Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 749, still more Conclusions, My Distinct Manner of Writing Q and A

23 July 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 749, still more Conclusions, My Distinct Manner of Writing Q and A

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I’m editing many of my novels using comments from my primary reader. I finished editing Children of Light and Darkness and am now writing on my 27th novel, working title Claire.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

One of my blog readers posed these questions.  I’ll use the next few weeks to answer them.

  1. Conflict/tension between characters
  2. Character presentation (appearance, speech, behavior, gestures, actions)
  3. Change, complexity of relationship, and relation to issues/theme
  4. Evolving vs static character
  5. Language and style
  6. Verbal, gesture, action
  7. Words employed
  8. Sentence length
  9. Complexity
  10. Type of grammar
  11. Diction
  12. Field of reference or allusion
  13. Tone – how tone is created through diction, rhythm, sentence construction, sound effects, images created by similes, syntax/re-arrangement of words in sentence, the inflections of the silent or spoken voice, etc.
  14. Mannerism suggested by speech
  15. Style
  16. Distinct manner of writing or speaking you employ, and why (like Pinter’s style includes gaps, silences, non-sequiturs, and fragments while Chekhov’s includes ‘apparent’ inconclusiveness).

Moving on to 16. 16. Distinct manner of writing or speaking you employ, and why (like Pinter’s style includes gaps, silences, non-sequiturs, and fragments while Chekhov’s includes ‘apparent’ inconclusiveness).

Always remember, the point of novel writing is to entertain. The way to develop a manner of writing and style is through practice, feedback, and understanding. I’ll discuss understanding next.

When I started writing novels, I had many good examples and some practice. What I didn’t have was lots of practice or any real understanding of how to construct a novel or a scene. There’s much more to understand, but just the information I leave in the preamble to this daily blog is more than I had in my writer’s mind or training. I have to say I did learn about the parts of a novel from my high school English teacher, Mr. James Martin—except, and this is a huge exception. I don’t remember any discussion of the importance of the initial scene. I’d have to look back at my notes, but I think the basic English studies outline of any regular novel is this:

  1. Rising action
  2. Climax
  3. Falling action

Basic English studies focuses on the understanding of writing and the writing of novels themselves. Authors want to know how to write. Thus, I teach you the fundamentals (plus a bunch of very detailed secrets). This is understanding.

Look back at my outline for a novel (above)—you know inherently this is the way a novel should be constructed. If you know this, you have a chance at writing a great novel. Even if you can’t write a great novel, you know what should go into one. This is my point—it isn’t enough to identify how a novel is constructed, what the author needs to know is how to construct a novel. If I tell you, you need an entertaining and exciting initial scene, and you write one—you are on your way to writing a good novel. I wish I knew this from the start. I might have written some of my published novels a little differently.

I’ve already confessed and explained the mistakes I made—my novels still were published. They are fun and exciting novels. They just could have been better, but so is life. As authors, we progress—unless we are the very very few who write one bestseller and give up writing forever after that. How that could be, I don’t know. I think such a person either didn’t really write their “great” novel or they need a bop on the back of the head. So troublesome. An author is supposed to love to write. If you don’t, please don’t try. Thank you.

Back to understanding. This is what I do for you and for myself. As I analyze my writing and others’ writing for the purpose of understanding, I become a better author. If you read this blog, I’m trying to pass some knowledge to know about what I’ve learned over the years. Many times I know my ruminations might not be as clear or well developed as you or I would like, but much of this is trying to put into words very difficult ideas and concepts. Concepts like manner and style or about how to write a scene or conversation. I suspect many experienced writers would balk at trying to explain these ideas. They are difficult for me, and I’m used to explaining hard ideas and concepts.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 748, more Conclusions, My Distinct Manner of Writing Q and A

22 July 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 748, more Conclusions, My Distinct Manner of Writing Q and A

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I’m editing many of my novels using comments from my primary reader. I finished editing Children of Light and Darkness and am now writing on my 27th novel, working title Claire.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

One of my blog readers posed these questions.  I’ll use the next few weeks to answer them.

  1. Conflict/tension between characters
  2. Character presentation (appearance, speech, behavior, gestures, actions)
  3. Change, complexity of relationship, and relation to issues/theme
  4. Evolving vs static character
  5. Language and style
  6. Verbal, gesture, action
  7. Words employed
  8. Sentence length
  9. Complexity
  10. Type of grammar
  11. Diction
  12. Field of reference or allusion
  13. Tone – how tone is created through diction, rhythm, sentence construction, sound effects, images created by similes, syntax/re-arrangement of words in sentence, the inflections of the silent or spoken voice, etc.
  14. Mannerism suggested by speech
  15. Style
  16. Distinct manner of writing or speaking you employ, and why (like Pinter’s style includes gaps, silences, non-sequiturs, and fragments while Chekhov’s includes ‘apparent’ inconclusiveness).

Moving on to 16. 16. Distinct manner of writing or speaking you employ, and why (like Pinter’s style includes gaps, silences, non-sequiturs, and fragments while Chekhov’s includes ‘apparent’ inconclusiveness).

The road of the author is one of great effort and love. The continuing road of the author is great effort and love. This is my simple point about writing. To become an accomplished writer, you need to write. I have read some very great writing both in print and not in print. I know there are people out there who’s writing skills are not recognized, but I also know—if you develop your skills to a certain level, you will most likely be acknowledged and published. There is also this pesky thing about markets—that can be a real problem.

Acknowledged is required before published. Part of the problem today is the ease of publication and the lack of professional access. There are so many people writing novels out there, the market is saturated. Many, if not most don’t have the skills or the experience to write well. There is nothing wrong with fighting for your works. This is a natural skill the writer needs—the skill of presenting her works to publishers. The problem is the writer doesn’t usually get back much feedback.

Most writers get echo chamber feedback. Their readers are so worried about the writer’s feelings, they don’t give good feedback—or they mistake feedback for editing. I’d rather get feedback than any editing. If someone doesn’t like my writing, that is as important as those who do. The real problem is why they don’t like the writing. If they say, “I didn’t like it”—you can’t do much with that. On the other hand, if they say, I didn’t like it because… That is wonderful. I can do something with that—I can revise and reflect.

Most writers aren’t looking for feedback—they want echo chamber. I’m looking for truth. I once had someone read a book that is now in publication, their response—I don’t like that kind of literature. That’s cool too, but obviously the wrong person to enjoy the writing. I have traded feedback and editing with other authors with mixed experiences. I want to provide feedback. Many want editing and not feedback. I want feedback—any editing is just extra topping on the cake.

What’s the point? Manner of writing and style come out of experience. Experience is developed by writing and feedback. The feedback isn’t editing—feedback is when a person gives you a response about your writing that leads to you making changes in the writing. Not editorial changes like grammar or spelling but rather changes in plot, character, or theme. Even a person who doesn’t like your type or theme of literature can provide constructive feedback—like, I didn’t like your protagonist because… I’ve provided that kind of feedback before. I want to like the protagonist. I don’t need the protagonist to always be romantic or pathos building, but I’d like one who seems fun or interesting. Always remember, the point of novel writing is to entertain. The way to develop a manner of writing and style is through practice, feedback, and understanding. I’ll discuss understanding next…

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 747, Conclusions, My Distinct Manner of Writing Q and A

21 July 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 747, Conclusions, My Distinct Manner of Writing Q and A

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I’m editing many of my novels using comments from my primary reader. I finished editing Children of Light and Darkness and am now writing on my 27th novel, working title Claire.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

One of my blog readers posed these questions.  I’ll use the next few weeks to answer them.

  1. Conflict/tension between characters
  2. Character presentation (appearance, speech, behavior, gestures, actions)
  3. Change, complexity of relationship, and relation to issues/theme
  4. Evolving vs static character
  5. Language and style
  6. Verbal, gesture, action
  7. Words employed
  8. Sentence length
  9. Complexity
  10. Type of grammar
  11. Diction
  12. Field of reference or allusion
  13. Tone – how tone is created through diction, rhythm, sentence construction, sound effects, images created by similes, syntax/re-arrangement of words in sentence, the inflections of the silent or spoken voice, etc.
  14. Mannerism suggested by speech
  15. Style
  16. Distinct manner of writing or speaking you employ, and why (like Pinter’s style includes gaps, silences, non-sequiturs, and fragments while Chekhov’s includes ‘apparent’ inconclusiveness).

Moving on to 16. 16. Distinct manner of writing or speaking you employ, and why (like Pinter’s style includes gaps, silences, non-sequiturs, and fragments while Chekhov’s includes ‘apparent’ inconclusiveness).

There is more to my manner of writing and style. You just have to read my novels to see it. I will tell you, my manner of writing and style have changed over time. I think they have improved significantly. In general, I think my writing has improved and continues to improve. The more novels I write, the better I become as a writer.

I’ve written many times before, to gain the skills necessary to become a published author, a writer needs to write about one million words. One million words is about 8 to 10 100,000 word novels. You can have credit for rewriting and editing, but only so much—the proof is in the pudding. Many authors give up too soon. They write one novel and can’t get that novel published. They conclude they are not that good at writing—at that point, they aren’t, and they give up. From my point of view, such a writer has Darwined themselves.

If you want to be a successful author, you first need to love to write. If you love to write, it doesn’t matter how many novels you have written or have published—you will keep writing. I’ll have to admit, every time I get another contract or another novel published, it gives me the energy to write a few more novels. A little encouragement is a good thing.

Once you have the skills to write, continue writing. I’m always astounded by the few people who have claimed to have written very little, but write best sellers or classics. I’m thinking Salinger and Lee. How their success as an entertainer (author) didn’t encourage them to write more and more novels, I have no idea. I think their success and their authorship was a fluke. They either didn’t think up the novel themselves or they had too much help in the authorship. I don’t mean to disparage those authors, but what an absolute waste.

If they didn’t have any other ideas, how sad. If they had too much help and never gained their own voice, how sad. Whatever drove them out of the path of writing for fun and the entertainment of others, don’t take that road yourself.

The road of the author is one of great effort and love. The continuing road of the author is great effort and love.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 746, Actions Developing Conversation, My Distinct Manner of Writing Q and A

20 July 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 746, Actions Developing Conversation, My Distinct Manner of Writing Q and A

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I’m editing many of my novels using comments from my primary reader. I finished editing Children of Light and Darkness and am now writing on my 27th novel, working title Claire.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

One of my blog readers posed these questions.  I’ll use the next few weeks to answer them.

  1. Conflict/tension between characters
  2. Character presentation (appearance, speech, behavior, gestures, actions)
  3. Change, complexity of relationship, and relation to issues/theme
  4. Evolving vs static character
  5. Language and style
  6. Verbal, gesture, action
  7. Words employed
  8. Sentence length
  9. Complexity
  10. Type of grammar
  11. Diction
  12. Field of reference or allusion
  13. Tone – how tone is created through diction, rhythm, sentence construction, sound effects, images created by similes, syntax/re-arrangement of words in sentence, the inflections of the silent or spoken voice, etc.
  14. Mannerism suggested by speech
  15. Style
  16. Distinct manner of writing or speaking you employ, and why (like Pinter’s style includes gaps, silences, non-sequiturs, and fragments while Chekhov’s includes ‘apparent’ inconclusiveness).

Moving on to 16. 16. Distinct manner of writing or speaking you employ, and why (like Pinter’s style includes gaps, silences, non-sequiturs, and fragments while Chekhov’s includes ‘apparent’ inconclusiveness).

I kept up the conversation example from my latest novel, Sorcha: Enchantment and the Curse. What I want to point out today is the actions within the body of the conversation. You might call these gestures, but they include much more than gestures. Look at the first paragraph the tension and release cycle is started with Sveta’s stare. The stare at Shiggy’s shoulder is an immediate mystery. Those readers who get it will immediately catch that Sveta can see Angel—this is an intentional irony and a secret immediately revealed in the context of the conversation.

Next, there is the response of Daniel—he can’t see Angel and neither can the Captain or the Major.

Sveta runs off with Shiggy and Sorcha, and here is where things get really interesting. Look at how the actions and the conversation are conveyed in the scene. There’s a lot of showing going on here. Sveta’s holding on to Shiggy is funny and satire. I like to think of my conversation writing as dry humor wrapped in pathos. There are no hysterics going on, but many of the participants are becoming uncomfortable. This irony, pathos, and satire come through the actions of the characters as well as their words.

Sveta totally devastates Angel and for good reasons. The reader has hints throughout that Angel isn’t the brightest tool in the shed—Sveta confirms that and so does Angel.

Sveta suddenly stared at Shiggy’s shoulder, “Not quite yet. Shiggy, Sorcha come with me and bring…well you know.” Sveta kissed Daniel’s cheek, “Entertain these gentlemen for just a moment, we girls need to take a powder. I’ll be back before our next guests arrive.”

Daniel stood for a moment speechless. He turned to Captain Cross and Major Easom.

Sveta grasped Shiggy’s hand and pulled her to the side and into a sitting room. Sorcha swaggered after them.

Sveta didn’t let go of Shiggy, “Sorcha, close the door.” She turned to Shiggy and pointed at Shiggy’s left shoulder, “Really, what do you mean by bringing her with you?”

Shiggy swallowed, “Mrs. Long may I introduce Angel Trumpet of the Seelie Court.”

Angel curtsied very nicely, “Good evening, Lady of…” Sveta made an elaborate symbol in the air. It shimmered and pulsed for a moment, then disappeared.

Whatever Angel was going to say suddenly stopped. Sveta raised her chin and gripped Shiggy’s arm, “Angel Trumpet, I did not invite you into this house, and I did not expect you,” she glared at Shiggy, “to bring one of the fae in here.”

Shiggy tried to pull away, “Ma’am, my arm.”

Sveta glared at Shiggy and Angel, “Sorcha, what is the meaning of this?”

Sorcha slid over, but not too close, “Well, Aunty, Mrs. Calloway thought Shiggy should have a little extra help in the judgement and wrong-doing area. She assigned Ms. Angel Trumpet here to be Shiggy’s conscious.”

“You’re kidding, right?”

“Serious as a heart attack.”

“Why would she do something like this?”

“You can ask her. She’s attending this evening. I suspect she’ll ask Shiggy and Angel how things are working out.”

Sveta continued to glare, “Why in the world would Mrs. Calloway assign this stupid fairy to Shiggy?”

Angel snuffled.

“Not a word or a sniffle out of you, Angel Trumpet. I don’t need you poisoning my guests or burning my carpet.”

Angel squeaked.

“And what is this fae creature wearing?”

Shiggy was still trying to twist out of Sveta’s grasp, “It’s just Barbie clothing. I thought she could use a little finery for the season.”

Sveta closed her eyes, “Sorcha does this Shiggy understand about fae gifts?”

Shiggy yelled, “You don’t need to ask her, ma’am. I understand. I understand.”

Sveta’s eyes popped open. She groaned, “Very well, Angel Trumpet, what did you give in return for this very fine gift?”

Angel sniffed, “I gave a bit of fae fire…as…as well as companionship. What are such gifts among friends?”

Sveta stuck her finger against Angel’s neck. She still held Shiggy with a grasp of steel. “A friend. You call this Shiggy a friend?”

Angel trembled and sniffled, “She is a friend of the fae.”

“Sorcha. Sorcha, did you know this?”

Sorcha still stood near the door, “I knew she was accepted by an Unseelie. About the Seelie, I didn’t know.”

Shiggy sniffled, “What is so wrong with being a friend of the fae?”

Sorcha and Sveta answered together, “Obligations, dear.”

Sveta suddenly released Shiggy. That sent her reeling back against Sorcha. Sorcha caught her.

Sveta still glared. She crossed her arms, “The first is this. Angel Trumpet, no one in this house invited you inside. You are not a companion, guest, associate, friend, or servant here. Do you understand this?”

Angel pressed her hands together, “Mrs. Calloway made this abundantly clear in the charging. I am only an associate for Shiggy. I can only go where she goes and nowhere else. I cannot and will not return to this house.”

“Swear it.”

Angel balked, “I swore already to Mrs. Calloway.”

“Swear it to me, or so help me…”

“I do swear all you asked by the One and All that I will not consider my entrance a standing invitation into your house.” Angel’s hair puffed out. She snarled, “I hate that.”

Sveta lowered her chin, “Second, I will have no fae events at my party. Ms. Tash, Shiggy, you are responsible for that dolled up fairy. Do not let her out of your sight and do not allow her to accomplish any action, use fae power, invite any other fae here, disturb or bother my other guests. Is that clear? There will be guests here who can see her. If anyone asks, tell them Mrs. Calloway allowed it and I know about it. Do not tell anyone about gifts, being friends, being assigned, or anything else concerning this issue. In every sense, use what little common sense you seem to have Shiggy Tash, and do not cause an eruption of unrestraint tonight.”

Shiggy nodded emphatically.

“I really should make you and this fairy swear, but she knows what will happen to her already, and you can’t swear in this fashion. Third, this has royally disturbed my holiday. I don’t know how you can repair the current situation, but I want to see both of you in my office next Monday. Thank the Dagda that I don’t have to put up with Heidi or Scáth this year.” Sveta stomped to the door. Sorcha jumped out of her way and pulled Shiggy to the side. Sveta stood for a good ten seconds taking deep breaths. She smiled, opened the door, and glided out again.

Continuing from above. Look at the series of actions. Sveta drags Shiggy and Sorcha swaggers into the sunroom. Sveta accosts Shiggy and Angel. Sveta dresses down Angel, and brings some very interesting information about Mrs. Calloway’s choices. Sveta gives great information about fae gifts and obligations. The reader begins to realize things are not what they seem. Shigy begins to realize everything isn’t what she thought it was. These are secrets. I love secrets and I love them in my writing. This is how I write—this is the manner of my writing.

Specifically, I’m going for irony, satire, pathos, and hiding secrets from my readers—secrets I tantalize my characters and my readers with. This is the manner of writing, and this is the style that I think sets my writing apart from other authors. I hope my readers and many readers can appreciate this manner and style. To me, it is entertaining.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 745, more Developing Conversation, My Distinct Manner of Writing Q and A

19 July 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 745, more Developing Conversation, My Distinct Manner of Writing Q and A

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I’m editing many of my novels using comments from my primary reader. I finished editing Children of Light and Darkness and am now writing on my 27th novel, working title Claire.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

One of my blog readers posed these questions.  I’ll use the next few weeks to answer them.

  1. Conflict/tension between characters
  2. Character presentation (appearance, speech, behavior, gestures, actions)
  3. Change, complexity of relationship, and relation to issues/theme
  4. Evolving vs static character
  5. Language and style
  6. Verbal, gesture, action
  7. Words employed
  8. Sentence length
  9. Complexity
  10. Type of grammar
  11. Diction
  12. Field of reference or allusion
  13. Tone – how tone is created through diction, rhythm, sentence construction, sound effects, images created by similes, syntax/re-arrangement of words in sentence, the inflections of the silent or spoken voice, etc.
  14. Mannerism suggested by speech
  15. Style
  16. Distinct manner of writing or speaking you employ, and why (like Pinter’s style includes gaps, silences, non-sequiturs, and fragments while Chekhov’s includes ‘apparent’ inconclusiveness).

Moving on to 16. 16. Distinct manner of writing or speaking you employ, and why (like Pinter’s style includes gaps, silences, non-sequiturs, and fragments while Chekhov’s includes ‘apparent’ inconclusiveness).

Here is the example of conversation from my latest novel. I’ll try to point out those features that are manner and style in the writing. First of all, in this short piece, you can see the theme types in my writing. There is a fairy—a fae being who is the focus of the argument. The tension and release cycle is based around the fairy, Angel and the incident of the Christmas party.

The conversation begins with no explanation as to the problem—then, bang, Sveta let’s Shiggy have it. Shiggy isn’t really at fault. Angel isn’t really at fault. Sorcha isn’t really at fault. I love this kind of situation. There is tension and a very good reason for tension—through the entire novel, the message is that being friends with the fae is a dangerous thing. We find this to be true to some degree. Sveta doesn’t want the fae in her house—she can’t control them.

If you notice, Angel attempts to address who Sveta really is. Sveta doesn’t want Shiggy to know, and thus shuts Angel down. The reader never really gets to know who Sveta is—if a reader has read my other novels, they will know. Who she is, is not important to the novel, but the fact she is someone special is important—this is also a manner of my writing. I love secrets. I love to present secrets to my readers and never tell them the answer. Some of the secrets can be answered in history and literature. Some can be answered in my other writing. Some are just fun secrets. You never know everything about a person—there are always secrets. Secrets is one of the elements of style in my writing.

Angel is a terrible choice for Shiggy’s conscious. This is another manner of writing that I love to use. That is a bad choice for some project or for some work that causes other problems in the novel. Usually, in most writing, the author writes about characters making logical and reasoned choices. People rarely make perfect logical or reasoned choices. In the real world, it’s not unusual to have a person who is a terrible choice for a job or a project. I like to use this for tension and release and just for the fun of the irony. Angel is a bad choice, but how much fun can that be. Think about it, a powerful and dangerous being who isn’t bright but who is in charge of being a conscious for Shiggy. Poor choices (by the characters) is an element of my style.

I like irony, paradox, and satire. Look at the example below. Angel is irony. To Sveta, this is a paradox. The entire situation is satire. These logical conundrums are distinct manner of my writing.

Sveta suddenly stared at Shiggy’s shoulder, “Not quite yet. Shiggy, Sorcha come with me and bring…well you know.” Sveta kissed Daniel’s cheek, “Entertain these gentlemen for just a moment, we girls need to take a powder. I’ll be back before our next guests arrive.”

Daniel stood for a moment speechless. He turned to Captain Cross and Major Easom.

Sveta grasped Shiggy’s hand and pulled her to the side and into a sitting room. Sorcha swaggered after them.

Sveta didn’t let go of Shiggy, “Sorcha, close the door.” She turned to Shiggy and pointed at Shiggy’s left shoulder, “Really, what do you mean by bringing her with you?”

Shiggy swallowed, “Mrs. Long may I introduce Angel Trumpet of the Seelie Court.”

Angel curtsied very nicely, “Good evening, Lady of…” Sveta made an elaborate symbol in the air. It shimmered and pulsed for a moment, then disappeared.

Whatever Angel was going to say suddenly stopped. Sveta raised her chin and gripped Shiggy’s arm, “Angel Trumpet, I did not invite you into this house, and I did not expect you,” she glared at Shiggy, “to bring one of the fae in here.”

Shiggy tried to pull away, “Ma’am, my arm.”

Sveta glared at Shiggy and Angel, “Sorcha, what is the meaning of this?”

Sorcha slid over, but not too close, “Well, Aunty, Mrs. Calloway thought Shiggy should have a little extra help in the judgement and wrong-doing area. She assigned Ms. Angel Trumpet here to be Shiggy’s conscious.”

“You’re kidding, right?”

“Serious as a heart attack.”

“Why would she do something like this?”

“You can ask her. She’s attending this evening. I suspect she’ll ask Shiggy and Angel how things are working out.”

Sveta continued to glare, “Why in the world would Mrs. Calloway assign this stupid fairy to Shiggy?”

Angel snuffled.

“Not a word or a sniffle out of you, Angel Trumpet. I don’t need you poisoning my guests or burning my carpet.”

Angel squeaked.

“And what is this fae creature wearing?”

Shiggy was still trying to twist out of Sveta’s grasp, “It’s just Barbie clothing. I thought she could use a little finery for the season.”

Sveta closed her eyes, “Sorcha does this Shiggy understand about fae gifts?”

Shiggy yelled, “You don’t need to ask her, ma’am. I understand. I understand.”

Sveta’s eyes popped open. She groaned, “Very well, Angel Trumpet, what did you give in return for this very fine gift?”

Angel sniffed, “I gave a bit of fae fire…as…as well as companionship. What are such gifts among friends?”

Sveta stuck her finger against Angel’s neck. She still held Shiggy with a grasp of steel. “A friend. You call this Shiggy a friend?”

Angel trembled and sniffled, “She is a friend of the fae.”

“Sorcha. Sorcha, did you know this?”

Sorcha still stood near the door, “I knew she was accepted by an Unseelie. About the Seelie, I didn’t know.”

Shiggy sniffled, “What is so wrong with being a friend of the fae?”

Sorcha and Sveta answered together, “Obligations, dear.”

Sveta suddenly released Shiggy. That sent her reeling back against Sorcha. Sorcha caught her.

Sveta still glared. She crossed her arms, “The first is this. Angel Trumpet, no one in this house invited you inside. You are not a companion, guest, associate, friend, or servant here. Do you understand this?”

Angel pressed her hands together, “Mrs. Calloway made this abundantly clear in the charging. I am only an associate for Shiggy. I can only go where she goes and nowhere else. I cannot and will not return to this house.”

“Swear it.”

Angel balked, “I swore already to Mrs. Calloway.”

“Swear it to me, or so help me…”

“I do swear all you asked by the One and All that I will not consider my entrance a standing invitation into your house.” Angel’s hair puffed out. She snarled, “I hate that.”

Sveta lowered her chin, “Second, I will have no fae events at my party. Ms. Tash, Shiggy, you are responsible for that dolled up fairy. Do not let her out of your sight and do not allow her to accomplish any action, use fae power, invite any other fae here, disturb or bother my other guests. Is that clear? There will be guests here who can see her. If anyone asks, tell them Mrs. Calloway allowed it and I know about it. Do not tell anyone about gifts, being friends, being assigned, or anything else concerning this issue. In every sense, use what little common sense you seem to have Shiggy Tash, and do not cause an eruption of unrestraint tonight.”

Shiggy nodded emphatically.

“I really should make you and this fairy swear, but she knows what will happen to her already, and you can’t swear in this fashion. Third, this has royally disturbed my holiday. I don’t know how you can repair the current situation, but I want to see both of you in my office next Monday. Thank the Dagda that I don’t have to put up with Heidi or Scáth this year.” Sveta stomped to the door. Sorcha jumped out of her way and pulled Shiggy to the side. Sveta stood for a good ten seconds taking deep breaths. She smiled, opened the door, and glided out again.

There are other elements in the writing that you can find distinctly in my writing and conversation—especially the gestures and mannerisms of the characters. I’ll look at that next.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 744, Developing Conversation, My Distinct Manner of Writing Q and A

18 July 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 744, Developing Conversation, My Distinct Manner of Writing Q and A

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I’m editing many of my novels using comments from my primary reader. I finished editing Children of Light and Darkness and am now writing on my 27th novel, working title Claire.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

One of my blog readers posed these questions.  I’ll use the next few weeks to answer them.

  1. Conflict/tension between characters
  2. Character presentation (appearance, speech, behavior, gestures, actions)
  3. Change, complexity of relationship, and relation to issues/theme
  4. Evolving vs static character
  5. Language and style
  6. Verbal, gesture, action
  7. Words employed
  8. Sentence length
  9. Complexity
  10. Type of grammar
  11. Diction
  12. Field of reference or allusion
  13. Tone – how tone is created through diction, rhythm, sentence construction, sound effects, images created by similes, syntax/re-arrangement of words in sentence, the inflections of the silent or spoken voice, etc.
  14. Mannerism suggested by speech
  15. Style
  16. Distinct manner of writing or speaking you employ, and why (like Pinter’s style includes gaps, silences, non-sequitors, and fragments while Chekhov’s includes ‘apparent’ inconclusiveness).

Moving on to 16. 16. Distinct manner of writing or speaking you employ, and why (like Pinter’s style includes gaps, silences, non-sequitors, and fragments while Chekhov’s includes ‘apparent’ inconclusiveness).

How does an author create conversation that sounds “real?” The answer isn’t through real conversation. The author develops conversation that communicates reality to his readers. In the first place, words are simply symbols. An author takes his own imagination and turns it into symbols. Those symbols go onto a page, and we call that writing. The author’s purpose is to entertain through symbols (words). The author must turn his imagination from pictures and imagined sounds, tastes, feelings, smells, and sights into words that in an entertaining way convey those thoughts. No one can write the same as another because no one sees the world in exactly the same way as another. The first part is the communication of thoughts.

This explains gaps, silences, non-sequiturs, fragments and ‘apparent’ inconclusiveness. Let’s add to this. In my writing, this explains my frequent use of gestures and tags. My conversation is filled with irony, paradox, understatements, silences, stares, glares, looks, animal responses (grunts, snarls, hisses, etc.). I like verbal confrontation on multiple levels. I like my characters to be snarled in conversations they don’t fully understand. Here is a short example:

Sveta suddenly stared at Shiggy’s shoulder, “Not quite yet. Shiggy, Sorcha come with me and bring…well you know.” Sveta kissed Daniel’s cheek, “Entertain these gentlemen for just a moment, we girls need to take a powder. I’ll be back before our next guests arrive.”

Daniel stood for a moment speechless. He turned to Captain Cross and Major Easom.

Sveta grasped Shiggy’s hand and pulled her to the side and into a sitting room. Sorcha swaggered after them.

Sveta didn’t let go of Shiggy, “Sorcha, close the door.” She turned to Shiggy and pointed at Shiggy’s left shoulder, “Really, what do you mean by bringing her with you?”

Shiggy swallowed, “Mrs. Long may I introduce Angel Trumpet of the Seelie Court.”

Angel curtsied very nicely, “Good evening, Lady of…” Sveta made an elaborate symbol in the air. It shimmered and pulsed for a moment, then disappeared.

Whatever Angel was going to say suddenly stopped. Sveta raised her chin and gripped Shiggy’s arm, “Angel Trumpet, I did not invite you into this house, and I did not expect you,” she glared at Shiggy, “to bring one of the fae in here.”

Shiggy tried to pull away, “Ma’am, my arm.”

Sveta glared at Shiggy and Angel, “Sorcha, what is the meaning of this?”

Sorcha slid over, but not too close, “Well, Aunty, Mrs. Calloway thought Shiggy should have a little extra help in the judgement and wrong-doing area. She assigned Ms. Angel Trumpet here to be Shiggy’s conscious.”

“You’re kidding, right?”

“Serious as a heart attack.”

“Why would she do something like this?”

“You can ask her. She’s attending this evening. I suspect she’ll ask Shiggy and Angel how things are working out.”

Sveta continued to glare, “Why in the world would Mrs. Calloway assign this stupid fairy to Shiggy?”

Angel snuffled.

“Not a word or a sniffle out of you, Angel Trumpet. I don’t need you poisoning my guests or burning my carpet.”

Angel squeaked.

“And what is this fae creature wearing?”

Shiggy was still trying to twist out of Sveta’s grasp, “It’s just Barbie clothing. I thought she could use a little finery for the season.”

Sveta closed her eyes, “Sorcha does this Shiggy understand about fae gifts?”

Shiggy yelled, “You don’t need to ask her, ma’am. I understand. I understand.”

Sveta’s eyes popped open. She groaned, “Very well, Angel Trumpet, what did you give in return for this very fine gift?”

Angel sniffed, “I gave a bit of fae fire…as…as well as companionship. What are such gifts among friends?”

Sveta stuck her finger against Angel’s neck. She still held Shiggy with a grasp of steel. “A friend. You call this Shiggy a friend?”

Angel trembled and sniffled, “She is a friend of the fae.”

“Sorcha. Sorcha, did you know this?”

Sorcha still stood near the door, “I knew she was accepted by an Unseelie. About the Seelie, I didn’t know.”

Shiggy sniffled, “What is so wrong with being a friend of the fae?”

Sorcha and Sveta answered together, “Obligations, dear.”

Sveta suddenly released Shiggy. That sent her reeling back against Sorcha. Sorcha caught her.

Sveta still glared. She crossed her arms, “The first is this. Angel Trumpet, no one in this house invited you inside. You are not a companion, guest, associate, friend, or servant here. Do you understand this?”

Angel pressed her hands together, “Mrs. Calloway made this abundantly clear in the charging. I am only an associate for Shiggy. I can only go where she goes and nowhere else. I cannot and will not return to this house.”

“Swear it.”

Angel balked, “I swore already to Mrs. Calloway.”

“Swear it to me, or so help me…”

“I do swear all you asked by the One and All that I will not consider my entrance a standing invitation into your house.” Angel’s hair puffed out. She snarled, “I hate that.”

Sveta lowered her chin, “Second, I will have no fae events at my party. Ms. Tash, Shiggy, you are responsible for that dolled up fairy. Do not let her out of your sight and do not allow her to accomplish any action, use fae power, invite any other fae here, disturb or bother my other guests. Is that clear? There will be guests here who can see her. If anyone asks, tell them Mrs. Calloway allowed it and I know about it. Do not tell anyone about gifts, being friends, being assigned, or anything else concerning this issue. In every sense, use what little common sense you seem to have Shiggy Tash, and do not cause an eruption of unrestraint tonight.”

Shiggy nodded emphatically.

“I really should make you and this fairy swear, but she knows what will happen to her already, and you can’t swear in this fashion. Third, this has royally disturbed my holiday. I don’t know how you can repair the current situation, but I want to see both of you in my office next Monday. Thank the Dagda that I don’t have to put up with Heidi or Scáth this year.” Sveta stomped to the door. Sorcha jumped out of her way and pulled Shiggy to the side. Sveta stood for a good ten seconds taking deep breaths. She smiled, opened the door, and glided out again.

This represents my writing and conversation. You can see verbal confrontation. You can see gesture and tags. You can see side conversations and soliloquies. There is understatement. You see emotions through conversation and gesture. These are all characteristics of my manner and style of writing.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Posted in Daemon | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 743, Details of Conversation, My Distinct Manner of Writing Q and A

17 July 2016, Writing Ideas – New Novel, part 743, Details of Conversation, My Distinct Manner of Writing Q and A

Announcement:  Ancient Light is delayed due to the economy.  You can read more about it at http://www.ancientlight.com.  Ancient Light includes the second edition of Aegypt plus Sister of Light and Sister of Darkness.  I’ll keep you updated.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I’m using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I’ll keep you informed along the way.

Today’s Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select “production schedule,” you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don’t confuse your readers.
2. Entertain your readers.
3. Ground your readers in the writing.
4. Don’t show (or tell) everything.
5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:
1.  The initial scene (the beginning)
2.  The rising action
3.  The climax
4.  The falling action
5.  The dénouement

The theme statement of my 26th novel, working title, Shape, proposed title, Essie: Enchantment and the Aos Si, is this: Mrs. Lyons captures a shape-shifting girl in her pantry and rehabilitates her.

I just started writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Trainee. This might need some tweaking. The theme statement is something like this: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, the dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.

Here is the cover proposal for Essie: Enchantment and the Aos SiEssie is my 26th novel.

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action.  I’m editing many of my novels using comments from my primary reader. I finished editing Children of Light and Darkness and am now writing on my 27th novel, working title Claire.

I’m an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action–in fact, to write any novel.

Scene development:

  1. Scene input (easy)
  2. Scene output (a little harder)
  3. Scene setting (basic stuff)
  4. Creativity (creative elements of the scene)
  5. Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)
  6. Release (climax of creative elements)

One of my blog readers posed these questions.  I’ll use the next few weeks to answer them.

  1. Conflict/tension between characters
  2. Character presentation (appearance, speech, behavior, gestures, actions)
  3. Change, complexity of relationship, and relation to issues/theme
  4. Evolving vs static character
  5. Language and style
  6. Verbal, gesture, action
  7. Words employed
  8. Sentence length
  9. Complexity
  10. Type of grammar
  11. Diction
  12. Field of reference or allusion
  13. Tone – how tone is created through diction, rhythm, sentence construction, sound effects, images created by similes, syntax/re-arrangement of words in sentence, the inflections of the silent or spoken voice, etc.
  14. Mannerism suggested by speech
  15. Style
  16. Distinct manner of writing or speaking you employ, and why (like Pinter’s style includes gaps, silences, non-sequitors, and fragments while Chekhov’s includes ‘apparent’ inconclusiveness).

Moving on to 16. 16. Distinct manner of writing or speaking you employ, and why (like Pinter’s style includes gaps, silences, non-sequitors, and fragments while Chekhov’s includes ‘apparent’ inconclusiveness).

No conversation in any novel is a real conversation. Listen carefully to any real conversation. Better yet, read a transcript of any conversation or a talk show. Real conversation is nothing like a play or a movie or a show or a novel. Real conversation is filled with sentence fragments, extraneous words, filler words, sounds, and a whole host of other things that would never be acceptable on the printed page. If in a play, movie, or show, real conversation would bore and confuse. In a novel, no one would read it. Real conversation is unprintable and not entertaining.

What a playwright, screenplay author, or novelist does is write conversation as a reader imagines it is said.  However, in reality, the author writes conversation the way he imagines a conversation to sound. The conversation of a good novelist is number one entertaining. Number two, it reveals and forwards the plot, characters, and the theme.

Number one, it is entertaining. I wrote that real conversation is not entertaining. Real conversation requires at least 50% nonverbal communication to be understood. The author doesn’t have this latitude. The best the writer can do is provide some gestures and some expression. An author can’t get near 50% and some scientists tell us nonverbal communication is 80% of a conversation. Because an author can’t write a real conversation and he can’t express all the details or nuance of the conversation, he must do something else.

That something else comes out of the author’s imagination. This is where we get manner of writing, style, and absolute differences between authors. It isn’t just conversation, but conversation fits perfectly in this concept.

Every person sees the world differently—the point of the author is to express her ideas in a way that her readers both understand and are entertained. Just look back at my rules for writing. Because the author sees the world in a certain way, she must turn her imagination into something every reader can understand and enjoy. This is the beginning of manner and style.

More tomorrow.

For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

http://www.ancientlight.com/
http://www.aegyptnovel.com/
http://www.centurionnovel.com
http://www.thesecondmission.com/
http://www.theendofhonor.com/
http://www.thefoxshonor.com
http://www.aseasonofhonor.com

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

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