Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 788, Developing The Climax

31 August 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 788, Developing The Climax

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

To me, the most important part of any novel is the initial scene. However, the climax is the peak of the novel. This means the author is focusing every part of the novel toward the climax. How you can have a poor climax after that, I can’t fathom. Indeed, the entire focus of the protagonist, the telic flaw of the protagonist, the plot, the storyline, the theme is always and only the climax. Everything in a novel is the climax. I will admit that I have kind of backdoored a few climaxes. What I mean by that is that the climax of the novel was slightly ambiguous and I made it a bigger climax that it ordinarily might be. Lilly is a novel like that. The run up to the climax begins to slowly break down all the good that Lilly and Dane achieved. When Lilly loses everything, her friend Coyote helps her recover her place and power.

The climax can be big or little—I recommend big and as big as possible. Now, by that I don’t mean end of the world. You can see that most of the movies made today aren’t about personal tragedy—they are about corporate world tragedy—the end of the world. The climax should be big, but human big and not inhuman big.

How can I make the climax of Red Sonja really big? Well, no one is going to launch a nuclear attack because of a single spy. The tragedy of Red Sonja is Red Sonja and whoever gets sucked into her plot and circumstance. The ultimate climax of such a novel builds to the potential loss of her life and perhaps her friends, lover, or acquaintances. Her capture during a time of peace and quiet. Her accidental injury or perhaps being shot. The lack of understanding of those around her and their confusion. Perhaps the Soviets tried to capture and shoot her the week before then turned her in themselves or another spy turned her in. The details are all part of the plot—that I haven’t written yet.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 787, more of The Climax

30 August 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 787, more of The Climax

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

If Red Sonja’s external telic flaw is that she is a Soviet spy, and her internal telic flaw is her allegiance to the USSR, then what should be the climax? For this to be a comedy, she should come to an internal change based on her own thoughts and experience. This will result in a change of heart. That’s positive, but not very good at all. The external telic flaw is a worse problem for her. She might want to stop being a Soviet spy, but she has to face the Soviet Union and potentially the USA government. The chance of being killed by your own side is pretty high. The possibility of being caught as a spy is pretty high too. Both of these would make great climaxes for the novel. You can have an internal telic flaw climax and an external telic flaw climax, but you really can’t or shouldn’t have two external or internal climaxes. However, you can write a really great scene that includes both the Soviets and the USG or perhaps separate scenes with one primary climax.

Here’s my point—in this novel, the climax is obvious, but can be approached in many ways. The author can write the climax in many ways, but the climax is an open area that the author can exert an incredible level of creativity in writing in and writing to it. Here we go.

The author’s job is to write. Writing means creativity. Now, I think the theme for this novel is pretty unique. You can have a well-used theme and common characters with a common telic flaw, but turn something like that into a wonderful novel. Think of Shakespeare. He wove well used themes into very powerful works of art. The climax of most of his pieces are obvious, but the way he approached them made them new, and the way he wrote them made them unique and powerful.

The author’s skill comes from the writing and not necessarily the theme or basis of the climax.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 786, The Climax

29 August 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 786, The Climax

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

I can’t imagine how a Soviet spy could come to the USA, see the freedom and luxuries of the place and remain a Soviet spy. The one with families or hostages back in the USSR, those I understand. The lives of their families and friends were more important than their freedom. But for those who had no family or friends of note in the USSR—what about them. I can imagine that the planners and the spy handlers didn’t fully understand the circumstances and experiences a spy would face in the USA. This is what I want to fully capture in my novel about Red Sonja.

Red Sonja is an orphan fully trained with a Midwest accent in English to be a Soviet spy. She is trained in everything the Soviets can imagine about the USA, but they don’t know everything. Her experiences are very different from her expectations. She expects a lecherous pilot boss. He is nice and goes to church on Sundays. She expects the wealthy and the impoverished, she sees mostly wealth and little poverty. She sees people with great freedom and plenty of food. As she tries to continue her mission, she wonders if she is doing the right thing.

Red Sonja was trained as an engineer and a spy. An engineer so she can understand the secrets she is supposed to steal. A spy to steal them. She is also a pilot in her own right. She wasn’t the best engineer or the best pilot, but she was a great spy. The irony is that she sees in the USA what she might have been. In the USA she could have been an engineer. She could have been a pilot. In the USSR, these are merely dreams they fill the people with. The reality is that only party members can be pilots or engineers. She was only fit to be a spy and being a Soviet spy is no fun at all.

This experience and life is what I want to show in this novel. The beauty of the USA in the eyes of a Soviet spy and her attempt to escape. Can you see the potential climaxes?

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 785, more of The Rising Action

28 August 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 785, more of The Rising Action

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

The obvious telic flaw for Red Sonja is that she is a Soviet spy. This is an external telic flaw, however, the mindset that makes her a Soviet spy turns this into an internal telic flaw. In other words to change, Red Sonja must be convinced that being a Soviet spy is not a good thing. Still, if this is a tragedy, Red Sonja can get rid of being a Soviet spy by dying. She can die in a hail of gunfire or suicide or killed by the Soviet. There are other end game options, but none of them are good and certainly aren’t really worth a novel (in my opinion). A Soviet spy who remains a Soviet spy under duress and seeing freedom is just stupid or a super patriot—a patriot for evil and stupidity, but a patriot. On the other hand, I’ve never read a novel about a spy who had a change of heart. I’m sure there are, but an internal telic flaw assumes the character’s mind can or will change. If her internal telic flaw changes, the huge question is can the external telic flaw change. Usually when a spy changes sides, they are made a counter spy or they are tried and imprisoned.

For Red Sonja, I want her internal transformation and then an external change. The climax should be obvious. For this type of novel, there are usually two climaxes: the internal climax and the external climax. The internal climax is when Red Sonja decides that the USA is not a bad place and she shouldn’t act as a spy anymore. The external climax seems more fun to me. I want it to be when she is caught as a spy and has to face the music. I’m working on the when this should happen and how deep she is involved in her community and with people. This is a great creative element.

The creative element is a question of when and how should the climax take place. The external climax is noted. The creative element is to what degree. I say—as far as you can get it baby. The greater the tension, the better the climax. Thus, the perfect image is Red Sonja completely integrated in her new culture and society imagining she is safe from detection, but betrayed at the worst time and in the worst way. The rising action should build to this.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 784, The Rising Action

27 August 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 784, The Rising Action

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I’m editing many of my novels using comments from my primary reader. I finished my 27th novel, working title Claire. I’m working on marketing materials.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

If you look above, you will see the five discrete parts of a novel. All good and successful novels have these five parts. Now, there are some Roman Fluv novels out there that ascribe to not have a climax—so be it, I say those are not novels. A novel without a climax is like a scene without a release. It exists, but does it make a sound when it falls in the forest. Really, such novels are usually not worth reading. Let’s assume as a writer of “good” novels, we accept that all novels must have the five discrete parts listed above.

In that case, following the initial scene, the author is in the rising action. By definition, everything from the initial scene to the climax is the rising action. This is the brass tacks of the novel—the fun part, the character revelation part, the building tension to the climax part. This is my favorite part. I enjoy the initial scene. I enjoy the climax. I love the rising action. This is the part where your characters live their lives and reveal the plot. The rising action should be filled with creative elements that entertain the reader. There should be nuggets on every page—the little pieces of excitement, entertainment, and foreshadowing that led the reader to the bitter or not so bitter end.

This is why and how I let the novel produce itself. I write each scene and see where that scene leaves my characters—that is the output of the scene. I start with that output as the input for the next scene and see where that scene goes etc. I know I’m moving toward the climax—that is my focus, but I’m letting the characters get there on their own. That is the entertaining part of writing to me. It is also the discovery part. Sometimes it leads to a very interesting climax, but the climax is always set by the character’s telic flaw—just so you remember. You might ask, what is Red Sonja’s telic flaw and what is the climax?

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 783, Input of the Second Scene

26 August 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 783, Input of the Second Scene

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I’m editing many of my novels using comments from my primary reader. I finished my 27th novel, working title Claire. I’m working on marketing materials.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

The output of the initial scene becomes the input for the next scene. The output was the promise to take Dorothy to dinner. She prepares for dinner and Mike picks her up. The end of this scene, the output, will likely be Mike’s promise to get her settled and started the next day. At some point I need to weave in the history from the times and place. The earliest date I have is 8 June when the X-15 engine blew up during a ground test. This will definitely be a buildup in the novel.

There is much more to the overall plot than you might imagine. The Soviets would not send a spy for a highly technical program who wasn’t trained and knowledgeable about aerodynamics, aircraft, and rockets. Red Sonja was educated in all these things. This will help provide her winter of discontent. The tension created by a person who was steeped in tyranny, who is suddenly in a truly free place will play heavily in the novel. This will help produce her issues and the overall tension in the novel.

Imagine a person from the very poor USSR who has been used to survival rations. When she has plenty to eat and all great food. When she sees everyone can eat this food. Imagine a person from the very restrictive USSR who sees freedom of expression and freedom of religion and freedom to have weapons. What about the scope of money and purchasing power. Red Sonja has been taught that the poor workers have nothing, but the rich wealthy have everything. How can she explain her own story, a Kansas farmer’s daughter who has a GS-4 job in an X plane program. Or how Mike, the son of a sharecropper can be a pilot in such a program. These conundrums have similar resolutions—their resolution in the plot will lead to her change (plus other problems).

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 782, Output of the Initial Scene

25 August 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 782, Output of the Initial Scene

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I’m editing many of my novels using comments from my primary reader. I finished my 27th novel, working title Claire. I’m working on marketing materials.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

How to begin a novel. Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea. I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement. Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement. Here is an initial cut.

Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

So, then what is the output of the initial scene. Most specifically, I decided that having Dorothy get her own room in the woman’s dormitory would be a perfect place for the scene to end. In that scene, Mike promised to take Dorothy to dinner. This gives an opportunity for them to share more information together.

I think I’ve written more than once before that in my opinion, the best way to reveal characters is to place them in positions where they can communicate with each other. Dorothy can’t ever communicate with anyone. She is a spy. The point is to allow her and Mike, her target to speak together. Dinner is a perfect opportunity for this. It is also an opportunity for me to show the reader Edwards Air Force Base especially the parts that are different now. The officer’s club is one of those places.

Conversation allows characters to reveal themselves and their thoughts without telling. This is the great power of conversation. The output of the initial scene becomes the input for the next scene. I picture Mike taking Dorothy to the officer’s club and their dinner. The point of this is Dorothy’s reflection and her introduction to decent food. Additionally, the characters will be able to converse about their work and lives. Mike has every reason to talk. He’s a gregarious pilot. Dorothy has every reason to listen and try to keep quiet. She is a spy. She wants to know about everything, but especially about the X programs on base. She’ll get a lesson in much more.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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