you can cover.

The second means to control the air is with anti-air ground forces.  These include surface to air missiles and radar or sensor directed anti-aircraft guns.  These can be very effective, but they can only cover what they can cover.  You have to have a lot of them and wherever they aren’t or aren’t looking, the enemy can have free play in the air.

In general, during the Cold War, Soviet and Soviet allied aircraft were not capable of countering Free World fighters.  The Soviet surface to air missiles and anti-aircraft artillery were the main means of countering Free World airpower.  They were relatively effective in Vietnam until they ran out of missiles.  Specifically, they were able to counter the early jet fighters, but not later aircraft which carried more and more sophisticated protection, attack, and defensive capabilities.

In this period, the Free World developed anti-radar missiles which could lock on and attack the radars that directed surface to air missiles.  They also developed jamming and spoofing electronics as well as chaff and flares for protection.  It wasn’t foolproof, but it was effective.  The allies in Vietnam went from high air losses to very few losses.  Likewise, you see in most cases, the use of electronic protection and systems significantly bought back the airspace from ground defenses.

Today, radar evading fighters and bombers with sophisticated electronic protection along with defensive techniques allow quick destruction of ground anti-air defenses, which then leads to air superiority over the battlespace.  As I noted, this has been a characteristic of all the battles in the Middle East.  Less than a week buys complete control of the air.  This may or may not be the future of all warfare, but today, air power is nearly completely dependent on electronic protection as well as fire and maneuver.  The air war will go to the side with the best electronic active and passive attack and defense and anti-electronic defenses.

We can expect space warfare to be something similar.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing – part x931, Writing a Novel, Aircraft in Warfare

19 October 2019, Writing – part x931, Writing a Novel, Aircraft in Warfare

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker          

Today:  Why don’t we go back to the basics and just writing a novel?  I can tell you what I do, and show you how I go about putting a novel together.  We can start with developing an idea then move into the details of the writing.

To start a novel, I picture an initial scene.  I may start from a protagonist or just launch into mental development of an initial scene.  I get the idea for an initial scene from all kinds of sources.  To help get the creative juices flowing, let’s look at the initial scene.

  1. Meeting between the protagonist and the antagonist or the protagonist’s helper
  2. Action point in the plot
  3. Buildup to an exciting scene
  4. Indirect introduction of the protagonist

The protagonist is the novel and the initial scene.  If you look at the four basic types of initial scenes, you see the reflection of the protagonist in each one.  If you noticed my examples yesterday, I expressed the scene idea, but none were completely independent of the protagonist.  Indeed, in most cases, I get an idea with a protagonist.  The protagonist is incomplete, but a sketch to begin with.  You can start with a protagonist, but in my opinion, as we see above, the protagonist is never completely independent from the initial scene.  As the ideas above imply, we can start with the characters, specifically the protagonist, antagonist or protagonist’s helper, and develop an initial scene.

Let’s look at a subject that is really ignored in the modern era.  I’m not certain how much this can help your current writing.  I would argue that theoretically, this subject can really help those who write historical and futuristic fiction.  It depends on how your write your historical and futuristic fiction.  There are two ways to write historical fiction—let’s look at this.

The first and most common way to write historical fiction is to write a novel that projects modern ideas and history as historical ideas and history.  In other words to present modern ideas and historical ideas as the same.  I think this is perhaps the most egregious and perverse means of presenting a false view of history.  The author is either completely ignorant of the past, is intentionally attempting to education people in a false view of history, or both.  The real historical world is very different both culturally and socially from our current world.  The true author attempts to convey this in historical writing.

The second and less common means of historical writing is to actually incorporate the past into a novel to convey the actual way people thought and acted in the past.  This approach actually goes back into time to give a complete view of the way the people thought and acted.  To this end, let’s look at how the world changed and how people thought in the past.  This is more of a historical look at the world for the purpose of understanding how the world worked in the past and how people thought and acted.  We’ll use historical information to see what concerned affected their lives. Here is a list of potential issues.  We’ll look at them in detail:

  1. Vocabulary
  2. Ideas
  3. Social construction
  4. Culture
  5. Politics
  6. History
  7. Language
  8. Common knowledge
  9. Common sense
  10. Reflected culture
  11. Reflected history
  12. Reflected society
  13. Truth
  14. Food
  15. Money
  16. Weapons and warfare
  17. Transportation
  18. Communication
  19. Writing
  20. Education

Transportation means have changed significantly over time.

Obviously, or perhaps not so obviously, warfare is all about fire and maneuver.  This was true from the very beginning of infantry with sticks to cavalry to tanks to whatever the future might bring.  Fire and maneuver is all about speed, transportation, and fire power.

The application of fire and maneuver is the point of all warfare.  As a military person, on the defensive, you want to take the high ground (defensive ground) and prevent the enemy from disrupting your command and control and supplies.  On the offensive, you want to bypass or defeat (bypass is better) and disrupt the enemy’s command and control and supplies.

Both effective defense and effective offense means you need to maneuver into position before the enemy and to use your firepower to defeat or at least disrupt.  Airpower is perfect for fire and maneuver.  It has its limitations and vulnerabilities, but it has nearly unlimited maneuver and immediate firepower.

With modern airpower, you can get to your target quickly and what you can see with your sensors, you can kill.  This wasn’t always true and there are vulnerabilities and limitations with airpower.  In addition to fire and maneuver as we have described warfare, airpower also has the ability for near immediate transportation.  Helicopters and rotary wing aircraft can quickly move troops and in some cases ground vehicles into combat.  Fix winged aircraft like C-130s, C-5s, and C-17s can drop troops and heavy vehicles into combat or land them close to the points where they are needed.  Fire and maneuver depends on maneuver to arrive at the point to attack or the point to defend.  Airpower can deliver this maneuver at speeds well above anything imaginable in the past.  In the future, we can expect this speed and capability to increase.

More slowly, we can expect the vulnerability and limitations of airpower to decrease.  The vulnerability and limitations of airpower are related to the visibility and weakness to aircraft.  From fixed wing to rotary wing aircraft, since they must fly, they are limited in the armor and protection that they can have and still carry stuff and weapons.  Additionally, you can see them in the air.  It isn’t necessarily true that what you can see you can kill, but depending on the weapons, you can try.  Aircraft carry armor and specific protection, but their speed, maneuver, and altitude provides significant protection from most ground weapons.  Specialty anti-aircraft weapons are another problem.  They are designed to shoot down aircraft.  Then rotary wing aircraft have their own problems.

Unlike fixed wing aircraft, rotary wing are limited by airspeed, altitude, and maneuver.  This means they must keep hidden and close to the ground and protection, and they must incorporate special defensive capabilities.  The advantages of rotary wing are also their chief vulnerability, and provide their main protection.

In air warfare, we usually recognize three different levels of air conflict.  The first is total denial of freedom of operations.  This is where the enemy can shoot down almost every aircraft that enters the battlespace.  We saw this in the Cold War Era with mostly Soviet and Eastern Bloc nations.  North Vietnam had certain areas that had near total denial of freedom of operations for airpower.

The second is partial denial of freedom of operations.  This is the normal state of most battle space with high end warfare.  Neither side has absolute air superiority, but can exercise air superiority over various parts of the battlespace based on the airpower and ground weapons that are present.

The third and most common for modern warfare is complete air superiority.  During the wars against terror in the middle east, the allies gained air superiority early by destroying anti-air weapons on the ground and the air forces of the enemies.  This allowed the allies unrestricted air operations against the enemies.  I’ll get to these tactics and strategies next.

Then there is the air component in warfare.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing – part x930, Writing a Novel, Vehicles in Warfare

18 October 2019, Writing – part x930, Writing a Novel, Vehicles in Warfare

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker          

Today:  Why don’t we go back to the basics and just writing a novel?  I can tell you what I do, and show you how I go about putting a novel together.  We can start with developing an idea then move into the details of the writing.

To start a novel, I picture an initial scene.  I may start from a protagonist or just launch into mental development of an initial scene.  I get the idea for an initial scene from all kinds of sources.  To help get the creative juices flowing, let’s look at the initial scene.

  1. Meeting between the protagonist and the antagonist or the protagonist’s helper
  2. Action point in the plot
  3. Buildup to an exciting scene
  4. Indirect introduction of the protagonist

The protagonist is the novel and the initial scene.  If you look at the four basic types of initial scenes, you see the reflection of the protagonist in each one.  If you noticed my examples yesterday, I expressed the scene idea, but none were completely independent of the protagonist.  Indeed, in most cases, I get an idea with a protagonist.  The protagonist is incomplete, but a sketch to begin with.  You can start with a protagonist, but in my opinion, as we see above, the protagonist is never completely independent from the initial scene.  As the ideas above imply, we can start with the characters, specifically the protagonist, antagonist or protagonist’s helper, and develop an initial scene.

Let’s look at a subject that is really ignored in the modern era.  I’m not certain how much this can help your current writing.  I would argue that theoretically, this subject can really help those who write historical and futuristic fiction.  It depends on how your write your historical and futuristic fiction.  There are two ways to write historical fiction—let’s look at this.

The first and most common way to write historical fiction is to write a novel that projects modern ideas and history as historical ideas and history.  In other words to present modern ideas and historical ideas as the same.  I think this is perhaps the most egregious and perverse means of presenting a false view of history.  The author is either completely ignorant of the past, is intentionally attempting to education people in a false view of history, or both.  The real historical world is very different both culturally and socially from our current world.  The true author attempts to convey this in historical writing.

The second and less common means of historical writing is to actually incorporate the past into a novel to convey the actual way people thought and acted in the past.  This approach actually goes back into time to give a complete view of the way the people thought and acted.  To this end, let’s look at how the world changed and how people thought in the past.  This is more of a historical look at the world for the purpose of understanding how the world worked in the past and how people thought and acted.  We’ll use historical information to see what concerned affected their lives. Here is a list of potential issues.  We’ll look at them in detail:

  1. Vocabulary
  2. Ideas
  3. Social construction
  4. Culture
  5. Politics
  6. History
  7. Language
  8. Common knowledge
  9. Common sense
  10. Reflected culture
  11. Reflected history
  12. Reflected society
  13. Truth
  14. Food
  15. Money
  16. Weapons and warfare
  17. Transportation
  18. Communication
  19. Writing
  20. Education

Transportation means have changed significantly over time.

It is difficult to use trains in warfare although they can be used to transport men and equipment.  They also have fixed locations (rails) and they are easy to destroy or at least derail (pun obviously intended).

For all the reasons the individual finds trains inconvenient, so does the military.  Thus the moment the motor car became available, the military wanted them.  You have to also realize, the military is never on the forefront of technology or capability.  Their traditions many times work to their disadvantage.  Thus in World War Two, when most farmers were using tractors and machines, the militaries of Europe were dependent on horses and horse drawn transportation.

I don’t need to tell you that horses are more difficult to keep well in a war than any human or any machine.  The horses were doomed.  I hope most of them ended up in the bellies of the soldiers because they wouldn’t be worth much more.  The problem of horses in warfare is one of supply and care.  You can’t keep them supplied easily and you need soldiers who can care for them.  If you’ve ever cared for horses or other farm animals, you know what I mean.

In any case, the advent and eventual integration of the motor vehicle into warfare changed warfare significantly.  You can see this change between the trenches of WWI and the open maneuver warfare of WWII.  This was not all due to motor vehicles, but it was all due to the integration of the motor vehicle into military operations.  The main reason was the tank.

Tanks entered the world during WWI.  They were not very effective because they were used for infantry support and used infantry tactics.  The purpose for tanks was and should have been fire and maneuver.  The British and French continued their infantry support concept while the Germans developed the idea of the Blitzkrieg (fire and maneuver).  While the British and French were developing tanks with heavy armor, infantry support weapon (artillery), and to move at infantry speeds, the Germans were developing light, armor defeating, and fast tanks to flank and destroy command and control and military depots.  This was Blitzkrieg.  The Germans had perfected the Blitzkrieg with infantry near the end of WWI.  They used tanks in WWII to accomplish major victories over the infantry thinking Allies.  And then came Patton and the Americans.  If you didn’t know, the Germans had moved their tanks into a more defensive state as WWII progressed.  Their leadership forgot its own Blitzkrieg concepts and began building larger, heavier, better armored, and equipped tanks.  The Americans still relied on light, fast, anti-armor tanks in great numbers.  It wasn’t just the numbers that overwhelmed the Germans—it was the use of the Blitzkrieg.

Today, the military calls the Blitzkrieg, fire and maneuver.  They still use the concepts of WWII in modern wars.  Sometimes this works and sometimes it doesn’t.  The use and integration of armored vehicles into military operations is still a critical feature and factor in warfare, but infantry are ascendant again.  In what the military call nonconventional and special warfare, infantry are necessary and critical—the transportation is still essential, but more for movement and supply as opposed to open warfare.

Then there is the air component in warfare.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing – part x929, Writing a Novel, Personal Flight

17 October 2019, Writing – part x929, Writing a Novel, Personal Flight

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker          

Today:  Why don’t we go back to the basics and just writing a novel?  I can tell you what I do, and show you how I go about putting a novel together.  We can start with developing an idea then move into the details of the writing.

To start a novel, I picture an initial scene.  I may start from a protagonist or just launch into mental development of an initial scene.  I get the idea for an initial scene from all kinds of sources.  To help get the creative juices flowing, let’s look at the initial scene.

  1. Meeting between the protagonist and the antagonist or the protagonist’s helper
  2. Action point in the plot
  3. Buildup to an exciting scene
  4. Indirect introduction of the protagonist

The protagonist is the novel and the initial scene.  If you look at the four basic types of initial scenes, you see the reflection of the protagonist in each one.  If you noticed my examples yesterday, I expressed the scene idea, but none were completely independent of the protagonist.  Indeed, in most cases, I get an idea with a protagonist.  The protagonist is incomplete, but a sketch to begin with.  You can start with a protagonist, but in my opinion, as we see above, the protagonist is never completely independent from the initial scene.  As the ideas above imply, we can start with the characters, specifically the protagonist, antagonist or protagonist’s helper, and develop an initial scene.

Let’s look at a subject that is really ignored in the modern era.  I’m not certain how much this can help your current writing.  I would argue that theoretically, this subject can really help those who write historical and futuristic fiction.  It depends on how your write your historical and futuristic fiction.  There are two ways to write historical fiction—let’s look at this.

The first and most common way to write historical fiction is to write a novel that projects modern ideas and history as historical ideas and history.  In other words to present modern ideas and historical ideas as the same.  I think this is perhaps the most egregious and perverse means of presenting a false view of history.  The author is either completely ignorant of the past, is intentionally attempting to education people in a false view of history, or both.  The real historical world is very different both culturally and socially from our current world.  The true author attempts to convey this in historical writing.

The second and less common means of historical writing is to actually incorporate the past into a novel to convey the actual way people thought and acted in the past.  This approach actually goes back into time to give a complete view of the way the people thought and acted.  To this end, let’s look at how the world changed and how people thought in the past.  This is more of a historical look at the world for the purpose of understanding how the world worked in the past and how people thought and acted.  We’ll use historical information to see what concerned affected their lives. Here is a list of potential issues.  We’ll look at them in detail:

  1. Vocabulary
  2. Ideas
  3. Social construction
  4. Culture
  5. Politics
  6. History
  7. Language
  8. Common knowledge
  9. Common sense
  10. Reflected culture
  11. Reflected history
  12. Reflected society
  13. Truth
  14. Food
  15. Money
  16. Weapons and warfare
  17. Transportation
  18. Communication
  19. Writing
  20. Education

Transportation means have changed significantly over time.

Let’s look at air transportation.  It started as entertainment, and moved quickly to the personal aircraft.  And then came the cattle cars.  Airlines are cattle cars.  The expectation for air travel was just like ground travel.  Ground travel started with the iron horse (locomotive) train.  This was the cattle cars, and people only stayed in them until they could afford their own automobiles.

The progress was distinctive.  Cattle cars (trains and busses), charter (taxis), and then the private automobile.  Aircraft should have gone rather quickly from cattle cars (airlines), to charter (air taxis), and then to private aircraft.  It was moving very quickly to the private aircraft, but this time the train and bus owners (airlines) had a plan to prevent the people from getting their taxis and private aircraft.  The means was regulations and cost.  The government was happy to accommodate because they always want to restrict free travel as much as they can.  Travel means freedom, and governments certainly don’t want unbridled freedom.

In 1974 more than 10,000 private and corporate aircraft called general aviation aircraft were delivered to private companies and citizens.  Last year less than 2,000 general aviation aircraft were delivered to private companies and citizens.  In 1974, everyone could charter an aircraft to get almost anywhere there was an airport.  People took airlines to hubs and then from the hubs to outer smaller airports.  The system was wonderful, but the airlines wanted to kill charter and private aviation.

The airlines did it by convincing the government to regulate charter and general aviation to the same degree it did nation and international carriers.  The reason was supposedly to improve safety.  It didn’t and there wasn’t a safety problem.  The problem was that the airlines wanted to destroy charter and private aviation.  The numbers don’t lie, and the lack of convenience in the airlines should be obvious.  A charter can take you anywhere at any time—the airlines have assured through government regulations that the cost will be high.  If you want to go to any airport at any time of the day, you can charter a flight.  You can’t do that with any airline.  With an airline, you have to go through the TSA maze, be two hours early, possibly lose your luggage, and be uncomfortable to get to somewhere kind of close to where you want to go.

In private and charter aviation, you travel in an aircraft that is safer than any airliner with no TSA, arrive five minutes prior to departure, never lose your baggage, and get to the place you want to go—a rental car comes directly to the aircraft beside your red carpet and you load it and go.  Charter and private aviation are only available to the wealthy and the diligent (pilots).

You should have your private aircraft, but the airlines are working hard every day to prevent this.  Eventually, you will have your flying car, but expect the airlines to carefully delay this technological transition.  They will do anything in their power to prevent your freedom to fly.

By the way, the government doesn’t like the idea that you can fly where you want either.  They don’t really want you to drive were you want.  Part of the push for self-driving automobiles is to restrict your transportation.  The government has already introduced ADS-B to the flying community—this tracks the position of every aircraft flying in the USA and eventually the world.  It’s required.  Just think what the government can and will know when it can track every place you go and have been in a car or an airplane.  By the way, military aircraft can turn off the tracking.

And then there were war machines.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing – part x928, Writing a Novel, Personal Rides

16 October 2019, Writing – part x928, Writing a Novel, Personal Rides

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  Deirdre and Sorcha are redirected to French finishing school where they discover difficult mysteries, people, and events.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker          

Today:  Why don’t we go back to the basics and just writing a novel?  I can tell you what I do, and show you how I go about putting a novel together.  We can start with developing an idea then move into the details of the writing.

To start a novel, I picture an initial scene.  I may start from a protagonist or just launch into mental development of an initial scene.  I get the idea for an initial scene from all kinds of sources.  To help get the creative juices flowing, let’s look at the initial scene.

  1. Meeting between the protagonist and the antagonist or the protagonist’s helper
  2. Action point in the plot
  3. Buildup to an exciting scene
  4. Indirect introduction of the protagonist

The protagonist is the novel and the initial scene.  If you look at the four basic types of initial scenes, you see the reflection of the protagonist in each one.  If you noticed my examples yesterday, I expressed the scene idea, but none were completely independent of the protagonist.  Indeed, in most cases, I get an idea with a protagonist.  The protagonist is incomplete, but a sketch to begin with.  You can start with a protagonist, but in my opinion, as we see above, the protagonist is never completely independent from the initial scene.  As the ideas above imply, we can start with the characters, specifically the protagonist, antagonist or protagonist’s helper, and develop an initial scene.

Let’s look at a subject that is really ignored in the modern era.  I’m not certain how much this can help your current writing.  I would argue that theoretically, this subject can really help those who write historical and futuristic fiction.  It depends on how your write your historical and futuristic fiction.  There are two ways to write historical fiction—let’s look at this.

The first and most common way to write historical fiction is to write a novel that projects modern ideas and history as historical ideas and history.  In other words to present modern ideas and historical ideas as the same.  I think this is perhaps the most egregious and perverse means of presenting a false view of history.  The author is either completely ignorant of the past, is intentionally attempting to education people in a false view of history, or both.  The real historical world is very different both culturally and socially from our current world.  The true author attempts to convey this in historical writing.

The second and less common means of historical writing is to actually incorporate the past into a novel to convey the actual way people thought and acted in the past.  This approach actually goes back into time to give a complete view of the way the people thought and acted.  To this end, let’s look at how the world changed and how people thought in the past.  This is more of a historical look at the world for the purpose of understanding how the world worked in the past and how people thought and acted.  We’ll use historical information to see what concerned affected their lives. Here is a list of potential issues.  We’ll look at them in detail:

  1. Vocabulary
  2. Ideas
  3. Social construction
  4. Culture
  5. Politics
  6. History
  7. Language
  8. Common knowledge
  9. Common sense
  10. Reflected culture
  11. Reflected history
  12. Reflected society
  13. Truth
  14. Food
  15. Money
  16. Weapons and warfare
  17. Transportation
  18. Communication
  19. Writing
  20. Education

Transportation means have changed significantly over time.

At first real transportation was about cattle cars—not usually literally, but you had to sit in proximity to many other people, you had to be on time, and you could only travel to places the trains went.  This was obviously limiting.

The transportation companies tried to reduce the effect of these problems.  The wealthy could buy more space and private spaces, but they still had to be on time and they could only go where the trains ran.  The world was becoming smaller, but not small enough.  Someone finally pried the people out of the cattle cars.

That person invented the motor car—the automobile.  The automobile ideally needed a road and the better the road the better, but an automobile was much more capable than wagons and horses and oxen—transportation in a moment became infinitely better.

At first, the roads were limited and most people couldn’t afford automobiles, but they could ride on buses or taxi cabs.  These were chartered automobiles.  These weren’t that new, buses and taxis existed in the age of the carriage.  Not everyone could afford carriages and horses, but automobiles were ultimately affordable.

How can that be?  The reason is that the cost of commodities and products always go down with time.  The cost of operations can and should go down, but they can only go down so far.  The cost of maintaining horses or oxen is very high.  You need space, feed, animal doctors, and they eventually die.  A common automobile engine at the beginning produced about 100 times the power of a horse at a significant reduction in cost.  For example, I have to feed a horse about a bale of hay a day.  I can run an automobile all day with a few gallons of fuel—and I am getting the same power as 100 plus horses.

The maximum speed of an encumbered horse might be about 30 miles per hour, but a horse can’t keep that speed for very long.  They might average about the same as a person 5 to 8 miles an hour.  An automobile doesn’t require space, it does require fuel and occasional maintenance.  You can name it, but you don’t need to.  In any case, cars are operationally much less expensive than a carriage…and the average person could own one.

In the beginning, and even today, you don’t need to—you can charter an automobile, hire a taxi.  You can also rent an automobile.  The most important point of the automobile is you don’t have to be on time, and you can have pure privacy.  Rent or own and it is yours.  You can travel wherever roads go and even were roads don’t go.  Ultimately, the governments became afraid of the freedom the automobile presented to the average person, they began discovering ways to curb the automobile and the ability to travel.

The first was a license.  You couldn’t just let anyone drive.  That willowed out many of the poor and the disadvantaged, but it wasn’t enough.  In some nations, the cost of a license to drive is as much as $10,000 a year.  This definitely keeps the poor and disadvantaged off the road.

The next means was to make the cost and licensing of automobiles very expensive.  In most European nations, the cost to license a car is about $10,000 a year.  The nations, to protect the people, force auto makers to put all kinds of expensive dubious safety devices on the automobiles.  These make the cost of the vehicle go up significantly.

The third means is through taxes.  Fuel taxes make car operations very high.  Car taxes, make purchasing expensive.  Property taxes, keep the costs high.

Authoritarian governments don’t want people to be able to travel without the permission of the government.  Automobiles give the average person the ability to move where and when they want.  The only means of transportation the governments fear more than automobile transportation is air transportation.

And then there were war machines.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment