Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 888, Novel Development, Information not Relevant to the Climax

10 December 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 888, Novel Development, Information not Relevant to the Climax

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Here is my list of ways an author might add extraneous writing to a novel. Let’s look at the second.

  1. Material not relevant to the climax or plot.
  2. Characters or character arcs not relevant to the climax or plot.
  3. Side stories.
  4. Information not relevant to the climax, setting, or plot.
  5. Excessive storylines.
  6. Lack of a sufficient telic flaw.
  7. Incorrect protagonist.

Most of the time, I get irritated at writers because they don’t include enough in the setting. Plainly, you can include too much description and especially description not related to the climax or plot—what about other information that isn’t necessarily part of the setting or description?

At the risk of repetition, an author can always erroneously include information that is not relevant to the climax, setting, or plot. Information in the setting that isn’t relevant is relatively easy to find and exclude. On the other hand, other information may not be. I already covered extraneous characters, so the question is what is other information that isn’t relevant? These are very difficult parts to tease from the plot.

If you can view your writing in terms of scenes—identify the scenes that are action based and those that are conversation based. The immediate question to ask in this context is does the action and/or the conversation directly or indirectly support the climax (the telic flaw). I’ll go for indirect as long as you understand what exactly is indirect. For example, in our overused detective mystery example, if the conversation or the action provides a clue to the mystery and the resolution of the climax, the information isn’t extraneous. Usually, the indicator of the relevancy of action or conversation is the presence of the protagonist. In this case, you have an immediate indicator of relevance—if the protagonist (detective, in this case) is present, the action and/or conversation is likely relevant. On the other hand, even with the protagonist present, a discussion of the protagonist’s love for her mother may or may not be relevant.

I think you get the picture. Again, is the protagonist present? Does the action or conversation support the telic flaw or the climax? A good author evaluates every part of the novel for this this kind of relevance of information.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 887, Novel Development, Information not Relevant

9 December 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 887, Novel Development, Information not Relevant

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Here is my list of ways an author might add extraneous writing to a novel. Let’s look at the second.

  1. Material not relevant to the climax or plot.
  2. Characters or character arcs not relevant to the climax or plot.
  3. Side stories.
  4. Information not relevant to the climax, setting, or plot.
  5. Excessive storylines.
  6. Lack of a sufficient telic flaw.
  7. Incorrect protagonist.

Directly related to side stories is information not relevant to the climax, setting, or plot. Where a side story is not relevant to the climax or the plot, it might be to the setting and certainly to the characters. I’m advocating you carefully examine your writing to delete or rewrite anything in the novel that is not relevant to the climax, setting, or plot. Specifically, this is information that is unnecessary for the novel.

Let’s look at each area. In setting, if you are writing a science fiction novel, the setting description of how something works in your universe—for example, how faster than light travel works is definitely an important point in the setting of the novel. If can also be important in the climax and the plot if either is related to how faster than light travel works. In a science fiction novel, almost any description of science or technology is a reasonable setting concept and should be included in the writing. If it also supports the plot and climax, all the better.

In a non science fiction novel, the description of unusual science or technology might also be a point of the setting. In general, most description of setting is reasonable to a degree. Here’s where it isn’t. Let’s say you describe in detail a restaurant that your characters have dinner in—that is completely reasonable. A detailed description of the area around the restaurant is also reasonable—as long as the restaurant itself gets most of the description. On the other hand, if you gave a detailed commentary of the area where the characters or the novel don’t go or interact, that is not relevant to the setting at all. If the information is relevant to the climax of the plot, it should be included, but if it is just description of a setting where the characters, most specifically, the protagonist doesn’t go—you have written a travel dialog that should be removed from your novel.

Not all description is equal, and although I don’t like to dissuade any author from writing setting and description, you can go overboard. I have read novels that did read like travel guides. Leave the travel guides to those kinds of writers. If you follow Arlo Guthrie’s advice of 500 words for major settings and characters, 300 words for secondary settings and characters, and 100 words for all others, you will not go wrong. Keep out the extra stuff that has nothing to do with your novel.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 886.5, Novel Development, more Side Stories

8 December 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 886.5, Novel Development, more Side Stories

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Here is my list of ways an author might add extraneous writing to a novel. Let’s look at the second.

  1. Material not relevant to the climax or plot.
  2. Characters or character arcs not relevant to the climax or plot.
  3. Side stories.
  4. Information not relevant to the climax, setting, or plot.
  5. Excessive storylines.
  6. Lack of a sufficient telic flaw.
  7. Incorrect protagonist.

Look for side stories and dump them. Generally, a side story will show as a character arc or storyline that is not directly connected to the climax. I think side stories are easy to spot, but for some that might not be the case. Usually, you will find a side story tied to a protagonist’s helper or an antagonist. For example, a story about the protagonist’s helper’s love affair or the antagonist’s life are usually side stories. In almost every case, the protagonist’s helper’s love story or the antagonist’s life story are not related to the protagonist’s telic flaw or the climax. In some cases, they might be. In most cases, they are not.

The protagonist’s life story is important and their love affairs are important if tied to the protagonist’s helper or the antagonist, but everything must tie to the climax. Side stories notably are not about the protagonist. In the rare case they are, they do not refer to the telic flaw of the protagonist. This is the way to pick out a side story. Look for a storyline that is not about the protagonist. Also, look for a storyline about the protagonist that doesn’t include the telic flaw.

In our overused detective story example, a storyline about the detective prior to the murder/arson/larceny might be a side story if it doesn’t relate directly to the telic flaw and the climax. A story about her love interest in high school most likely is a side story. If the detective is chasing a person who killed a high school student or who is a high school student, the storyline might be pertinent to the novel.

The point is this, not everything about the protagonist needs to be revealed in the novel. Somethings just don’t apply within the context of the plot. Side stories don’t support the plot and should be removed.

Now about side stories.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 886, Novel Development, Side Stories

7 December 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 886, Novel Development, Side Stories

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Here is my list of ways an author might add extraneous writing to a novel. Let’s look at the second.

  1. Material not relevant to the climax or plot.
  2. Characters or character arcs not relevant to the climax or plot.
  3. Side stories.
  4. Information not relevant to the climax, setting, or plot.
  5. Excessive storylines.
  6. Lack of a sufficient telic flaw.
  7. Incorrect protagonist.

Side stories are prevalent in some types of literature and cultures—they are not appropriate in novels, or at least in classically designed novels. The Game of Thrones has really screwed up what many people think of as literature and novels. Thrones is not a classical novel design, and I predict that although many young (and perhaps older) authors might attempt to write like George R.R. Martin, none will get their novels published. Thrones is a cultural and a media phenomenon. It is an epic piece of writing in a non-epic world. I would like to see more, but I think Star Wars, James Bond, Star Trek, and other similar modern “epics” will overshadow, or just overpower it. I don’ think much of the others—that’s why I wrote “epic.” I do think Thrones is close to epic. Not that is it inherently great, but it is epic. Since Dune brought the first science fiction epic into to the world, and The Lord of the Rings brought the first fantasy epic into the world, society has been longing for more. They got Star Borz when they wanted Beowulf.

In any case, Rings and Dune are true epics and classically written. Their character arcs and storylines all interact with the climax. On the other hand, Thrones is not classically based or written. In it, the character arcs are more akin to short stories or side stories and the actual protagonist and telic flaw or climax arc (plot) is not identifiable. It really isn’t fair to call Thrones multiple character arcs side stories. To have a side story, you need an identifiable plot and protagonist. In any case, I suggest unless you are a best-selling author already and are paid well for such a novel, that you not attempt to write like Thrones. Such a novel is only sellable by an author like Martin.

Now about side stories.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 885, Novel Development, which Storylines

6 December 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 885, Novel Development, which Storylines

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Here is my list of ways an author might add extraneous writing to a novel. Let’s look at the second.

  1. Material not relevant to the climax or plot.
  2. Characters or character arcs not relevant to the climax or plot.
  3. Side stories.
  4. Information not relevant to the climax, setting, or plot.
  5. Excessive storylines.
  6. Lack of a sufficient telic flaw.
  7. Incorrect protagonist.

What should be included in the novel? Most precisely, what should be included on the stage of the novel? The character arcs that is their storylines intersect on the stage of the novel. The trick is to determine when, where, and who. The answer is relatively simple and goes back to the first test—where is the protagonist? In almost every case, if the protagonist is on the stage of the novel, the other characters whose character arcs (storylines) intersect are usually properly placed there. This is usually the case. The second test is the climax and plot. Most specifically, the character storyline (forget about the entire character arc) must support the climax (the telic flaw of the protagonist).

To test this, even if the protagonist isn’t on the stage, is the climax or the telic flaw on the stage. For example, the forensic doctor has a conversation concerning the murderer and the information he plans to give to the protagonist detective with the protagonist’s helper secretary. With this limited information, we can guess that the telic flaw and the climax deal with the solution of the murder. The conversation, since it is about the murder and what to give the protagonist makes this scene related to the climax and the telic flaw of the protagonist. In this case, the scene and the storylines of the characters in it are likely relevant to the novel and the plot.

You need to look at every scene this way. Especially if you have a problem with extraneous characters and character storylines, you need to investigate every scene to see if you don’t tie the characters to the protagonist and the climax (telic flaw). An extraneous storyline or character arc can also lead to side stories.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 884, Novel Development, Storylines

5 December 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 884, Novel Development, Storylines

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Here is my list of ways an author might add extraneous writing to a novel. Let’s look at the second.

  1. Material not relevant to the climax or plot.
  2. Characters or character arcs not relevant to the climax or plot.
  3. Side stories.
  4. Information not relevant to the climax, setting, or plot.
  5. Excessive storylines.
  6. Lack of a sufficient telic flaw.
  7. Incorrect protagonist.

Storylines are not character arcs. To be most specific, a character arc is a plot or a story line about a character. In most cases, in most novels, we are writing about the protagonist and the plot of the novel. On the other hand, novels like Ray Bradbury’s, Martian Chronicles are short story based and have more than one character arc, more than one plot, and more than one climax. Game of Thrones is similar. On the other hand, Tuf Voyaging, an excellent novel by George R. R. Martin, has a single protagonist, but multiple plots, climaxes, but a singular primary character arc. Tuf Voyaging is a collection of short stories bundled together in a novel. As I wrote, a character arc is a plot or a storyline about a single character. A novel can have multiple character arcs, but really shouldn’t. The protagonist’s character arc, the protagonist’s helper’s character arc, and the antagonist’s character arc are all that is necessary. And the protagonist’s character arc is really the only important character arc. Everything else can stay off stage—the revelation of the other characters is unnecessary and should not be included.

Let’s compare this to a storyline. A storyline is the character arc of any character as in intersects the plot of the novel. It is a segment of the character arc. This is what many refer to as a character arc, but it is only a part of the entire character arc. By this definition, even the major three characters (protagonist, protagonist’s helper, and antagonist) might not have complete character arcs. That’s is entirely the point. Their actions are the parts of the storylines that appear on the stage of the novel.

Every character has a storyline (a segment of their character arc) that shows up on the stage of the novel. These storylines in most cases intersect with the protagonist’s storyline—if they don’t intersect they are usually the parts that shouldn’t be included. In almost every case, the storylines of every character in the novel, should intersect directly or indirectly with the protagonist. This is a critical test of what should be included in the novel.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 883, Novel Development, more Character Arcs

4 December 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 883, Novel Development, more Character Arcs

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Here is my list of ways an author might add extraneous writing to a novel. Let’s look at the second.

  1. Material not relevant to the climax or plot.
  2. Characters or character arcs not relevant to the climax or plot.
  3. Side stories.
  4. Information not relevant to the climax, setting, or plot.
  5. Excessive storylines.
  6. Lack of a sufficient telic flaw.
  7. Incorrect protagonist.

What about novels with more than one intentional storyline and character arc—Game of Thrones, for example. My simple advice is—don’t write this way. If you are a best-selling author, and you can sell your novels to a movie producer, then go ahead. However, novels like Game of Thrones are not classical novels. They do not follow the five discrete parts of a novel I listed above. Game of Thrones is a special type of novel that is a collection of short stories or actually short novels interwoven into one large novel. This is not a good way to write a novel unless your novels are already found in Walmart or Sams.

I can assure you, you will not get this kind of novel published. You can always self-publish, but unless you are the greatest writer to put pen to paper, you will likely sell few copies. The reason is simple—very few people are willing to invest enormous amounts of time into unknown literature. A person might read a work that is in the 75,000 to 100,000 word range based on a review or a recommendation, but to ask a reader to invest in double, triple, or quadruple that is unreasonable. Once your writing is established, it isn’t unusual for a writer to put together a whole series of novels based on a set of characters, a theme, or a family. Harry Potter, The Hunger Games, Foundation, The Natty Bumpo Novels, The Lord of the Rings, The Ancient Light and all. It is highly unlikely, unless you are an established author to get a novel or set of novels of any great length published.

Back to the main point. Game of Thrones is a novel with multiple character arcs. Character arcs are also called storylines. Generally all storylines in a classical novel drive to the same climax. When a story or character arc doesn’t, you are either writing a multi-arc novel, or you have an extraneous character. See above. Don’t even contemplate writing a multi-arc novel. You will not be able to sell it. A better and cleaner approach is to write multiple novels. You can include multiple integrated storylines in each novel that supports a single climax in each novel. My main point is this—get rid of any orphan character arc. I’ll define this better and look at the storyline concept in a novel.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment