Writing – part x198, Novel Form – Japan day 11

16 October 2017, Writing – part x198, Novel Form – Japan day 11

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
  5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 28th novel, working title, School, potential title Deirdre: Enchantment and the School. The theme statement is: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

Here is the cover proposal for Deirdre: Enchantment and the School.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I continued writing my 29th novel, working title Red Sonja. I finished my 28th novel, working title School. If you noticed, I started on number 28, but finished number 29 (in the starting sequence—it’s actually higher than that). I adjusted the numbering. I do keep everything clear in my records. I’ll be providing information on the marketing materials and editing.

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 29: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

This is the classical form for writing a successful novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters (protagonist, antagonist, and optionally the protagonist’s helper)
    4. Identify the telic flaw of the protagonist (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

The protagonist and the telic flaw are tied permanently together. The novel plot is completely dependent on the protagonist and the protagonist’s telic flaw. They are inseparable. This is likely the most critical concept about any normal (classical) form novel.

Here are the parts of a normal (classical) novel:

  1. The Initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  2. The Rising action scenes
  3. The Climax scene
  4. The Falling action scene(s)
  5. The Dénouement scene

So, how do you write a rich and powerful initial scene? Let’s start from a theme statement. Here is an example from my latest novel:

The theme statement for Deirdre: Enchantment and the School is: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

If you have the characters (protagonist, protagonist’s helper, and antagonist), the initial setting, the telic flaw (from the protagonist), a plot idea, the theme action, then you are ready to write the initial scene. I would state that since you have a protagonist, the telic flaw, a plot idea, and the theme action, you have about everything—what you might be lacking is the tension and release cycle in the initial scene.

Tension and release is the means to success in scene writing. The creative elements you introduce into the scenes (Chekov’s guns) are the catalysts that drive entertainment and excitement in a scene, and this is what scenes are all about.

I am moving into the way to develop sufficient tension and release. One of the best means is through pathos. I’ve written about pathos developing characters. What I want to do is expand this into pathos developing scenes. In most cases, a scene with a pathos developing character can be made pathetic. In any case, almost any scene can invoke pathos—pity and fear. This development of pity and fear is the driving force in tension and release. The question is how the author develops it.

I’m in Tokyo Japan—this isn’t a travel log, but I might find some examples to put here.

I’m not writing a travel blog, and I already have a hit and miss food, drink, and cigar blog, but I thought it might be fun to give some direct reporting from the Land of the Rising Sun.

Day eleven in Japan. We made it back from our long trip to Yokohama, Hiroshima, and Kyoto. We came back with souvenirs in hand, but we weren’t done with the hunting or the buying. On day eleven, we were back ready for an overnight road trip. First step was souvenirs.

We went to a shrine sale. You need some connections to hit the shrine sales, but this is the place to get your “real” Japanese souvenirs. We wanted a real tea ceremony set (serving bowl, discard bowl, bamboo dipper, tea whisk, and tea box) all in a box. We found it, antique for 3500 yen. That’s $30. I wanted a calligraphy set with all the stuff. I found one for 1000 yen ($9). We purchased a regular tea set. We bought obis. We walked out of the shrine sale with bags of great stuff for almost nothing.

The antique shops are also a good place to get inexpensive but great souvenirs. I bought old sake cups for my friends for 200 yen each. My wife bought silk obis for her friends for about 300 yen each. There are even better deals.

On to the road trip. We traveled by car to Nagano to the Kokuya Ryokan there. We had reservations for their best room. The best rooms have their own outdoor onsens. An onsen is a hot mineral water bath. If you stay at the Ryokan, you can use their many separate baths, private baths, and if you have a room with an outdoor bath, you can use that too. Additionally, all down the street are other onsens which you can bath in.

When you go to the Ryokan, they give you each a yakata, socks, and an obi. You put these on and never take them off, except to bathe. In the Ryokan, that’s what you do, bathe, eat, bathe, walk around the town, bathe, eat, have tea, drink sake, and did I mention bathe? This is a very pleasant opportunity. The point of the Ryokan is relaxation. That’s just what you do—relax. That’s what we did. You also go see the snow monkeys. It wasn’t winter, and I didn’t care to see monkeys. I was into relaxing. While we are relaxing, I need to tell you about the meals.

The first meal is dinner. They ring your phone and remind you about your dinner time. We went down to our own little dining room—in yukatas of course. The table was filled with food. When I say filled, it was filled. That was just the appetizer—the courses started soon afterward. There is no way you can eat all the food and it keeps coming and coming. All of it, in my mind is pleasant. It is different, but that is what makes it so wonderful. Afterward, you find the futons set up in your room, and you bathe. You bathe, drink sake, and bathe some more. Then you go to sleep, on a futon, on the floor, over a tatami mat. This is wonderful Japanese living.

In the morning, you start with a bath. I should describe. You get the instructions, but when you bathe, first, you rinse and wash off your hair and body. You have a hand shower and stuff right outside your bath. After you are clean, then you get into the bath. At breakfast time, the phone rings to remind you to come down to your dining room—then the food begins. Breakfast isn’t the gut buster of dinner, but you have more food and more different food than you can stand. You can do the Japanese or the Western breakfasts. Either is more food than you can handle. Three of us did the Japanese breakfast. It is worth seeing and tasting. Even if you don’t like everything, there is a magic in experiencing the way of the Ryokan.

Eventually everything has to come to an end. We traded our yukatas for our regular clothing and went to pay our bill. The entire inn showed up to see us off. There were pictures and bowing and thanking. They brought our car up to the place and there we were headed out and back to Fussa via Matsumoto Castle.

End of day eleven.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing – part x197, Novel Form – Japan day 10

15 October 2017, Writing – part x197, Novel Form – Japan day 10

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
  5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 28th novel, working title, School, potential title Deirdre: Enchantment and the School. The theme statement is: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

Here is the cover proposal for Deirdre: Enchantment and the School.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I continued writing my 29th novel, working title Red Sonja. I finished my 28th novel, working title School. If you noticed, I started on number 28, but finished number 29 (in the starting sequence—it’s actually higher than that). I adjusted the numbering. I do keep everything clear in my records. I’ll be providing information on the marketing materials and editing.

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 29: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

This is the classical form for writing a successful novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters (protagonist, antagonist, and optionally the protagonist’s helper)
    4. Identify the telic flaw of the protagonist (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

The protagonist and the telic flaw are tied permanently together. The novel plot is completely dependent on the protagonist and the protagonist’s telic flaw. They are inseparable. This is likely the most critical concept about any normal (classical) form novel.

Here are the parts of a normal (classical) novel:

  1. The Initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  2. The Rising action scenes
  3. The Climax scene
  4. The Falling action scene(s)
  5. The Dénouement scene

So, how do you write a rich and powerful initial scene? Let’s start from a theme statement. Here is an example from my latest novel:

The theme statement for Deirdre: Enchantment and the School is: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

If you have the characters (protagonist, protagonist’s helper, and antagonist), the initial setting, the telic flaw (from the protagonist), a plot idea, the theme action, then you are ready to write the initial scene. I would state that since you have a protagonist, the telic flaw, a plot idea, and the theme action, you have about everything—what you might be lacking is the tension and release cycle in the initial scene.

Tension and release is the means to success in scene writing. The creative elements you introduce into the scenes (Chekov’s guns) are the catalysts that drive entertainment and excitement in a scene, and this is what scenes are all about.

I am moving into the way to develop sufficient tension and release. One of the best means is through pathos. I’ve written about pathos developing characters. What I want to do is expand this into pathos developing scenes. In most cases, a scene with a pathos developing character can be made pathetic. In any case, almost any scene can invoke pathos—pity and fear. This development of pity and fear is the driving force in tension and release. The question is how the author develops it.

I’m in Tokyo Japan—this isn’t a travel log, but I might find some examples to put here.

I’m not writing a travel blog, and I already have a hit and miss food, drink, and cigar blog, but I thought it might be fun to give some direct reporting from the Land of the Rising Sun.

Day ten in Japan, and we are still on our long trip. Still in Kyoto. We left our Air BnB for the mountains and the mountain shrines. Specifically, we were headed for Higashiyama-Ku and the other mountain shrines. This shrine is under reconstruction, but you can still see all of it. The trails are fun, and you definitely need to see the lover’s rocks, the Shinto shrine above the Buddhist main one, and the waterfall. There are unusual statues, a huge pagoda, and a whole shrine festival on the climb up. Pictures are the theme of the day. You can get so many NG (National Geographic) shots, you will be amazed.

Next, we went back down the mountain to Kujocho. This is the famous pagoda of five levels. You can go into the bottom, but we didn’t. It’s no fun if you can’t go up. Around this site are numerous other temples and shrines. Many are very old—they haven’t burned down yet.

I should mention, in Kyoto, we found a working beer street vending machine. We had to each get a beer for the road from it. We took pictures too. I should also mention, you can get sake in juice boxes and sake for the road in the Family Marts, 7/11s, and Sunco Marts. Don’t miss all the many convivial opportunities in this wonderful country.

We headed back to the train station in Kyoto to get our Shinkansen back to Tokyo. When we arrived back at Fussa, we decided it was curry night. Japanese curry is one of the gastronomical and cultural events you must try. We went to the famous CocoCurry. Cocos has more curry than I can describe, but you choose the type, the fire (heat), the meat, and the rice. Japanese curry always comes with rice. The plate is half curry and half rice—that’s just the way it is, and it is delicious (oiisious, in Japanese). I have to say, I haven’t eaten anything I didn’t really enjoy in Japan. We were back in Fussa and in our beds.

End of day ten.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing – part x196, Novel Form – Japan day 9

14 October 2017, Writing – part x196, Novel Form – Japan day 9

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
  5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 28th novel, working title, School, potential title Deirdre: Enchantment and the School. The theme statement is: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

Here is the cover proposal for Deirdre: Enchantment and the School.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I continued writing my 29th novel, working title Red Sonja. I finished my 28th novel, working title School. If you noticed, I started on number 28, but finished number 29 (in the starting sequence—it’s actually higher than that). I adjusted the numbering. I do keep everything clear in my records. I’ll be providing information on the marketing materials and editing.

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 29: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

This is the classical form for writing a successful novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters (protagonist, antagonist, and optionally the protagonist’s helper)
    4. Identify the telic flaw of the protagonist (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

The protagonist and the telic flaw are tied permanently together. The novel plot is completely dependent on the protagonist and the protagonist’s telic flaw. They are inseparable. This is likely the most critical concept about any normal (classical) form novel.

Here are the parts of a normal (classical) novel:

  1. The Initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  2. The Rising action scenes
  3. The Climax scene
  4. The Falling action scene(s)
  5. The Dénouement scene

So, how do you write a rich and powerful initial scene? Let’s start from a theme statement. Here is an example from my latest novel:

The theme statement for Deirdre: Enchantment and the School is: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

If you have the characters (protagonist, protagonist’s helper, and antagonist), the initial setting, the telic flaw (from the protagonist), a plot idea, the theme action, then you are ready to write the initial scene. I would state that since you have a protagonist, the telic flaw, a plot idea, and the theme action, you have about everything—what you might be lacking is the tension and release cycle in the initial scene.

Tension and release is the means to success in scene writing. The creative elements you introduce into the scenes (Chekov’s guns) are the catalysts that drive entertainment and excitement in a scene, and this is what scenes are all about.

I am moving into the way to develop sufficient tension and release. One of the best means is through pathos. I’ve written about pathos developing characters. What I want to do is expand this into pathos developing scenes. In most cases, a scene with a pathos developing character can be made pathetic. In any case, almost any scene can invoke pathos—pity and fear. This development of pity and fear is the driving force in tension and release. The question is how the author develops it.

I’m in Tokyo Japan—this isn’t a travel log, but I might find some examples to put here.

I’m not writing a travel blog, and I already have a hit and miss food, drink, and cigar blog, but I thought it might be fun to give some direct reporting from the Land of the Rising Sun.

Day nine in Japan, and we are still on our long trip. Still in Kyoto. You must spend at least two days in Kyoto. Just like Tokyo, there is so much to see. First stop of the day is the Kinaku-ji Temple, also called the Golden Palace. This is a shrine, temple, and summer home. It’s the famous retirement house of one of the famous Shogunate leaders. A crazy monk burned it down in 1956, but it was rebuilt. This is so typical of Japanese buildings—they burn down and are rebuilt. You can almost bet on it. The building is beautiful, and you can get wonderful NG (National Geographic) shots everywhere. Since it is a shrine, you can also get your enma (shrine board souvenir).

From the golden palace, we went to the original Imperial Palace. You can’t go inside, but you can see inside and you can walk all around. You can also get your stamps. This is a really worthwhile place to visit. Make sure you go on a day when it is open. From the Imperial Palace, we took a taxi to Fire Ramen for lunch.

Fire Ramen is the place to see for “Fire Ramen.” I ain’t kidding. They make ramen and pour burning oil on top of it. You have to put on a bib, an apron, sit back, and be ready. When the burning oil goes on the fresh shallots on the ramen, it literally explodes. Oil and fire go everywhere. You and your clothing are protected, but watch out for missing eyebrows. The ramen has a taste that is hard to describe. It’s Fire Ramen. Pretty typical, but the show and the special flavor are worth it.

From Fire Ramen, we went to Nijo Castle. I think we eventually saw all the standing castles in Japan. I know we saw the best. Nijo Castle is worth the visit, and so is the Heian Shrine.

On our way to dinner we hit the big souvenir place. I told you I would tell you the secret of souvenirs in Japan. The first is the enma boards. You can’t go wrong—they are unique and relatively cheap. The stuff you really want like tea sets, sake sets, kimonos, yukatas, obis, and other kool Japanese stuff will cost you a pretty penny if you try to buy it new. The Japanese don’t go for old stuff—they sell or give it away and it ends up in second hand stores all over the place. We are talking about more than 50 to 90 percent off of the original cost. The Japanese take such good care of their stuff, most of these second hand items are like brand new. There are department stores for second hand called Hard-Off, Hobby-Off, Office-Off, Book-Off, and etc. We found a big Book-Off in Kyoto on the way to dinner. I literally found something I wanted that was like new, with the box, and at least 50% less than the original cost. You can find all kinds of deals like this. This is why I said for you not to buy your Ghibli souvenirs at the Ghibli Museum—you can buy them for 50% less at the nearest Hard-Off.

Additionally, the other places to buy your really kool pure Japanese souvenirs are at antique stores, second hand stores, and shrine sales. I’ll talk about them later.

We made out way to Toma Sushi in the Gion district for sushi. This is the top rated sushi in Kyoto. We went up stairs and sat on the tatami mats and ordered all kinds of great sushi. I had the nigari selection and it was great. Toma Sushi is down a back alley, but worth the trip, and when you exit, you can take all kinds of great night shots in Gion Kyoto.

End of day nine.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing – part x195, Novel Form – Japan day 8

13 October 2017, Writing – part x195, Novel Form – Japan day 8

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
  5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 28th novel, working title, School, potential title Deirdre: Enchantment and the School. The theme statement is: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

Here is the cover proposal for Deirdre: Enchantment and the School.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I continued writing my 29th novel, working title Red Sonja. I finished my 28th novel, working title School. If you noticed, I started on number 28, but finished number 29 (in the starting sequence—it’s actually higher than that). I adjusted the numbering. I do keep everything clear in my records. I’ll be providing information on the marketing materials and editing.

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 29: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

This is the classical form for writing a successful novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters (protagonist, antagonist, and optionally the protagonist’s helper)
    4. Identify the telic flaw of the protagonist (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

The protagonist and the telic flaw are tied permanently together. The novel plot is completely dependent on the protagonist and the protagonist’s telic flaw. They are inseparable. This is likely the most critical concept about any normal (classical) form novel.

Here are the parts of a normal (classical) novel:

  1. The Initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  2. The Rising action scenes
  3. The Climax scene
  4. The Falling action scene(s)
  5. The Dénouement scene

So, how do you write a rich and powerful initial scene? Let’s start from a theme statement. Here is an example from my latest novel:

The theme statement for Deirdre: Enchantment and the School is: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

If you have the characters (protagonist, protagonist’s helper, and antagonist), the initial setting, the telic flaw (from the protagonist), a plot idea, the theme action, then you are ready to write the initial scene. I would state that since you have a protagonist, the telic flaw, a plot idea, and the theme action, you have about everything—what you might be lacking is the tension and release cycle in the initial scene.

Tension and release is the means to success in scene writing. The creative elements you introduce into the scenes (Chekov’s guns) are the catalysts that drive entertainment and excitement in a scene, and this is what scenes are all about.

I am moving into the way to develop sufficient tension and release. One of the best means is through pathos. I’ve written about pathos developing characters. What I want to do is expand this into pathos developing scenes. In most cases, a scene with a pathos developing character can be made pathetic. In any case, almost any scene can invoke pathos—pity and fear. This development of pity and fear is the driving force in tension and release. The question is how the author develops it.

I’m in Tokyo Japan—this isn’t a travel log, but I might find some examples to put here.

I’m not writing a travel blog, and I already have a hit and miss food, drink, and cigar blog, but I thought it might be fun to give some direct reporting from the Land of the Rising Sun.

Day eight in Japan, and we are still on our long trip. Before we left Hiroshima, we visited the castle. This is a great place to see. You can actually go up into it, and there is a museum inside.   We caught the Shinkansen from Hiroshima to Kyoto. I’ve been kind of caviler about Shinkansen travel. We have 14 day passes and bought our reserved seat Shinkansen tickets on day one in Japan. Those are the tickets we have been using for travel. That’s the way to go.

Like every morning for travel on the Shinkansen, onigiri, beer, sake, and hot drinks from the kiosks. We arrived after noon and headed for our Air BnB. We had the place for two days, this was the worst of the three. It wasn’t bad, but we had a single large room with two beds and a curtain down the middle. The bath was typically small, but the shower curtain had mold spots. For the price, it wasn’t too bad, but it wasn’t as nice as the others. This became our headquarters for our Kyoto excursions. It was a perfect location near the Gion district and the train station.

First stop in Kyoto, after the Air BnB, was Fushimi Inari Shrine—that’s the thousand torii gates. There are more than a thousand. They stretch up into the mountains and the entire trip takes two hours to negotiate. We went up to the first way station and got our souvenirs and went back through the exit. Take your pictures. The real excitement is the first two groups of gates there and back again. I should mention, the schools were all on their trips and the pictures were awesome with the kids in uniforms from elementary to high school in front of the shrines and areas. The souvenirs you want are the enma boards again. These are only available at the individual shrines and temples. The worshipers write on them, and place them on the enma board areas, you take yours home. Each has a picture from the shrine and they cost from 300 to 500 yen.

From the thousand torii gates, we went to see the thousand Buddhas. We ate dangos, ice cream, and rat on a stick from the vendors down the street. This is the festival shrine feel, and it’s really fun. The thousand Buddahs are really a thousand full sized Buddhas. You can’t take pictures, but still it’s worth seeing and the visit. It’s the Sanjsangendo Temple.

For dinner, we stayed in the Gion district. That’s the Geisha district. We went to Steak House Yoshida for wagu beef. This is a real culinary experience. They hand you an authentication for the cow you eat. The cost is high, but the beef tastes wonderful. It’s a multicourse meal and very fun.

Back to the Air BnB through the shrine district near the Gion area. There we got some wonderful night shots of the shrines and the street.

End of day eight.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing – part x194, Novel Form – Japan day 7

12 October 2017, Writing – part x194, Novel Form – Japan day 7

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
  5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 28th novel, working title, School, potential title Deirdre: Enchantment and the School. The theme statement is: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

Here is the cover proposal for Deirdre: Enchantment and the School.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I continued writing my 29th novel, working title Red Sonja. I finished my 28th novel, working title School. If you noticed, I started on number 28, but finished number 29 (in the starting sequence—it’s actually higher than that). I adjusted the numbering. I do keep everything clear in my records. I’ll be providing information on the marketing materials and editing.

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 29: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

This is the classical form for writing a successful novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters (protagonist, antagonist, and optionally the protagonist’s helper)
    4. Identify the telic flaw of the protagonist (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

The protagonist and the telic flaw are tied permanently together. The novel plot is completely dependent on the protagonist and the protagonist’s telic flaw. They are inseparable. This is likely the most critical concept about any normal (classical) form novel.

Here are the parts of a normal (classical) novel:

  1. The Initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  2. The Rising action scenes
  3. The Climax scene
  4. The Falling action scene(s)
  5. The Dénouement scene

So, how do you write a rich and powerful initial scene? Let’s start from a theme statement. Here is an example from my latest novel:

The theme statement for Deirdre: Enchantment and the School is: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

If you have the characters (protagonist, protagonist’s helper, and antagonist), the initial setting, the telic flaw (from the protagonist), a plot idea, the theme action, then you are ready to write the initial scene. I would state that since you have a protagonist, the telic flaw, a plot idea, and the theme action, you have about everything—what you might be lacking is the tension and release cycle in the initial scene.

Tension and release is the means to success in scene writing. The creative elements you introduce into the scenes (Chekov’s guns) are the catalysts that drive entertainment and excitement in a scene, and this is what scenes are all about.

I am moving into the way to develop sufficient tension and release. One of the best means is through pathos. I’ve written about pathos developing characters. What I want to do is expand this into pathos developing scenes. In most cases, a scene with a pathos developing character can be made pathetic. In any case, almost any scene can invoke pathos—pity and fear. This development of pity and fear is the driving force in tension and release. The question is how the author develops it.

I’m in Tokyo Japan—this isn’t a travel log, but I might find some examples to put here.

I’m not writing a travel blog, and I already have a hit and miss food, drink, and cigar blog, but I thought it might be fun to give some direct reporting from the Land of the Rising Sun.

Day seven in Japan, and we are still on our long trip. We caught the Shinkansen from Yokohoma at 0630—our earliest day. Onigiri, beer, sake, and hot drinks from the kiosks, and we are ready for the trip to Hiroshima. Part of the flare of travel on the Shinkansen is eating a bento and drinking sake while traveling at almost 300 km per hour. Every time another Shinkansen passes you, the entire train shakes.

We arrived after noon at Hiroshima and went to the Peace Museum. It’s all a huge play on the emotions. I really wish they presented the Japanese atrocities next to the moment that ended their war of aggression and saved over 20 million lives. The visit is worth it. The school kids were everywhere. The pathos is incredible. We also discovered a little known secret—a water taxi goes from the Hiroshima Peace Museum area to Miyajimacho and back. Whatever you do, don’t miss this—the price is a little steep, but you get a 45 minute water taxi all the way to Miyajimacho and then back to Hiroshima. Our Air BnB was in Hiroshima near the Peace Museum—that’s why this was such a great deal. If you don’t go this way, you will be going by bus, subway, train, and then water to Miyajimacho. Now, why Miyajimacho—this is the torii out in the water. This is one of the three most famous Japanese scenes. The Miyajimacho shrine is the shrine on the water with the water torii gate. The deer there will also eat your tickets and bother you. In addition to the shrine, the island is covered with other shrines and temples. We went to the famous shrine on the water and to the famous Buddhist shrine up the hill. There are numerous shrines and temples in this area. This is one of the locations of the famous 1001 Buddhas. These are small Buddhas. They are still magnificent. The Buddhist temples are almost like amusement parks compared to the stoic power of the Shinto shrines. In any case, you don’t want to miss this island if possible. Also, while there, you need to try the oysters. They sell them on the street. The oyster curry buns are awesome. The oysters cooked in their own shells are sweet and savory.

Back to Hiroshima proper and just behind the Peace Museum, you must go to the little okonomiyaki place on the corner. You can’t miss it. This is where you get your okonomiyaki. An okonomiyaki is a pancake made of noodles, cabbage, batter, an all kinds of fun stuff on top. Even if this doesn’t sound tasty to you, you have to try it. You can easily share one for two people. I ate three quarters of mine, but I was hungry. This is a piece of Japanese food culture, you should not miss.

We walked back to our Air BnB for the evening. Here is another fun piece of info. Our Air BnB was right outside a small Japanese bar. Most Japanese bars are small—tiny compared to the US or Europe. They fit less than ten people. The bar right outside our place was tiny and we were the only people in it. We watched baseball and the Carps lost.

End of day seven.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing – part x193, Novel Form – Japan day 6

11 October 2017, Writing – part x193, Novel Form – Japan day 6

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
  5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 28th novel, working title, School, potential title Deirdre: Enchantment and the School. The theme statement is: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

Here is the cover proposal for Deirdre: Enchantment and the School.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I continued writing my 29th novel, working title Red Sonja. I finished my 28th novel, working title School. If you noticed, I started on number 28, but finished number 29 (in the starting sequence—it’s actually higher than that). I adjusted the numbering. I do keep everything clear in my records. I’ll be providing information on the marketing materials and editing.

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 29: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

This is the classical form for writing a successful novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters (protagonist, antagonist, and optionally the protagonist’s helper)
    4. Identify the telic flaw of the protagonist (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

The protagonist and the telic flaw are tied permanently together. The novel plot is completely dependent on the protagonist and the protagonist’s telic flaw. They are inseparable. This is likely the most critical concept about any normal (classical) form novel.

Here are the parts of a normal (classical) novel:

  1. The Initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  2. The Rising action scenes
  3. The Climax scene
  4. The Falling action scene(s)
  5. The Dénouement scene

So, how do you write a rich and powerful initial scene? Let’s start from a theme statement. Here is an example from my latest novel:

The theme statement for Deirdre: Enchantment and the School is: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

If you have the characters (protagonist, protagonist’s helper, and antagonist), the initial setting, the telic flaw (from the protagonist), a plot idea, the theme action, then you are ready to write the initial scene. I would state that since you have a protagonist, the telic flaw, a plot idea, and the theme action, you have about everything—what you might be lacking is the tension and release cycle in the initial scene.

Tension and release is the means to success in scene writing. The creative elements you introduce into the scenes (Chekov’s guns) are the catalysts that drive entertainment and excitement in a scene, and this is what scenes are all about.

I am moving into the way to develop sufficient tension and release. One of the best means is through pathos. I’ve written about pathos developing characters. What I want to do is expand this into pathos developing scenes. In most cases, a scene with a pathos developing character can be made pathetic. In any case, almost any scene can invoke pathos—pity and fear. This development of pity and fear is the driving force in tension and release. The question is how the author develops it.

I’m in Tokyo Japan—this isn’t a travel log, but I might find some examples to put here.

I’m not writing a travel blog, and I already have a hit and miss food, drink, and cigar blog, but I thought it might be fun to give some direct reporting from the Land of the Rising Sun.

Day six in Japan is the long trip start day. We packed our day packs for four nights and headed out of the house at Fussa. On the way to the train station, we grabbed onigiri and snacks. We took the Shinkansen from Tokyo to Kamakura. You have to visit Kamakura to see the Big Green Buddha, plus you want to kick your feet in the ocean. The Big Green Buddha is big and green and for a few cents you can go inside to get your NG (National Geographic) shots. Somehow, we came to Japan during the season of all the school kids on their school trips. They were everywhere, but how iconic to have an NG shot of the Big Green Buddha with Japanese school kids around it. Get your camera taking skills at their peak and go to it. This is also where you want to get an enma wood piece for an inexpensive souvenir. You can also get a stamp for visiting each temple and many shrines and places. Fill up your stamp book. Other than the stamps and the enma wood blocks, there isn’t any special objects you necessarily need to buy here. I’ll get to the places to purchase your gifts and treasures later.

From the Big Green Buddha, we headed toward the shore and the Sea Castle Restaurant. This is a secluded and little known place and it is exquisitely German. I haven’t had as authentic German in the USA. The owners are Germans and likely came to Japan just after the War. Their food is just German. We all enjoyed bratwurst and kraut with kartoflen. It wasn’t Japanese food, but what a pleasant thing to eat on a cool seaside day.

I should have mentioned there is much more to the travel in these short tales, but I won’t bore you with the details—it is just fun. We headed on the train to Jomyoji for the temple, shrine, gardens, and tea. We thought the tea ceremony would be more of a ceremony—it wasn’t. It’s inexpensive, but you only get macha tea ceremony tea with a couple of sweets and you can contemplate the bamboo and the gardens. Do it. Try it. Take pictures. I got some great pictures of ladies in kimonos at the shrine. The Japanese love to dress up for their own tours and it makes you wonder if you have stepped back into the Edo period.

We checked into our Air BnB place in Yokohama after Jomyoji. This is so kool—that is to see how the average person lives in Japan. We had an apartment with a couple of bedrooms, a kitchen, a toilet, a bath, and a small sitting room. Cramped for living, but perfect for a night. It is iconically Japanese. I’m glad this isn’t the standard for the USA.

We went down into the city for the Ramen Museum. Now, this isn’t a museum and I’m not sure it’s worth seeing twice, but you should try it. You have to try the Ramen somewhere and the Ramen Museum is supposed to be the place. I thought it was a little expensive to enter and to eat. I guess everyone is getting a cut. One Ramen is enough for me, and we couldn’t find much safe food for our egg sensitive travel partner. In any case, it is a place to visit—and eat the Ramen.

End of day six.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing – part x192, Novel Form – Japan day 5

10 October 2017, Writing – part x192, Novel Form – Japan day 5

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

  1. Don’t confuse your readers.
  2. Entertain your readers.
  3. Ground your readers in the writing.
  4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
  5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

These are the steps I use to write a novel including the five discrete parts of a novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters
    4. Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

I finished writing my 28th novel, working title, School, potential title Deirdre: Enchantment and the School. The theme statement is: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

Here is the cover proposal for Deirdre: Enchantment and the School.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I continued writing my 29th novel, working title Red Sonja. I finished my 28th novel, working title School. If you noticed, I started on number 28, but finished number 29 (in the starting sequence—it’s actually higher than that). I adjusted the numbering. I do keep everything clear in my records. I’ll be providing information on the marketing materials and editing.

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

For novel 29: Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

This is the classical form for writing a successful novel:

  1. Design the initial scene
  2. Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)
    1. Research as required
    2. Develop the initial setting
    3. Develop the characters (protagonist, antagonist, and optionally the protagonist’s helper)
    4. Identify the telic flaw of the protagonist (internal and external)
  3. Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  4. Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)
  5. Write the climax scene
  6. Write the falling action scene(s)
  7. Write the dénouement scene

The protagonist and the telic flaw are tied permanently together. The novel plot is completely dependent on the protagonist and the protagonist’s telic flaw. They are inseparable. This is likely the most critical concept about any normal (classical) form novel.

Here are the parts of a normal (classical) novel:

  1. The Initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)
  2. The Rising action scenes
  3. The Climax scene
  4. The Falling action scene(s)
  5. The Dénouement scene

So, how do you write a rich and powerful initial scene? Let’s start from a theme statement. Here is an example from my latest novel:

The theme statement for Deirdre: Enchantment and the School is: Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

Here is the scene development outline:

  1. Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)
  2. Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)
  3. Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.
  4. Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.
  5. Write the release
  6. Write the kicker

If you have the characters (protagonist, protagonist’s helper, and antagonist), the initial setting, the telic flaw (from the protagonist), a plot idea, the theme action, then you are ready to write the initial scene. I would state that since you have a protagonist, the telic flaw, a plot idea, and the theme action, you have about everything—what you might be lacking is the tension and release cycle in the initial scene.

Tension and release is the means to success in scene writing. The creative elements you introduce into the scenes (Chekov’s guns) are the catalysts that drive entertainment and excitement in a scene, and this is what scenes are all about.

I am moving into the way to develop sufficient tension and release. One of the best means is through pathos. I’ve written about pathos developing characters. What I want to do is expand this into pathos developing scenes. In most cases, a scene with a pathos developing character can be made pathetic. In any case, almost any scene can invoke pathos—pity and fear. This development of pity and fear is the driving force in tension and release. The question is how the author develops it.

I’m in Tokyo Japan—this isn’t a travel log, but I might find some examples to put here.

I’m not writing a travel blog, and I already have a hit and miss food, drink, and cigar blog, but I thought it might be fun to give some direct reporting from the Land of the Rising Sun.

Day five in Japan is west Tokyo day. We checked out of our capsule hotel, after the bath and soak, and headed down the street to Jonathan’s. Jonathan’s is a family restaurant where you can get an English or a Japanese breakfast. Otherwise, breakfast is usually bread (the bread is great) or onigiri (rice balls). I had the Japanese breakfast. Food, like always, was plentiful and good.

Next, on to sightseeing. Our first stop was the Shinjuku Gardens. Unfortunately, times and closures are slightly problematic in Japan. Everything isn’t closed on Mondays, but restaurants, places, and sites vary in closure. Shinjuku Gardens was our only strikeout. We saw it from the outside. Our next stop was an owl café. Not sure why we decided to go to the neko café (cat café) instead, but we found ourselves with tea in hand at feeding time surrounded by about twenty cats. The cats ignored us. Still, these animal cafés are an iconic part of Japan. I’m not sure if they had then in the Edo times, but you’ll find them all over today.

Back to sightseeing. We went to Yoyogi Park and the Meiji Shrine there. Same kind of shrine stuff. World heritage, great to see, iconic, you don’t want to miss it, but there it is, another shrine. In fact, you will find shrines everywhere. Literally, at the beginning and end of every shopping district and area. Crammed into the space of a shop. On the left after a corner. Shrines, small, large, and medium are everywhere.

At the Meiji Shrine we saw two Shinto weddings.  This was really fun and everyone was taking pictures.  You catch these NG (National Geographic) photo moments all the time.

We had lunch reservations at Hacienda Del Cielo. Why go to Japan to eat Tex-Mex? Why not? The Japanese spin on Mexican is interesting and tasty. Plus, at the Hacienda, you can sit on their open terrace, eat, and drink Japanese Margaritas to your heart’s content. The city and people viewing is what is pleasant.

You can’t visit Tokyo and not see Shibuya Crossing, the largest, most complex, and busiest intersection in the world. We also took the required dog photos at the station. You cross the street with everyone else—you gotta see it once. It’s kind of like New York’s Central Square on steroids. You must get the required center of the street selfie.

If that wasn’t enough, we had reservations for Ninja Akasaka Restaurant at 1700. That was too early for me, especially after a wonderful large lunch. The Ninja Akasaka Restaurant is a ninja theme Restaurant and one of the best theme restaurants in Tokyo. You have to find the secret entrance in the side of a wall. Your Ninja server takes you through the secret passages deep into the bowels of the earth and to your specially cell/serving room. The interior is dark and exciting with the sound of water flowing just at your side. The food comes in courses and is very Japanese and very pleasant. It is also very Ninja themed. I loved it and suggest it as a destination—make sure you are hungry. You definitely don’t want to miss the exquisite beef and the wonderfully crafted desert.

After dinner, we hoofed it to the station and took a train back to Fussa and our beds.

End of day five.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/

http://www.aegyptnovel.com/

http://www.centurionnovel.com

http://www.thesecondmission.com/

http://www.theendofhonor.com/

http://www.thefoxshonor.com

http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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