Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 931, Publishing, Protagonists, Example: Aegypt

22 January 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 931, Publishing, Protagonists, Example: Aegypt

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Would you like to write a novel that a publisher will consider? Would you like to write a novel that is published? How about one that sells?

Aegypt was published in 2008 by then Capstone which became Oaktara publishing. Aegypt is a novel about a French Foreign Legionnaire, Lieutenant Paul Bolang. Paul Bolang was a hero and soldier of the Great World War—World War One. He came from a military family and his father found him a place in the Paris Garrison. Paul was not comfortable with life in time of peace. He ran to the bosom of the Foreign Legion to return to a world of fighting and bloodshed. Here is some information about Paul from the novel:

He lingered long over the breakfast of fresh croissants and coffee. The black liquid filled his senses, and too easily, he let the early morning touch of it along with the nicotine of his cigarette lull him into a languid peace.

The burning white of the table cloth and napkins, the ragged dried flowers that graced the center of the small officer’s table, and the taste of the strong coffee were too refined for this place of easy death. And, Paul had seen too much of death here to forget it so nonchalantly. Still, the thought didn’t stop his mind from wandering relaxed and unconcerned.

Unfortunately, that was always when the thoughts that brought him here came unbidden to his brain. Unlike Captain Ourain, he hadn’t been sent here on a punishment tour. He volunteered. It was too easy to say the Military Bureau in Paris became tiresome. It was harder to face the truth, that he would much rather fight the hordes of nomads and bandits than confront the boring day to day military operations in a peacetime army.

He liked command. He liked the pitch of battle, and he was very good at it. After the end of the Great War, when his father’s plans culminated in his appointment to an important and honorable billet, he discovered the inactivity stifling. He was weary after the years of combat, but he tasted blood, and found in military leadership, a power over men. He was intoxicated by battle and became heady at the spilling of blood in justice. He felt he had a power over evil, and he became an angel of vengeance over the crimes of men.

Paul gradually came to himself. He held the coffee cup in a tense grip. He consciously relaxed his grip and set the cup down gently.

The blood of men was like nicotine and expresso; it existed to feed his lungs and senses with the musty scent of death. He was good at it too. His men followed him to their deaths. Success in battle overwhelmed them. His confidence became theirs. His zeal was theirs. They basked in the power his expertise brought.

When Paul was first assigned to Fort Saint, the outpost was almost overrun by the desert bandits. The Legionnaires were undisciplined and surly. Their combat losses were astounding. The peoples of Tozeur and Nefta held the Legionnaires in contempt. As was the intention of the Legionnaire commander of Tunisia and the Foreign Bureau when they assigned him, Paul changed all that. Paul had Sergeant Maurice le Boehm reassigned to the Fort. Paul worked with Sergeant le Boehm before. They were military comrades of over a hundred battles. Sergeant le Boehm was a tough and merciless professional soldier. The Sergeant wielded an iron discipline that molded the Legionnaires into a force Paul could lead to victory after victory. With the keen supervision of the Sergeant and the masterful leadership of the Lieutenant, now, no desert force was equal to them.

Unlike Captain Ourain the men invested their trust in Paul, and like the true officer Paul basked in it. His strength came from their open worship. His approval was crisp and heady to them.

His family would never understand. His father and father’s father all officers, all military courtiers, who had never known blood, the feel of a man’s life in their hands. He profaned them with his embrace of a combat command. His father couldn’t understand the secret of his change. His family couldn’t understand how he would choose the action of Tunisia over the promotions of Paris.

His parent’s letters came to him monthly. They begged him to return and spoke of sentiments and events he could barely understand anymore. His mother wrote of emotions Paul thought he could never know again. His life had become centered in one thing, the Foreign Legion and the responsibilities of command.

Paul could congratulate himself. He brought the esteem of his men up to a heady and overwhelming point. They were interested now in success and not just survival. He brought their battle loses down to nearly zero and increased their training to a fever pitch. They were a capable fighting force, now feared by the bandits and for once respected by the Tunisian and nomadic peoples who lived in the wastes surrounding the Chott Melrhir and Chott Djerid.

Paul was proud of his men and proud of himself. His family was foolish to try to tempt him to return to Paris; this was his environment. It was the essence of his self.

Paul Bolang is an archetype of a perfect military officer. He is dedicated to his profession and his way of life like few men. In this itself it should be obvious he is a Romantic character. Almost all archetypes are Romantic characters. Further, there is much more to Paul Bolang than what I gove in this short piece from the novel; however, it should also be self-evident that Paul Bolang is in opposition to his culture and society. Paul’s father found him a safe garrison command in Paris, Paul chose to go the French Foreign Legion in Tunisia. Paul’s father was a military courtier, Paul is wholly a military professional. Paul’s father is a man of genteel quality. Paul is a leader of men. Paul is in direct opposition to the norms of his father’s and mother’s culture and society. This is a further indication that Paul is a Romantic character. Paul is not a pathetic character and can’t be made one. His is too powerful as a man and as a person. You can’t feel sorry for a man like Paul Bolang. You can admire him.

Paul is a great example of a Romantic character. This is the type of character that most readers love. All Romantic characters have faults some more prominent than others, and all protagonists have a telic flaw that drives them and the novel. An author can never forget this.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 930, Publishing, Protagonists, Example: Centurion

21 January 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 930, Publishing, Protagonists, Example: Centurion

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Would you like to write a novel that a publisher will consider? Would you like to write a novel that is published? How about one that sells?

Centurion was published by then Capstone which became Oaktara publishing in 2008. Centurion is a novel about the Centurion Abenadar who led the crucifixion of Christ. This novel is unique in that it looks at the Roman point of view and to a degree, the Jewish point of view.  The protagonist is Abenadar. Here is the physical description of Adenadar:

Naomi’s son, Abenadar grew quickly and straight. Abenadar was known as Able to the people of Natzeret. Most had forgotten his origins, or they didn’t care anymore. He had the cast of a boy of the Galil with the face of a Roman. His eyes were gray and filled his features with a constant sober appearance. Even as a child, he was given to a fixed and disconcerting gaze that many times took his opponents by surprise. Abenadar’s mind and limbs were fit and strong. At 17 he did a man’s work—when he could find it. Alone, no one bothered him, and he had long ago shown the boy’s of Natzeret that even a group was not a good match against the child of Naomi of the hill. When they tried to beat him, he out ran them and picked them off one by one. They gave up their persecution of him early and let him join, an unwelcome and always isolated playmate—never a friend. Except to Yeshua.

Abenadar is definitely a Romantic character. He can’t be made into a pathetic character. Later in the novel, Ruth, Abenadar’s live in becomes a pathos developing character, but Abenadar can’t be. Abenadar is the perfect Centurion. He is a man who thrives on military skills and military life. His only problem is his inheritance as a Roman and a Jew. Abeandar is intelligent, practiced in languages, skillful with weapons, and in leading men. He understands the problems Pilate faces and solves many of them.   In the sense of the times, Adenadar meets all the criteria for a perfect man. What makes him a Romantic character is that he is at odds with his own Jewish and Roman culture. He takes a Jewish whore to be his companion. He holds to the Jewish rites and blessings of his childhood. He is trusted by his master, the legatus and Pilate because he is a great tactician and strategizer. Abenadar is at odds with his Roman culture because he must kill his first friend Yeshua.

To see the power of a great Romantic character, Centurion is an excellent example. You can buy and read the novel. Not only that, you can gain perhaps the best historical view of the Legions and Roman military in the first century. The history in the novel is as perfect as our knowledge of the times can make it. Just look at the reviews.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 929, Publishing, Protagonists, Example: The Second Mission

20 January 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 929, Publishing, Protagonists, Example: The Second Mission

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Would you like to write a novel that a publisher will consider? Would you like to write a novel that is published? How about one that sells?

The Second Mission is my first novel. It is partner published by Xulon. A partner published novel is one that must meet a degree of publishing criteria, but where the author shares in the cost of publication. I did this because it was recommended to me. My current publisher would have likely published this novel, so I do regret publishing the novel this way. On the other hand, the publishing process taught me something about the current publication business. I learned something valuable, and I have the published novel. Unfortunately, it isn’t available electronically.

The protagonist of The Second Mission is Alan Fisher a nuclear scientist from the White Sands range in New Mexico. He is accidentally whisked back into the second mission into time. The description of Anan Fisher is provided in pieces in the novel. I provide revelation throughout concerning who he is—not as much about what he looks like. I hadn’t learned what I do now about description. Here is where he first describes himself.

“That I do know. I’m Alan Fisher from the Los Alamos nuclear lab. I’m a research engineer there.” He almost immediately regretted having given her so much information.

Alan Fisher is a man out of time. He is not in opposition to his new time as he is trying to become part of it—or at least hide within it. He is not really a Romantic character nor a pathetic character. He would be considered a normal archetype. The plot of the novel revolves around him, but the revelation is more his understanding of the times he lives in than of himself. There is some revelation of the man, Alan Fisher, but Alan Fisher is more of a character who sees and reports conditions and events around him. This approach produced a really fun novel, but it isn’t the way I write most of my novels today. The Second Mission was the ninth novel I finished writing. I’m not certain we can learn much about the development of a powerful protagonist from Alan Fisher. He is a normal protagonist from an exploration novel. He is more a conduit for the reader to assimilate the times of ancient Greece. I’ll move on to Centurion next.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 928, Publishing, more Powerful Protagonists

19 January 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 928, Publishing, more Powerful Protagonists

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Would you like to write a novel that a publisher will consider? Would you like to write a novel that is published? How about one that sells?

Since the novel is the revelation of the protagonist, to have a powerful novel, you need a powerful protagonist. I know that Romantic and pathetic protagonists are archetypes who generally lead to powerful protagonists, and thus to powerful novels. I’m not sure there are any other archetypes that create as reliable a protagonist as these two. As a writer or a reader, imagine your favorite characters. What makes them your favorites? Is it because you admire them? That usually indicates a Romantic character. Is it because you are emotionally touched by them? That usually indicates a pathetic character. I think I made an exploration of my protagonists before. Perhaps I didn’t approach them in exactly this manner.

What I plan to do next is look at my protagonists. You can read about them yourself for the first six novels. Beyond that, I’ll provide examples from my works. I’ll start with the description from the novel and give you more information—no spoilers. I’ll evaluate the type of protagonist and how she or he fits into the mold of Romantic and/or pathetic. I’ll give examples of how I developed these characters. Since at least eight novels are in publication or on contract, eight of the protagonist I evaluate are proven by publication to be reasonably developed characters.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 927, Publishing, Powerful Protagonists

18 January 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 927, Publishing, Powerful Protagonists

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Would you like to write a novel that a publisher will consider? Would you like to write a novel that is published? How about one that sells?

Think about your favorite protagonists. I already mentioned Romantic protagonists. These are usually people’s favorite characters and protagonists. There is more to favorite protagonists. One of my favorite protagonists is Trinka from Alison Pickrell’s As Eagles. Trinka is a girl child who was abandoned by her mother and left in an empty rental house. How can you not love Trinka. Trinka is a plain dirty kid who has almost nothing to eat but wants to become something. Her imagination is beautiful. She is a protagonist enveloped and developed in pathos. Trinka is a character who creates emotion just by existing. Pathos means an emotional argument in rhetoric and logic. Protagonists like Trinka are pathetic. The most powerful pathetic characters are girls or women. Men or boys can become pathetic characters, but usually the circumstances and not their existence govern the power of the pathos concerning a boy or men. In almost every culture and society, people expect men and boys to be self-sufficient. A hungry boy or man is equated with a lazy boy or man. On the other hand, a woman or girl is almost always viewed from the standpoint of pathos—the fact they are hungry can’t be attributed directly to them but to their circumstances. As I mentioned, a boy or man can be developed into a pathetic character, but they generally can’t begin as a pathetic character.

Other key elements of pathos are abuse, disfigurement, harm, denigration, and etc. So, a girl character who is abused, hungry, abandoned, in pain, and all, will create a very powerful pathetic character. I like to write using Romantic characters who are also pathos building. For example, I mentioned Valeska before. Valeska is my vampire girl. She is abandoned, hungry, abused, homeless, and alone. Even though she confesses that she is at fault for her condition and sin, she is still a powerful pathetic character. Also, Aksinya from the novel mentioned at the beginning of this blog is a powerful pathetic character. Although Aksinya is a sorceress who calls a demon from hell, she is a young woman who loses her family. She has nothing except her demon and her life. This is a powerfully pathetic and Romantic character.

Pathos is a powerful characteristic for a protagonist. You should consider these to be major elements of a strong protagonist.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 926, Publishing, more Romantic Protagonist

17 January 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 926, Publishing, more Romantic Protagonist

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Would you like to write a novel that a publisher will consider? Would you like to write a novel that is published? How about one that sells?

If you think back to your favorite novels, and your favorite protagonists in novels, you should find that most if not all are Romantic characters. Readers love Romantic characters. The reason is that Romantic characters represent the type of person everyone wants to be, and everyone likes to see them stick it to the man. Everyone wants to be like Sara Crew—the perfect aristocratic person. Everyone wants to be like Harry Potty—the powerful magician whom everyone admires. Everyone wants to be like Tarzan—the perfect self-sufficient jungle roamer who is the consummate aristocrat. Like I wrote, everyone wants to be like a Romantic character. The Romantic character is in opposition to his or her culture and society. In a comedy with a Romantic character, the protagonist wins over the cultural and social obstacles. In a tragedy with a Romantic character, the telic flaw of the cultural and social obstacles overcomes the protagonist. The most famous example of this is Les Miserables where Jean Valjean is crushed by the French revolution.

In a comedy novel with a Romantic protagonist, the protagonist sticks it to the culture and society. As I noted, this is one of the ways you can determine a Romantic novel. Everyone wants to act and achieve like a Romantic protagonist does. That’s why most readers love a Romantic protagonist. Ultimately, they are all too perfect and their achievements are usually personal and not universal, but that is what really makes a Romantic character an archetype. They are a little better than humans can ever be. In general, they represent how people want to see themselves and their world. I like Romantic protagonists. I recommend them as a way to produce a novel that might be considered, published, and sell.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 925, Publishing, Romantic Protagonist

16 January 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 925, Publishing, Romantic Protagonist

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

Would you like to write a novel that a publisher will consider? Would you like to write a novel that is published? How about one that sells?

Examples of Romantic and anti-Romantic characters? A Romantic character has special human moral and ethical skills and qualities that make him or her the perfection of a human. At the same time, the Romantic character is at odds with their culture and society because of their skills and qualities. The Anti-Romantic character has immoral or unethical characteristics that set him or her apart and is at odds with his or her culture or society because of it. If you say, morals and ethics are in the mind of the beholder, I will tell you I’m sorry you don’t understand morals, ethics, logic, or your culture very well. We all know exactly what it means to be moral and ethical in our cultures and societies—we must force ourselves to accept the immoral or unethical as moral and ethical.

Tarzan is a classic Romantic character. His special skills are his aristocracy, intelligence, wilderness skills… he is the truly noble savage. However, Tarzan is not savage. He is at odds with his society and culture because he would rather be out in the jungle eating raw meat rather than sitting in a drawing room sipping on tea. Unfortunately, ERB (Edgar Rice Burroughs) never tried to eat raw meat, or he would know what humans had to learn to cook and cut to eat meat. Oh well.

Another famous Romantic character is Howard Rourke. Howard Rourke is the protagonist in The Fountainhead. He is a premier architect, who designs buildings that people love. He only wants to go about his business of designing and building buildings, but he gets caught up in situations where his society and culture directly oppose him on artistic grounds.

Harry Potty is a Romantic character. His skill is survival and magic. He is the god of his age—the unkillable. However, the writer puts Harry at odds with his society and culture. Everyone except Harry is afraid of countering the evil Voldermort.

Sara Crew is a Romantic character. Her skill is that she is a princess even when she is poor. She acts like a princess and this sets her culture and society dead against her. One can’t act and be a princess when one is a scullery maid.

To have a successful character, I suggest writing a Romantic one. The Romantic character is an archetype human whose skills put them at odds with their society and culture. I don’t like anti-Romantic characters.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment