Writing – part x593, Developing Skills, How to Suspend Disbelief, Writing Reasonable Worldview

15 November 2018, Writing – part x593, Developing Skills, How to Suspend Disbelief, Writing Reasonable Worldview

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  TBD

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker         

Today:  Suspension of disbelief is the characteristic of writing that pulls the reader into the world of the novel in such a way that the reader would rather face the world of the novel rather than the real world—at least while reading.  If this occurs while not reading, it is potentially a mental problem.  To achieve the suspension of disbelief your writing has to meet some basic criteria and contain some strong inspiration.  If you want to call the inspiration creativity, that works too.  Here is a list of the basic criteria to hope to achieve some degree of suspension of disbelief.

  1. Reasonably written in standard English
  2. No glaring logical fallacies
  3. Reasoned worldview
  4. Creative and interesting topic
  5. A Plot
  6. Entertaining
  7. POV

Worldview is the most important feature of any fantasy, science fiction, or magical realism novel.  In fact, I could argue that worldview is the most important feature of every novel.

Novels that attempt to show the world of the time are a reflected worldview.  Novels that attempt to show the ideas of the time are a reproduced worldview.  Novels that build their own worldview are a created worldview.

How do we ensure the worldview doesn’t cast the reader out of the suspension of disbelief?  The problem becomes when the writer does not properly reflect or reproduce the worldview.

If you are reading this closely, you should note that the problem with either reproduced or reflected worldview is when the writer doesn’t get them straight—basically creating an aborted created worldview.  This usually occurs when the writer focuses or states questionable facts or makes unsupportable assertions without providing some basis for them.

For example, if I wrote a novel about vampires and stated that they had sparkly diamond-like skin, a vampire connoisseur would be knocked immediately out of the suspension of disbelief.  This is exactly what happened to me in the sparkly vampire novels.  I can’t read or watch the movies because the novel does not reflect or reproduce a consistent model of any classic or not so classic vampire.  To me the motivations, descriptions, and settings are silly, but we are talking about a young adult novel.  Young adults are less educated and probably don’t have a clue about classical vampires—Dracula was a novel assigned to them that they couldn’t and wouldn’t read.  But there’s more.

Any time an author does not properly reflect or reproduce the common worldview, this can be a problem.  To counter this, if the writer dos introduce a potentially controversial or questionable description or idea, they should prep the reader with some kind of reasoned and logical proof text.  Now, that doesn’t mean you need to write a technical paper, it means you need to write some type of explanation in the plot.  I can’t defend sparkly vampires.  I can introduce a reader to a lesser known mythological character or creature.  In general, when you reproduce a worldview, you need to research and know your worldview.

For example, I incorporated a dragon into one of my novels.  I studied classical mythology and ancient stories about dragons.  I used the descriptions directly out of the sources.  I stated some of my sources.  When I incorporated the demon Asmodeus in my novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Deamon, I used The Book of TobitThe Book of Solomon’s Wisdom, plus a host of medieval documents on Asmodeus and demons.  The novel is a reproduction of human knowledge about demons and sorcery as well as a reflection of the times 1917 to 1919.

As you write reflective or reproduced worldviews ensure your writing is truly reflective and reproductive of human knowledge and the world.  This is a critical aspect of these types of worldview.  Then there is a created worldview.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing – part x592, Developing Skills, How to Suspend Disbelief, Reasonable Worldview

14 November 2018, Writing – part x592, Developing Skills, How to Suspend Disbelief, Reasonable Worldview

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  TBD

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker         

Today:  Suspension of disbelief is the characteristic of writing that pulls the reader into the world of the novel in such a way that the reader would rather face the world of the novel rather than the real world—at least while reading.  If this occurs while not reading, it is potentially a mental problem.  To achieve the suspension of disbelief your writing has to meet some basic criteria and contain some strong inspiration.  If you want to call the inspiration creativity, that works too.  Here is a list of the basic criteria to hope to achieve some degree of suspension of disbelief.

  1. Reasonably written in standard English
  2. No glaring logical fallacies
  3. Reasoned worldview
  4. Creative and interesting topic
  5. A Plot
  6. Entertaining
  7. POV

Worldview is the most important feature of any fantasy, science fiction, or magical realism novel.  In fact, I could argue that worldview is the most important feature of every novel.

Novels that attempt to show the world of the time are a reflected worldview.  Novels that attempt to show the ideas of the time are a reproduced worldview.  Novels that build their own worldview are a created worldview.

How do we ensure the worldview doesn’t cast the reader out of the suspension of disbelief?

The author must reflect, reproduce, or create a reasoned worldview.  This is why I like to write novels that are a reproduced worldview.  A reproduced worldview looks like the real world as we know it, but includes ideas that are not necessarily accepted, but are acknowledged.  For example, I use mythical creatures in my reproduced worldview.  To design my mythical creatures, I don’t create them at all—I reproduce them from the myths and literature.  The literature I mean is classical literature not popular or insignificant literature.

My magic systems are based on acknowledged magical ideas—most specifically, I use the magical concepts defined by James Frazier’s Golden Bough.  If you didn’t know, James Frazier wrote an educated and well acknowledged treatise on magic and myth called The Golden Bough.  This is the know and accepted theory by which magic is supposed to operate.  It doesn’t matter that James Frazier’s purpose was to show how magic could not exist in the world.  His catalog of how magic works is the accepted view of the theory of magic.  I use this theory for the basis of the magic in my novels.  This basis allows for two types of magic.

If I use the reasoned and logical basis for magic (even if the overall concepts are illogical), then I don’t need to create a new basis for magic.  If I use the reflected (real) world for the worldview of my novel, I don’t need to create a worldview.  This means that a correctly written reflected or reproduced worldview is automatically reasoned.  The problem becomes when the writer does not properly reflect or reproduce the worldview.

We will address this next.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing – part x591, Developing Skills, How to Suspend Disbelief, Worldview Reflection, Creation, and Reproduction

13 November 2018, Writing – part x591, Developing Skills, How to Suspend Disbelief, Worldview Reflection, Creation, and Reproduction

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  TBD

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker         

Today:  Suspension of disbelief is the characteristic of writing that pulls the reader into the world of the novel in such a way that the reader would rather face the world of the novel rather than the real world—at least while reading.  If this occurs while not reading, it is potentially a mental problem.  To achieve the suspension of disbelief your writing has to meet some basic criteria and contain some strong inspiration.  If you want to call the inspiration creativity, that works too.  Here is a list of the basic criteria to hope to achieve some degree of suspension of disbelief.

  1. Reasonably written in standard English
  2. No glaring logical fallacies
  3. Reasoned worldview
  4. Creative and interesting topic
  5. A Plot
  6. Entertaining
  7. POV

Worldview is the most important feature of any fantasy, science fiction, or magical realism novel.  In fact, I could argue that worldview is the most important feature of every novel.

Novels that attempt to show the world of the time are a reflected worldview.  Novels that attempt to show the ideas of the time are a reproduced worldview.  Novels that build their own worldview are a created worldview.

The created worldview is, of course, science fiction, certain fantasy, and alternative world fiction.  A created worldview is one where the writer develops the world or entire universe from pieces of the reflected and reproduced, but then extrapolated and or interpolates to build an entirely different and created worldview.

I hope you are familiar with these types of novels.  Harry Potty is this type of novel.  The worldview of Harry Potty does not resemble any reproduced or reflected worldview—it is its own world and worldview.  The Sparkly Vampires are a created worldview—the vampires do not match any concept of mythical or literary vampire.  The Hungry Games is a created worldview.  In fact, as I noted, most all science fiction is a created worldview.  Alternative world or reality is obviously a created worldview.  Much of fantasy is created worldview, but there are some distinctions.

I would call most of my writing reproduced worldview.  I try to meld myth and known or believed ideas in my novels to the reflected worldview of the times.  For example, my vampires act like Bram Stoker’s vampires with just a few embellishments from other myth or literature.  My magic systems are based on James Frazier’s Golden Bough and other accepted ideas on magic.  I didn’t invent the magic systems in my novels, I reproduced the ideas that people have about them.  Likewise, my characters are based on what people know about myths and mythical beings.  If you can make a historical google search on your characters, settings, and events and find nonfiction based answers or historical answers, you are likely writing reproduced or reflected worldview.  If you can’t, you are in a created worldview.

Of course, my science fiction is all created worldview.  Just to be clear, created worldview is always based on the current reflected or reproduced worldview, but just extrapolated and or interpolated.  For example, most every author starts with their conception of the modern world and extrapolates that worldview to develop their science fiction universe.

The author of Harry Potty started with a reproduced modern worldview and then injected the interpolated magical system with all its stuff.  Many of the creatures are reproduced worldview.  Some are not.

With these basics of worldview, we can now discuss how to ensure the worldview doesn’t cast the reader out of the suspension of dis belief.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing – part x590, Developing Skills, How to Suspend Disbelief, Worldview

12 November 2018, Writing – part x590, Developing Skills, How to Suspend Disbelief, Worldview

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  TBD

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker         

Today:  Suspension of disbelief is the characteristic of writing that pulls the reader into the world of the novel in such a way that the reader would rather face the world of the novel rather than the real world—at least while reading.  If this occurs while not reading, it is potentially a mental problem.  To achieve the suspension of disbelief your writing has to meet some basic criteria and contain some strong inspiration.  If you want to call the inspiration creativity, that works too.  Here is a list of the basic criteria to hope to achieve some degree of suspension of disbelief.

  1. Reasonably written in standard English
  2. No glaring logical fallacies
  3. Reasoned worldview
  4. Creative and interesting topic
  5. A Plot
  6. Entertaining
  7. POV

Worldview is the most important feature of any fantasy, science fiction, or magical realism novel.  In fact, I could argue that worldview is the most important feature of every novel.

Every novel reflects, creates, or reproduces a certain worldview.  For example, the early Victorian Era novels reflected their worldview.  There is always a question if the reflection of the worldview of Dickens truly matched the actual world of the Victorian poor, their world, and environs.  This is a typical problem for historical and classical literature.  How well does the wealthy, educated, and privileged author reflect the world and worldview of the world they don’t know or live in?  The answer is simple—as long as their worldview is reasoned and logical, it will add to the suspension of disbelief.  Here is a direct example.  I recently read a novel from the Victorian Era about factory life and people.  At first the novel kicked me out of the suspension of disbelief because it gave a very rosy view of the factory and people working in the factories in the Victorian Era.  This set me back a little.  I was confused and held some level of unbelief about the setting of the novel.  After some reflection, I came to the conclusion that the view was likely a specific opinion of a person who might have knowledge and direct experience, but who was trying to reflect a certain position and perhaps an accurate reflection from a certain standpoint.  In any case, here is a novel that is historical, written in and about a specific time and place with a reasoned worldview, but that a real and actual reflection from the point of view of the times caused me to be knocked out of the narrative.  This is potentially a problem we need to look at.

Here is another point from the Victorian Era.  Dickens also wrote the novel, A Christmas Carol.  This novel can be considered to reproduce or create a certain worldview.  There are no ghosts in the real world.  Dickens’ characters are equally caricatures—they are not real.  The ideas, however, were not created.  The ideas were not reflected.  They were reproduced from the ideas of a certain worldview prevalent and accepted in the Victorian Era.  In fact, this worldview is prevalent and accepted, to some degree, in our time.  There are no ghosts, but the idea of ghosts and of the supernatural in A Christmas Carol are a reproduction of a popular mythical view of the world.  It isn’t real, but it is an accepted worldview.  It is a reasonable worldview, although it isn’t really reflective or logical.  A reasonable and accepted worldview can be used to construct a novel.  We need to discuss this too.

Then there is worldview creation.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing – part x589, Developing Skills, How to Suspend Disbelief, Place and Logic Issues

11 November 2018, Writing – part x589, Developing Skills, How to Suspend Disbelief, Place and Logic Issues

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  TBD

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker         

Today:  Suspension of disbelief is the characteristic of writing that pulls the reader into the world of the novel in such a way that the reader would rather face the world of the novel rather than the real world—at least while reading.  If this occurs while not reading, it is potentially a mental problem.  To achieve the suspension of disbelief your writing has to meet some basic criteria and contain some strong inspiration.  If you want to call the inspiration creativity, that works too.  Here is a list of the basic criteria to hope to achieve some degree of suspension of disbelief.

  1. Reasonably written in standard English
  2. No glaring logical fallacies
  3. Reasoned worldview
  4. Creative and interesting topic
  5. A Plot
  6. Entertaining
  7. POV

We know that subtle logical issues will not knock the reader out of a strong suspension of disbelief.  Then what should we be looking for in our writing?

Logical issues come in three varieties: worldview, time, and place.

We looked at worldview to a degree, and we looked at time.  Let’s delve into place today.

I’m a time and place snob.  I want my writing to be accurate about times and place.  I intend my writing to be accurate as perfectly as possible in terms of time and place.  What I mean by this is I want all the historical incidents in time and place and all the places to be as real as possible.

I study history.  I study places.  I visit places.  All with the purpose of making everything in my novels as accurate as possible.  My science fiction is different, but I still use real places as models to make the writing and the descriptions as accurate as possible.

When I write a modern novel set in the real world (as opposed to a science fiction novel), I always use real places and real time incidents in the setting of the times.  For example, I set Khoine: Enchantment and the Fox at Boston University.  I used real buildings and incidents from the time to populate my novel.  When I needed a restaurant, I used one the area—a popular one with the students.  When I needed a place for my protagonist’s parents to live, I found a place through google maps that would look like and be near the exact place I intended.  Now, I did make the interior and the exterior a little different to meet the needs of my novel, but the place, streets, and locations are real.  You can drive to them.  The descriptions are exact and close until you actually get to the house.

When I need a restaurant, I use the actual restaurant, menus, interior, and etc.  The reason is that a restaurant is a public space.  I don’t see any reason to not be as real as possible.  I would like my readers to read my novels, go to the restaurant, and say, “I’ve been here, through a book.”  The same for places like a university or municipal building.  As I noted, for public spaces I use exact places and interiors.  For private spaces, I usually use an imagined interior, but based on a real building or space.

You actually don’t have to go to this level of detail.  Place is even less of an issue than time.  In general, unless your readers are super familiar with an area, they won’t notice large or small issues.  They will notice huge issues.  For example, if you put a country in the wrong place, a capital in the wrong place, an institution in the wrong place.  For example, if you state that your protagonist works in the CIA headquartered in San Francisco, or that the US capital is in Georgia, your readers will balk unless you explain why we are working in a science fiction or a alternative history setting.  Alternative history settings are acceptable, but you need to explain the whys and wherefores.  Most any setting, idea, or worldview is acceptable in a novel, but you have to tell your readers the whys.

I like to use real places and times in my settings—some authors do not.  I advise you to use real places and times in your historical settings.  This makes description easier and sets the novel solidly in the real world.  Most readers appreciate this.  You can point out real places, and the real incidents in the world can become turning points and critical elements in your plots.

I try to make my places, spaces, and times match the real world.  I recommend it.  This isn’t as critical as logic in the worldview which we will look at from an overall standpoint and not just logical issues.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing – part x588, Developing Skills, How to Suspend Disbelief, More Logic Issues

10 November 2018, Writing – part x588, Developing Skills, How to Suspend Disbelief, More Logic Issues

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  TBD

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker         

Today:  Suspension of disbelief is the characteristic of writing that pulls the reader into the world of the novel in such a way that the reader would rather face the world of the novel rather than the real world—at least while reading.  If this occurs while not reading, it is potentially a mental problem.  To achieve the suspension of disbelief your writing has to meet some basic criteria and contain some strong inspiration.  If you want to call the inspiration creativity, that works too.  Here is a list of the basic criteria to hope to achieve some degree of suspension of disbelief.

  1. Reasonably written in standard English
  2. No glaring logical fallacies
  3. Reasoned worldview
  4. Creative and interesting topic
  5. A Plot
  6. Entertaining
  7. POV

We know that subtle logical issues will not knock the reader out of a strong suspension of disbelief.  Then what should we be looking for in our writing?

Logical issues come in three varieties: worldview, time, and place.

We looked at worldview to a degree.  Let’s delve into time and place today.

Time issues can and usually are subtle.  However, there are ways to help prevent them.  In my novel, not yet published and was on contract until my publisher bit the dust, Sister of Darkness, there was a missing year that I didn’t discover, my prepub readers didn’t notice, my editor didn’t discover, but another publishing company editor accidentally found.  I corrected the problem with a paragraph to make the time pass, but it was an inadvertent and subtle timing issue.

The reason it was a problem is that the novel is set in the real world during WWII and all the time, place, and incidents needed to line up.  I think the novel could have been published with few the wiser, but since an editor caught it, it needed to be fixed.  What was funny is my prepub readers swore it wasn’t there.  It was a real subtle time issue.

Subtle time and place issues aren’t the kind of issues we are talking about.  I’ll outline another subtle time issue.  I’ve used this example before.  In Dragonsong, the song Menoly wrote could not have been found by the new harper in her seahold—not based on the timing and incidents outlined in the text.  This song becomes a plot point (creative element) in the next novel Dragonsinger and is the implied plot point (creative element) in the first novel on which the climax hinges.  The time issue is subtle enough that you won’t catch it until your second or third reading of the novels.  That’s my point entirely, subtle worldview, time, and place issues will usually not knock the reader out of a suspension of disbelief.  Editors might not catch them either.

However, not so subtle time, worldview, and place issues will definitely knock the reader out of the suspension of disbelief.  These issues will usually get caught by an editor and a publisher and will usually result in the rejection of your manuscript.  How do you prevent them.

Time issues are prevented through the use of a time outline.  I am in the habit of writing the date, place, and day at the top of every chapter.  My publisher suggested this for my Ancient Light novels and it kind of stuck for my other novels.  I think it is a great technique and style for historically based authors like me.  I recommend for very tightly wound novels, identify each day, week, month, and year in the text and then remove them in the final editing—if you wish.  I find that readers like this kind of time identification.

I have been personally kicked out of the suspension of disbelief by novels where the time and place are left ambiguous.  I want to know exactly when it is.  Now, some novels intentionally use time ambiguity—this is alright if played correctly.  You must realize if you use this technique, you might irritate your readers.

Time ambiguity is great, but you should somehow identify the correct passing of time from some set beginning.  As an author, you must do this to prevent timing issues.  You should do this to appease your readers.  Once set, you don’t need to give the readers a time clock—I like to, but you don’t have to.  As long as the timing is correct and you set the time in the scenes.

You must set time in every scene.  I like to set time additionally at the beginning of each chapter, but that’s my style.  You must set the time at the beginning of every scene.  Do this and you and your readers will never be disappointed.  I’ll repeat, you must set time at the beginning of every scene.  See the scene development outline above.

You must also set the place.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing – part x587, Developing Skills, How to Suspend Disbelief, Preventing Logic Issues

9 November 2018, Writing – part x587, Developing Skills, How to Suspend Disbelief, Preventing Logic Issues

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but my primary publisher has gone out of business—they couldn’t succeed in the past business and publishing environment.  I’ll keep you informed, but I need a new publisher.  More information can be found atwww.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels–I think you’ll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning withhttp://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

  1. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
  3. Research as required
  4. Develop the initial setting
  5. Develop the characters
  6. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  7. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  8. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  9. Write the climax scene
  10. Write the falling action scene(s)
  11. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 29th novel, working title, Detective, potential titleBlue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.  The theme statement is: Lady Azure Rose Wishart, the Chancellor of the Fae, supernatural detective, and all around dangerous girl, finds love, solves cases, breaks heads, and plays golf.

Here is the cover proposal for Blue Rose: Enchantment and the Detective.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I am continuing to write on my 30thnovel, working title Red Sonja.  I finished my 29th novel, working titleDetective.  I’m planning to start on number 31, working title Shifter.

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

For novel 30:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

For novel 31:  TBD

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker         

Today:  Suspension of disbelief is the characteristic of writing that pulls the reader into the world of the novel in such a way that the reader would rather face the world of the novel rather than the real world—at least while reading.  If this occurs while not reading, it is potentially a mental problem.  To achieve the suspension of disbelief your writing has to meet some basic criteria and contain some strong inspiration.  If you want to call the inspiration creativity, that works too.  Here is a list of the basic criteria to hope to achieve some degree of suspension of disbelief.

  1. Reasonably written in standard English
  2. No glaring logical fallacies
  3. Reasoned worldview
  4. Creative and interesting topic
  5. A Plot
  6. Entertaining
  7. POV

We know that subtle logical issues will not knock the reader out of a strong suspension of disbelief.  Then what should we be looking for in our writing?

Logical issues come in three varieties: worldview, time, and place.

We will look at the reasoned worldview in great detail, but the characteristic that really affects the suspension of disbelief is an unreasonable worldview.  The most glaring comes out of science fiction and fantasy.  For example, a magical system that the writer manipulates illogically to provide a problem resolution, or a science system (or idea) that the author changes to resolve an issue.

These aren’t as unusual as you might think.  The trick in all writing is to develop any novel to the climax.  The climax is the resolution of the telic flaw.  Every author needs to realize the telic flaw resolution must be the expected/unexpected.  This is sometimes misidentified as a surprise ending or climax.  In other words, every novel is expected to have some type of surprise climax.

Think about this.  The expectation of the expected/unexpected is that the telic flaw will be resolved in the climax, but the means is unexpected.  In fact, if the author plays it right, the expected resolution looks impossible, but then within the context of the novel, becomes obvious in the climax—the unexpected.  Most fantasy and many science fiction novels manipulate the rules of the world to provide this unexpected climax.  In Harry Potty, the system of magic allows the protagonist and the protagonist’s helpers to resolve the climax in every case.  In the first novel, the magical stone which is the focus of the novel, a magical mirror (the obsession of the protagonist), and the special magical characteristic of the protagonist all entwine to provide the resolution.  Bringing three elements together in an unexpected fashion is a typical resolution means in many novels.  None of these ideas, stone, mirror, magic, are true in the real world.  They are constructions in the world of Harry Potty.  If the author did not provide a resolution of the issues in the novel that matched the magical system, the reader would immediately note the discontinuity and be knocked out of the suspension of disbelief.

Now, the writer of Harry Potty wisely chose a very simple and unexplained magic system—with it the author can do almost anything.  The logical fallacies with such an inexplicable system come not with the elements, but with the spells themselves.  One of the greatest is why the bad dudes don’t just use the banned and ultimate curses to blast everyone to he double toothpicks.  The reader just overlooks this gross logical fallacy, but it’s there for adults to wonder about and to be knocked out of the suspension of disbelief.

The usual child’s response to this fallacy is to assume the world isn’t that bad, but any adult can see that the bad guys are really bad.  Why really bad people would not use their very bad spells to just wipe out the good guys, only suspension of disbelief can tell.

The other large logical fallacy in Harry Potty is also related to the use of spells.  For example, with the ability to use the flue spell, the portal spell, or just plain old teleportation, why would they need to ride on brooms, magical trains, or endanger themselves in any other fashion?  The answer is the writer misused her own magical system to provide plot elements for entertainment and to provide situations for her scenes.

This type of manipulation would never be acceptable in an adult novel, but it makes for a great kid’s book as well as great movie effects.  Many movies have this problem, but the plot moves so quickly from point to point that most of the viewers don’t get the logical inconsistencies and aren’t knocked out of the suspension of disbelief.

This problem of worldview is not just a problem of fantasy and magic.  Science fiction is also very susceptible.  Most of the Star Bores movies are so filled with science inconsistencies and logical fallacy, they are hard for me, as a scientist, to watch.  If I ignore the science and just pretend Star Bores is all magic, it works better for me, but readers might or might not be so generous.

We haven’t discussed basic logical issues.  These are ones related to obvious worldview inconsistencies and fallacies.  The reason is that most of these problems won’t ever get past a publisher or editor.  You will find them rampant in self-published works, but not usually in any professionally published novels.

These are pure errors in logic concerning the actions and reactions of the real world.  For example, if a person is hit with a bullet in the real world, they are injured and have a high probability of death.  Is it only in the movies where people can be shot multiple times and still keep firing, fighting, and winning.  This won’t usually float in any novel, but people lap it up in movies.  This is a real world inconsistency.

More obvious issues are related to time and place.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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